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Hobbling

This is a discussion on Hobbling within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        11-08-2012, 05:37 PM
      #11
    Trained
    There is a safer way to accomplish your goal. Your horse needs patience. Here's what to do--tie him up and sit down with a good book to read. He needs hours and hours of learning to be tied and to be patient being tied.
    YES, it's worthwhile to teach hobbling, BUT it's dangerous to just put them on and try to get out of the way while your horse panics.
         
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        11-08-2012, 05:40 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    He doesn't paw before I get him the feed. He paws while he's eating. I can tie and leave him and he doesn't paw.
         
        11-08-2012, 06:21 PM
      #13
    Trained
    When I was teaching Ruger things before he was being ridden consistently, I tried to use the hobble method to teach him to lay down. Well he got scared the first time, jumped away from me, then THUMP. Just fell over and laid there. Not even scared just like "Hey Mom, can I get up now?"

    Yeah my horses are freaks.
    Janna likes this.
         
        11-08-2012, 06:37 PM
      #14
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Our young ones paw as well, and even using rubber tubs they often paw dust and dirt up into the bowl and I end up taking it away because I'm afraid that they'll get terrible tummy aches! One thing that helped me keep them from destructing everything is by putting the rubber tub inside of a tire. No harm to the tire if its pawed at, and it takes some strong pawing to move it. If they do move it, chances are it will scare the horse and he won't do it again xD that happened with Peppin, our yearling. I'm sure there are better options though.

    As for hobbling- it might work, but be careful. You can easily hurt the horse and its best to have an experienced person do it the first time. If there is no one in your area that can help you though, research the types and how to correctly put them on, make sure they're going to fit correctly and in the right place- then put him in a confined area. Your sand roundpen should work just fine.

    IME horses take to being hobbled a lot easier if you condition them for it first. This means desensatizing them to things being wrapped around their legs and knowing that giving to pressure releases it. Before hobbling a horse I start with teaching them to lift their foot, step, and put their foot down, according to the pressure that I put on a soft lead rope that is looped around their leg where the hobble would go. Once they do that well, I hobble them.

    Some horses throw a fit at first, some take to it quickly. My mare Sour has had a lot of training already so hobbling her was uneventful. I just put them on, watched her for about 15 minutes to make sure she figured out how to 'shuffle' with them on, and then took them off. I gradually increased the time after that and now she'll wear them as long as I see fit without a fuss. My other horse (now sold), Clyd- was a different story. He was younger and rather reactive. I put them on him and long story short, he threw a tantrum, bucking and hopping and twisting around. Ended up tossing himself over onto his shoulder once before figuring it out. Then he stood, shook himself off like 'well that didn't work!' and quietly grazed for 30 minutes before I took it off. Never had another problem with that, but he did throw a fit that first time! If I leave them on though when he's in a grazing area where the 'grass is greener on the other side' he's figured out how to do this crazy hop-run type thing over to the next patch and he's darned fast! >.>

    Elena said she uses the figure eight, which is a good hobble- but I personally prefer twist hobbles but they can be hard to find. They're made of cotton so there isnt any chaffing (atleast IME) and you can very easily release them should your horse get upset. Its really just your personal preference though.
    Janna likes this.
         
        11-08-2012, 07:17 PM
      #15
    Showing
    My rubber tubs have steel eyelets so I tie a rope to one and set the tub on the ground just on the other side of the fence. If one can't leave all 4 on the ground I use the rope to slide the tub under the fence to where he can't reach it. A horse won't learn after just once, it needs three or four times for him to make the connection. The pawing may get a little frantic but no feed until all fours remain on the ground. And be prepared to remove it again if it starts up again.
         
        11-08-2012, 07:24 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Hobbling wont cure pawing, as you know, but just keep him from busting your buckets and teach him a valuable lesson.

    If your going to use a rounpen to teach hobbling I wouldn't suggest "lettin it rip", he will likely learn to run with a set of hobbles which defeats the purpose. I would use the method Endiku uses with doing some preliminary work with a soft rope, which is much safer than how I have been taught. LOL
         
        11-08-2012, 08:25 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Would just be to keep him from getting his leg up high to big stuff. Not hobbling to keep him from going anywhere, and they won't ever be on long
         
        11-08-2012, 08:31 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Janna    
    Would just be to keep him from getting his leg up high to big stuff. Not hobbling to keep him from going anywhere, and they won't ever be on long
    My point is, that it would be handy for him to actually learn to stand in them in the rare case that you might have to use them or he gets hung up.
    Endiku and Janna like this.
         
        11-08-2012, 10:00 PM
      #19
    Teen Forum Moderator
    It will also teach him not to freak out when he DOES try to paw for the first time and realizes that he really can't. If you just slap them on him and he tries, he's going to think his foot is stuck (and really, it is xD) and he's going to go crazy. If you correctly hobble train him first though, he will not only be 'hobble broke' to addd to his list of credentials(sp?) he will also likely not try to commit suicide when he realizes he's being restrained while eating ;)
    Janna likes this.
         
        11-09-2012, 09:27 AM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    There is a safer way to accomplish your goal. Your horse needs patience. Here's what to do--tie him up and sit down with a good book to read. He needs hours and hours of learning to be tied and to be patient being tied.
    YES, it's worthwhile to teach hobbling, BUT it's dangerous to just put them on and try to get out of the way while your horse panics.
    What would you suggest to stop a horse from pawing while eating? My horse can stand tied for hours- he was in a tie stall for about 6 mos daily. It's when he gets grain and gets excited- how do you stop it then? Stay with them while eating and correct it as it happens?
    Janna likes this.
         

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