horse that bites - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 07-31-2008, 04:27 PM
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you can always bite him back. HARD. I've done it before. I works, grab the muzzle and bite back. I only did it because the mare bit my hip and brought tears to my eyes... I'm still kind of shocked to this day that I did it, I just grabbed her muzzle and bit down... But let me tell you, that mare NEVER bit me again.

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post #12 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 03:46 AM
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I agree. Just dont forget to punish him WITHIN 3 SECONDS of biting. Otherwise he wont know why youre punishing him. i also read an interesting article

"The last thing to cover is what to do if the horse has bitten you.
A bite is when the horse opens his teeth even a fraction of an inch, and either bites you, your clothes, the air, or is aimed in your direction. When a horse bites you, you should consider it an act of war. He just declared war on you. There are a few rules to follow. Number one is you have three seconds to retaliate. If three seconds have passed since he bit you, just be prepared for the next time. There is no place in horse training for revenge. With the three seconds in mind you want to convince the horse that you are going to kill him. You want to get angry enough that you convey the thought that the horse just made the biggest mistake of his life. That's how serious biting is. I know of people who have had the muscles in their arms ripped out, and I know of someone who has been killed by one bite from a horse. If you are within the three-second limit, you are allowed to yell, hit, scream, roar, kick etc... You are not allowed to hit the horse with anything above the withers that could put his eye out, and you also don't want to hit him with something that could break the skin. No one can ever hit a horse as hard as another horse can kick him. So, the goal is not to cause physical pain but, to convince him that he almost made a mistake that cost him his life. We want to scare him to death! Once he's convinced, he won't try biting us again."

from http://www.infohorse.com/hilton.asp


i have the same problem with a falabella at my stables...

People have always scared me a bit, you see - they're so complicated. I suppose that's why I prefer horses.








It's a lot like nuts and bolts - if the rider's nuts, the horse bolts!
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post #13 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 07:10 AM
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Equine's article is 100% on the money.

You are dealing with an animal that is over 1,000 lb and in many cases much more. The horse has some innate rules that it follows and you must play by those rules and use those rules to your advantage. Your horse needs to learn respect and fall into the proper pecking order. If you don't have the courage to "retaliate" as he expects, then you really should consider getting a goat. Biting is one of the very worse things a horse can do to you because it happens so quickly and can be so devastating not only to you but to anyone who comes within reach.

Beating a horse is cruel. Overreacting is incorrect. Prolonging the punishment is counterproductive. It needs to be the proper response and one that your horse understands.

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

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post #14 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 08:09 AM
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Heh... I have no idea if this actually works, but it sounded cool in "the Black Stallion's Filly".

She was a really bad biter, so he put a hot potato up in his shirt, right where she'd normally bite, so that when she bit down on him, he would make sure she bit the hot potato, burning her mouth some. She hurt herself when she bit down on his "arm", while not being hit at all, decreasing any chance that she'd become head shy.

I have no idea if it would actually work... but it sounded pretty cool and smart in the book...
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post #15 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureVetGirl
Heh... I have no idea if this actually works, but it sounded cool in "the Black Stallion's Filly".

She was a really bad biter, so he put a hot potato up in his shirt, right where she'd normally bite, so that when she bit down on him, he would make sure she bit the hot potato, burning her mouth some. She hurt herself when she bit down on his "arm", while not being hit at all, decreasing any chance that she'd become head shy.

I have no idea if it would actually work... but it sounded pretty cool and smart in the book...
Sounds good, but one question. How did "He" keep the potato from burning his arm?

So many folks here have said that a horse learns through actions to establish the pecking order and I could not agree more nldiaz66. Not only is biting dangerous, it also shows no respect to you as the alpha which is the role you need to establish with your horse.
A smack to the nose, a pinched nostril, a kick to the hoof. Whatever action you decide works best to deter the dominant display from your horse needs to be instant and consistant. Acompany this action with a loud, abrassive noise like a verbal, rasping "HAAAAAAAA-HA-HA" .You have about two seconds inside of which to react to a horses bad ground behavior. Anything past that and the horse may not know what the action was for. This is not cruelety, this is horse herd behavior. The horse will respect you in the long run as its leader, the alpha.

Each response shoul be metered to the horse bad behavior in speed and force. Never lose your temper.

I had a new to me horse who would bite. When smaked for her efforts she would then pin her ears as she returned to attempt to take a serious bite. This resulted in a thumb and forefinger pinch and twist to her nearest nostril fast and hard enough to cause her to squeal, then turn and leave. Today I can walk into her stall, or up to her in the pasture to rub her muzzle, stroke her forehead, clip her, whatever I need or want to do and she accepts it with a kind calm eye and no bad behavior. She will actually rest her chin on my arm and go to sleep on the ocassion where I simply stand there and stroke her forehead. She has accepted me as her alpha, she respects me and I her. The point here is be consistant. What some folks may view as cruel the, horse will view as normal behavior by which the herd dominance is established and the the Alpha (You)elected.

The Wind of Heaven is that which blows between a horses ears.
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post #16 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 09:49 AM
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"He" is Henry Dailey, and the way he kept it from burning his arm was that he had a sponge or something there.

But like I said... it was something from a fictional book, and that does NOT mean that it would actually work. I just thought it sounded kind of inventive.

But I do agree with what you said (Harley Heaven). You need to assert yourself as the alpha. If a horse (dog, cat, or any other animal) sees you as weak, they'll take advantage of it. In herds, the alpha mares will punish the young colts for various deeds. It takes a while, but they learn. And by punishing, it's not "tsk tsk... you know you shouldn't do that..." in a crooning voice or something. It's by biting the colt, kicking the colt, or anything else to show him that it's not appropriate behavior. Would you call a horse out for "cruelty" when it's teaching? Or do you only call a human out for doing the same thing (that's a lot kinder on the horse than the mare would be).
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post #17 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 09:57 AM
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I actuallly turned one of my horses into a nipper by offering too many hand fed treats. As soon as we realized what was happening the treats stopped immediately. Twister was following me on the leadrope and I had turned our direction so I was just a fuzz in front of him and I heard the distinct snap of his teeth and felt the graze of his muzzle on my elbow. I didn't even think, I reacted with an open handed slap to his muzzle...I didn't aim, I didn't look, I just puffed up and swung my hand around and made loud,sharp, swift,hard contact. He instantly dropped his head as to say...OMGOSH....I'm SORRY! It only took one really good smack and he hasn't tried it again. In fact he will drop his head to me now when I go to let him out. As if he is offering his forelock for a scratch at my waist level.

Be strong and courageous, and do the work. Don't be afraid or discouraged by the size of the task, for the Lord God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.

1 Chronicles 28:20








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post #18 of 24 Old 08-23-2008, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureVetGirl
Heh... I have no idea if this actually works, but it sounded cool in "the Black Stallion's Filly".

She was a really bad biter, so he put a hot potato up in his shirt, right where she'd normally bite, so that when she bit down on him, he would make sure she bit the hot potato, burning her mouth some. She hurt herself when she bit down on his "arm", while not being hit at all, decreasing any chance that she'd become head shy.

I have no idea if it would actually work... but it sounded pretty cool and smart in the book...
I read something like that except for she used like a hard-bristled brush and taped it to where her horse would bite... to me it sounded easier than a hot potato.

p.s.. Is the other way i typped ok to use? PM me or type here..

People have always scared me a bit, you see - they're so complicated. I suppose that's why I prefer horses.








It's a lot like nuts and bolts - if the rider's nuts, the horse bolts!
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post #19 of 24 Old 08-24-2008, 12:35 AM
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I have been told to hit, slap, or do something, but trumb it off after ward. This tells the hoss that I am the boss but no hard feelings and everything is OK. I was checking my horse's feet and he tried to bite me in the rear but I caught him before he did it. And, hit him squarly in the jaw, I was bad and walked away. I got about twenty feet away. Then I returned and whap it off. He started to follow me out of the field. Horses feel their need a leader.

A good cowboy always has a better horse at the end of the ride, a poor cowboy will be afoot reguardless of the horse.

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post #20 of 24 Old 08-26-2008, 11:37 PM Thread Starter
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thanks anyone for the advice, he is doing much better, i tried smacking him in his nose, but he started getting headshy, so i quit, i got i tree branch, that worked, smacked him on his butt,made him walk, then come back to me.he has improved 100 %, no more nipping in weeks, not even trying.So I think i also need to say when i first got him i was a little scared of him, he had already bit me once and i knew how it felt, so anyways I'm over my fear, but still very aware of whats going on.Now we been doing lots of ground work.
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