Horse aggressive in trailer. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:02 AM
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I agree with Cherie, this is what we do with the baby (who likes to fly backwards with her head up occasionally and Bud, who's just..well, old and stubborn, lol. He'll drag you down the road if you catch him in the wrong mood without a chain, I learned that lesson in a rather muddy part of the paddock. .-.
But, we use a nylon halter because we can't wrap a chain around a rope halter. It's much easier to do a little jerk as opposed to a bigger one to have the same amount of "bite".
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post #12 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:09 AM
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Hmmmmm the biting is a bit of a bugger.....but the kicking, well this is a little uncouth, and it will probably raise some eyebrows....BUT.....I have see someone 'de-kick' a horse with a lunge whip, the horse was a pig of a horse aggressive kicker and squealer. Would kick in the stall to get the horse next door, kick in the trailer, kick in the cross tie, just an outright danger to herself, other horses and people....just a pain in the butt. The guy got so fed up with this horse, that he took it outside, snubbed her to a post and deliberately smacked her across the back legs with a lunge whip to get her to kick....and naturally she kicked, so it was tit for tat for sometime, everytime she kicked, he smacked her back.......she did stop kicking.
It was a hard lesson.......but it was a lesson learned. I wouldn't want to have to resort to it, but sometimes you have to let a horse make a mistake before you can correct them and show them what you want......
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post #13 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:33 AM
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Is there a divider for the heads too? Our's has a divider but I've never had to use it with our horses.......if he misbehaves like that when backing out I would back him aggressivinly and yell NO at him and keep him backing even when you get off the trailer.....then walk him in again and if he does it back him out aggressivily! I would keep doing it till he behaved himself when going in or out.....

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post #14 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
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There's a divider in both trailers and the horses are tied short so they can't reach around it.
I like Cherie's idea. I only worry that if our timing is off, he might associate the trailer with bad things. Right now, he loads and unloads fine alone. Then we have to figure out which horse is going to be the guinea pig standing beside him.
Muppet, I've heard of people doing that with horses too.

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post #15 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:57 AM
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Have you thought about trainng him to wear kicking chains on his back legs? EVERYTIME he kicks, they whack him in the legs....therefore kicking = discomfort? Just an idea
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post #16 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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I've actually never even heard of those.

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post #17 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 07:55 AM
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The rope halter will not work in a trailer because you cannot put any effective pressure on it when you need to. You need to make it hurt when he kicks. It is really simple. He kick or bites or lays his ears back and it hurts -- period. A chain run through a good nylon halter will release instantly when you quit jerking on it. I keep a couple of good Valhoma halters and I keep them around just so I can use them with a chain when I need them. Nowadays, since I no longer train for the public, I seldom need them. [One has a built-in chain that you can just snap a lead-rope into it.]

You are not trying to avoid the situation (like with chains on legs). You are trying to fix the actual problem so it is completely gone.

I have seen horse that were whipped for kicking (had a couple brought to me and bought one -- really cheap) and the whipping made them worse. They became much more viscous with their kicking. Plus, just like any other use of a whip (remember, I hate using them) many horses just learn that they have to mind when a whip is present or they get more aggressive. When you use a lip chain especially, you can stop just about any unacceptable behavior in one session. I have done it with horses that had kicked trailers completely apart -- into little pieces.

I have geldings in the trail string right now that were kickers when I got them. After a week of living here, I could haul any of them tied to the left side of either stock trailer that we have. One hauls 10 horses and the other hauls 7. I also mix loads of mares and gelding and none of them kick. They haul anywhere in any order. They hop in and back out without me ever having to get into the trailer. Some were pretty spoiled when I got them.
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post #18 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 08:56 AM
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My Mom had a nasty horse in the trailer, In the straight load, we loaded him first, tied him shorter than normal, and unloaded him last.

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post #19 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 09:38 AM
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But TC -- That did not do anything to teach the horse to be better behaved. It just avoided the problem. He needed an attitude adjustment instead -- not a tie-rope adjustment.

A well trained, well behaved horse should not require that the handler jumps through hoops or does anything different. My test for a horse is this -- Can I loan him to someone without sending along a list of what the handler / rider has to do to get along with him? If he has a 'list', he has holes in his training.

People did not send me their spoiled horses to have me figure out how to get along with their problems. They sent them to me to get them retrained and fixed. So, when I come on here, my answers are going to be aimed at fixing the holes and coming out with a trained horse that does not have a list.

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post #20 of 30 Old 11-29-2012, 10:44 AM
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There was no way my 78 year old mother was going to get in a trailer with a nose chain around her horse's nose, nor would I ever suggest her doing so. Sometimes, I feel, a simple avoidence is best.
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