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Horse attacks...

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  • My other horse attacks the horse while i'm riding it

 
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    11-09-2007, 04:19 PM
  #11
Started
The fact that she keeps other horses away from you when you are out in the pasture is a compliment, but that needs to stop. In your "herd of two" YOU are the alpha, and YOU are the one who keeps other horses away from YOUR herd. So really make a point of keeping other horses away from her when you can, and this can really make an impression on a horse. When they see that you are taking the leadership role, a lot of times they calm down and happily let you take on that duty. Although more dominant horses may not be so willing to let it go. That's just their horsenality and it can take time.

I would definitely tie a red ribbon to her tail. And if someone is getting too close, it's YOUR job, again, to keep your herd safe, so tell that person to back off lol. Me, personally, I have no reservations about being "mean" to someone if they are getting too close and it could turn out to be a dangerous situation. It's not meant to be personal. Some people just don't have a lot of common sense when it comes to that kinda thing.

One thing you could try is everytime a horse comes up, reach down and rub and stroke her neck. I'm telling you, we use this on our horses if there is smack talk going on, and before you know it their ears perk up and their expression softens. It's like telling them that everything's okay. It's worked with our horses anyway.
     
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    11-10-2007, 02:17 AM
  #12
Yearling
Our mare is about 6 months in foal, and just in the last month, she has gotten positively nasty towards other horses when she is being ridden by the student in group 4H lessons. She hasn't tried to pull that with me yet, but I think she knows she can with the kids. When a less familiar horse (she is okay with her heard buddies) comes within range of her, she pins her her ears and charges toward them with her head ready to bite. She hasn't backed up her threats yet, but man what a difference in her attitude lately. Is this common with pregnant horses?


Just for my input: I agree with spirithorse that establishing your dominance from the ground and in the pasture will probably work wonders to show her that it is not her job to run off other horses from you, but your job to choose when to run other horses off from her.

When my stallion got a little upity (stallion territorial) with me while he was penned with our mare, I went after him like I was a dominant stallion. I used my posture and a very aggressive sort of horse bellow to run him all around the pen, but kept him away from the mare. She was freaked out at first until she realized that he was my "target", then she just stood there letting me run him around and keep him away from her. By the end he was standing at distance looking very alert at me like, "what the...??" He hasn't tried to pull dominance on me since, although I am sure he will again at some point.

I would practice keeping her away from the other horses in the pasture while you give them attention and also practice keeping the other horses away from her while you give her attention (rather than letting her run them off for you).

I bet if you can get a change in attitude from the ground, it will carry over well in the saddle. If you could do it in a controlled environment, you could then practice the same thing form the saddle. Maybe in an arena with one other horse..have them ride near you (but not near enough to get hurt), and then if she shows any signs (tense, pinned ears, starting to charge), get ahold of her, hop down, and run her well away from the other horse. Work her a bit while keeping her away from the other horse. Then get back on and give it another shot. Make sure your tack is secure enough not to get stepped on while you are moving her around at liberty. If you see improvements doing this with the first horse maybe try it with different horses or even multiple horses. Just make sure nobody gets so close to you that you can't get ahold of her before she is able to strike. You and the other riders would have to really be on your toes. I would definitely try to make the change in dominance in the pasture first, and then maybe try it from the saddle. I have no idea whether this idea would work from the saddle, but I say it is worth a shot if you can remove the behavior. :)
     
    11-12-2007, 01:51 AM
  #13
Foal
One thing you could try is making your horse give to the bit. Any time she even thinks about acting nasty bend her head around towards your knee. Do not let go until she softens and is standing still. This requires perfect timing on your part, because as soon as she gives you some slack you must release immediately. If you don’t release the pressure when she does she will just learn to fight it. However, if you release before she does you are reinforcing her pulling back and being dominant. The idea is to get her attention away from the other horse and back on you. It will also teach her to be soft in the mouth and give to pressure. If once you release she acts up again pull her head back around. Continue doing it until she ignores the other horse and is calm. Make sure to reward her when she does well with plenty of praise. The biggest key when using this method is consistency. First I would practice while riding alone until she gets the idea. Also,make sure to do it equally on both sides when teaching her how. This is what I did for my horse before I gelded him. Every time he looked at, or talked to a mare I would make him give me his head. He soon learned to ignore them. I can now easily bend his head to me at any time with just a slight touch. I teach all the horses I work with how to do this, and it comes in very handy. Hope that helps. : )
     
    11-12-2007, 10:35 AM
  #14
Foal
My mare is a ALPHA horse too. What my trainer did was pony her behind another horse. The horse that he rode was not aggressive or submissive. My mare had to follow beside the butt of the other horse. My horse had her halter on and a lead rope. My trainer held the lead rope, so he could let it go at any time it might have gotten dangerous. I stood in the middle and watched. My mare watched me...it was like she was asking me 'what's going on?'. My mare did nothing aggressive. When my trainer knew she was fine, I rode and did the ponying. My mare was upset when I got on the other horse. It seems like something you are experiencing. After I rode the other horse for awhile with my mare behind us, I hopped off and rode my mare and my trainer rode the other horse. My mare was a perfect angel when my trainer rode close to us. I don't know if it was because of the ponying or the fact that she didn't like to see me on another horse.
I just wanted to let you know my experience. I don't know if it will work on your horse.
Good Luck and Be Safe!
     
    11-12-2007, 05:03 PM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by PromoteMyHorse
My mare is a ALPHA horse too. What my trainer did was pony her behind another horse. The horse that he rode was not aggressive or submissive. My mare had to follow beside the butt of the other horse. My horse had her halter on and a lead rope. My trainer held the lead rope, so he could let it go at any time it might have gotten dangerous. I stood in the middle and watched. My mare watched me...it was like she was asking me 'what's going on?'. My mare did nothing aggressive. When my trainer knew she was fine, I rode and did the ponying. My mare was upset when I got on the other horse. It seems like something you are experiencing. After I rode the other horse for awhile with my mare behind us, I hopped off and rode my mare and my trainer rode the other horse. My mare was a perfect angel when my trainer rode close to us. I don't know if it was because of the ponying or the fact that she didn't like to see me on another horse.
I just wanted to let you know my experience. I don't know if it will work on your horse.
Good Luck and Be Safe!
That's an interesting idea.
     
    11-13-2007, 08:08 AM
  #16
Showing
Thanks, All, for great advices! I think I'll get red ribbon to put on her just in case next year. :)
     
    11-13-2007, 12:38 PM
  #17
Showing
Good time of year to get one with all the red Christmas bows out there. I have a pretty little Christmas bow I use on Vida year round. She only kicks at boys (geldings) who get too close, can't say as I blame her
     
    11-13-2007, 01:10 PM
  #18
Showing
It's funny though. Mine doesn't look angry or anything until sudden. That's why it's so hard to improve - never know when it's going to happen. If I watch her out closely she doesn't chase away other one. As long as I'm busy with poop cleaning or something and not watching - she takes an advantage of that.

Anyway, all horses can kick for sure, so personally I try to keep distance myself from any most quiet horse while riding, because you never know whether the horse is in mood. Lol!

BTW, where to attach the ribbon? Just around the tail?
     
    11-13-2007, 01:25 PM
  #19
Showing
I just kinda hoop the ribbon around a rubber band and then attach it to a small strand of tail hair. I don't wrap it around the whole tail.
     
    11-13-2007, 02:31 PM
  #20
Showing
Thanks, Vida!
     

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