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Horse bucked me off

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  • Horse bucked when he saw another horse acting up
  • Horse bucked rider off and then stood quietly

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    02-23-2013, 02:00 PM
  #11
Green Broke
I am really glad you didn't get seriously hurt. Getting thrown from a horse can result in so many serious injuries (broken neck, dislocated discs in your back, etc etc).

Training a horse from the ground sounds like this is above your current skill level. He was very clearly giving you WAVING RED FLAGS that something was different about his attitude. The fact that you failed to see these obvious cues makes me agree with the others that a trainer (in person) will greatly help you with this horse.

Don't take that as slam against you -- ALL OF US were where you were, at some point in our lives. You have to start somewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shellybean    
The only thing is, I feel I did a great job on his ground work. I have completed everything I have read about online regarding groundwork, (most of it on this forum) and watched in training videos and had advice from people at my barn. I put A LOT of time and work into it and I feel it is very good. When I rode him for the first time, at my barn, he didn't think twice about having me on his back...or the next 4 times I rode him so that is why I am confused as to why yesterday he decided he didn't want me riding him...

I agree I should have listened to what he was telling me, but I felt if he kept walking circles around the mounting block he was getting was he was wanting as well, me not riding him. I planned on just sitting on him for a second and hopping off because he was so antsy, and if I sat on him for a second he still wouldn't win the battle at the mounting block...but he had a different idea.
Riding 5 times in the past 2 weeks typically is NOT enough for a very young horse just starting out. Short daily sessions are much better.

How are his ground manners? Of course, on this particular day, they were horrible, since he completely refused to stand still. That's why moving his feet, making him lunge, and making him LISTEN and FOCUS on you would have been more effective before you got on. As someone else already mentioned, that's a "flight check" to see how your horse is feeling for the day.

Before I get on a young horse learning to ride, I'm paying attention to their behavior the instant I get them in the pasture. How do they stand when I check and pickout all of their feet? Brushing them? Saddling? Then I will lunge them for a few minutes to make sure they stop when I ask, turn when I ask, back up when I ask, move their shoulders or hindquarters independently when I ask, etc. Then I will stand next to them on the ground, and ask them to them to flex their head (with the bit) both ways so I know that my "turning" and "stopping" will work when I get on board them. If they have been acting goosey, I will ask them to give their head to my knee as I am mounting. That way, if they do try something, I've already got their head to my knee to stop the buck.

Depending on the horse, I will eventually skip some of these steps. But with some of them, I'm doing this check for a full 30 days. Just depends on the horse.

If you are not able to ride through a buck, it's best to have someone else ride. You don't want your horse getting away with it.

Or, if you can at least keep a hold on the reins when you have fallen (this is why I ride young horses with long split reins), then you can work their BUTT off immediately from the ground, and show them that this was NOT acceptable.

I'd be very careful with your horse right now, because he got you off once. He has now learned that he can do what he wants if he gets rid of you. It will be a hard lesson to re-teach for him.
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    02-23-2013, 02:17 PM
  #12
Yearling
You don't know why he bucked; I don't know why you insisted on riding!

I have a fairly laid-back horse, but one thing she does, is get weird when she knows she's going to be trailered. We can play trailer-loading forever, she loves getting in and out; but when she knows she's going somewhere (by watching us prepare, filliing tires etc.) she starts getting strange. She'll start figiting during grooming, until she can't stand still, and so on.

I once noticed this, but we weren't going anywhere, so I thought as soon as she figured it out, she'd be fine. But it wasn't. She gave me a stellar ride, because she was so forward; but then she just stood still, shook her head, and I knew she was going to blow. I couldn't even get off! Finally, after a lot of one-rein-stops, I was able to dismount. (Quicker than I thought I could!)

She seemed fine; then, leading her back to the barn, she just took off, and ran away, with the reins flapping. She ran and ran and ran. Usually she runs BEFORE I bring her in (when she knows she's going to be trailered).

I'm writing this long story just to add to the general sentiment, that when things don't seem right, they probably aren't; stay safe! From that experience, whenever I have the least doubt, I'll lunge first. It helps release anxiety, and I can gauge how anxious she really is.
     
    02-23-2013, 02:32 PM
  #13
Started
You should check his saddle fitting. Make sure there are no burrs or anything that could upset him. Also, make sure you do enough groundwork so he is listening. If he isn't listening to you on the ground, there is no way he will listen to you on his back. Try doing more than just lunging. I mean, if you kept going around and around in circles - I would get pretty bored and probably stop listening. Just a thought.

Hope this helped!!
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    02-24-2013, 01:09 AM
  #14
Weanling
Thanks again for the great advice.

Something I wanted to clear up...He is nearly 12 years old, so he is not a young horse, he was "started" by his previous owner within the past year. The owner threw a saddle on his back and walked him around his property and indoor arena a handful of times. I brought him home in December and started him on ground work before even thinking of riding him. He caught on extremely fast and was very eager to please. After 2 months of consistent groundwork (5 days a week) I decided to hop on after one of our lunging sessions because he was doing SO well. He took to it like nothing and acted right at home under saddle. I then rode him again the next day and gave him the next two off because it was the weekend and he gets the weekends off. I then wasn't feeling very well that Monday so I just did some groundwork and took it easy with him and did some fun exercises. I worked Tuesday and got called into work early on Wednesday so here goes another 2 days I could have riden...my schedule continues like this since I've been getting called in a lot and have had less barn time and the only times I can make it out is during feeding which I'm not too fond of. I wish I could have ridden him every day, but my work is so unpredictable that I have been making it out to the barn less than I'd like... hence only riding him 5 times in the past 2 weeks (10 days to be exact...first ride was on February 12).

I usually go out around 1 every week day and stay until about 3:30 but that night I went around 4:30-7 so it was a drastic change from when I usually come.
     
    02-24-2013, 01:13 AM
  #15
Yearling
So basically the horse was fresh and need worked up until he was good and sweaty before you climbed on.. It's pretty simple to figure out. Just work him up really good, not just for five minutes, do twenty if you feel like you need to.
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    02-24-2013, 01:37 AM
  #16
Yearling
The wide eyes make me think something was really bothering him to begin with. Was he acting this way BEFORE you put the saddle on? (something pinching him?) Have you been riding him WITH other horses close and this time didnt? (herd sour?)

But on a green horse you HAVE to lunge them first BEFORE getting on to gauge the attitude your dealing with that day. It's an animal, not a machine. You will wont have too much fluctuation with him being a gelding.

AND I have had a trainer tell me: if your on the horse and he bucks.... hold on, but if you can, GET OFF! Your most likely going to get hurt. I know this goes against ALOTcof stuff you've heard, but the bottom line to it is: the horse is bucking bc it isnt ready to accept the saddle and/or rider.

You have to work on this. And I have seen this same trainer have horses started just like your in a month (CONSTANT DAILY TRAINING!-it doesnt have to be intense everyday, but as long as it's every day.). And one of these horses he has broken goes to the local saddle club in the summer and is currently being rode by a young girl (around 10-12yrs old). Plus lets face it. Most of us are too old, or dependent on our health to get thrown off a horse. And if you can lower the risk of getting hurt, but working harder to prevent it, it's probably a not a horrible idea.

You may have a little problem with respect here too.

I'm not saying don't get back on his back. I mean, start again! He does that, get off and start working with making him comfortable with it. WORKING! Put a ball on his back, climb up and get down, repeatedly. Get him comfortable....

Whites in the eyes is fear though. Think through everything really well! Try to figure it out, bc it wasnt for NO REASON!

;)
I'd like to point out that this trainers brother is exactly opposite. He wants you to hold on buckaroo! But he got my horse to stop rearing back on the rider. Turns out it was a communication problem. And he hasnt reared since....
     
    02-24-2013, 10:47 AM
  #17
Weanling
He wasn't acting like this before hand while I was tacking him up. He is always a little wiggly when putting on his girth so that is nothing new, we're working on that too tho. I will put it on and take it off and repeat multiple times and he gets less and less wiggly every time.

I had lunged him every other time before riding him so that was a mistake on my part for not doing that. Our routine was all over the place that night...I'm usually out around 1, I get him from pasture, groom him, tack him up, lunge him for 10 mins, practice standing at the mounting block while I put weight in the stirrup a couple of times, look at his body/face/ears for any signals (and he's been calm but attentive every other time), and then I get on sit for a couple seconds and then walk on. But that night I came out around 4:30/5:00 (near feeding time), brought him in from pasture, put him in the arena for 10 mins since the tractor was in the aisle cleaning the last couple of stalls and was blocking the cross ties, brought him to the cross ties afterwards, groomed him, tacked him up, brought him in the arena and skipped lunging (I honestly don't know why I did...stupid of me), checked his girth and then attempted to get on while he was acting up. I didn't want to let him get away with acting up even though he was giving me all the warning signals...I figured I'd sit on his back and get right back off but I didn't have enough time to dismount safely lol. Although he did throw me in a way where I summersaulted and didn't hit the ground hard at all and I am not even sore from the fall.
     
    02-24-2013, 07:13 PM
  #18
Yearling
Option 1: Pain
Option 2: Lack of focus.

This horse needs more ground work if he thinks it's acceptable to buck under saddle.
     
    02-24-2013, 07:40 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by shellybean    
Thanks again for the great advice.

Something I wanted to clear up...He is nearly 12 years old, so he is not a young horse, he was "started" by his previous owner within the past year. The owner threw a saddle on his back and walked him around his property and indoor arena a handful of times. I brought him home in December and started him on ground work before even thinking of riding him. He caught on extremely fast and was very eager to please. After 2 months of consistent groundwork (5 days a week) I decided to hop on after one of our lunging sessions because he was doing SO well. He took to it like nothing and acted right at home under saddle. I then rode him again the next day and gave him the next two off because it was the weekend and he gets the weekends off. I then wasn't feeling very well that Monday so I just did some groundwork and took it easy with him and did some fun exercises. I worked Tuesday and got called into work early on Wednesday so here goes another 2 days I could have riden...my schedule continues like this since I've been getting called in a lot and have had less barn time and the only times I can make it out is during feeding which I'm not too fond of. I wish I could have ridden him every day, but my work is so unpredictable that I have been making it out to the barn less than I'd like... hence only riding him 5 times in the past 2 weeks (10 days to be exact...first ride was on February 12).

I usually go out around 1 every week day and stay until about 3:30 but that night I went around 4:30-7 so it was a drastic change from when I usually come.
Thank you for the extra background information. That helps. Just because you are now riding him, doesn't mean you should stop groundwork exercises. As many of us have pointed out, groundwork before you ride is a fantastic way to see what mood your horse is in for the day.

But it doesn't matter how old he is. He is still a green inexperienced horse. I completely understand that work gets in the way, but green horses require a lot of time. Especially if some issues are cropping up, like they are now.

And if you vary the time you ride, it really should not matter. He should be expected to focus on you even if it's 3 AM in the morning. Again, its all about being able to read your horse and get a feel for what mood he is in, so that you can deal with him appropriately.
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    02-25-2013, 04:43 AM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by shellybean    
He wasn't acting like this before hand while I was tacking him up. He is always a little wiggly when putting on his girth so that is nothing new, we're working on that too tho. I will put it on and take it off and repeat multiple times and he gets less and less wiggly every time.

I had lunged him every other time before riding him so that was a mistake on my part for not doing that. Our routine was all over the place that night...I'm usually out around 1, I get him from pasture, groom him, tack him up, lunge him for 10 mins, practice standing at the mounting block while I put weight in the stirrup a couple of times, look at his body/face/ears for any signals (and he's been calm but attentive every other time), and then I get on sit for a couple seconds and then walk on. But that night I came out around 4:30/5:00 (near feeding time), brought him in from pasture, put him in the arena for 10 mins since the tractor was in the aisle cleaning the last couple of stalls and was blocking the cross ties, brought him to the cross ties afterwards, groomed him, tacked him up, brought him in the arena and skipped lunging (I honestly don't know why I did...stupid of me), checked his girth and then attempted to get on while he was acting up. I didn't want to let him get away with acting up even though he was giving me all the warning signals...I figured I'd sit on his back and get right back off but I didn't have enough time to dismount safely lol. Although he did throw me in a way where I summersaulted and didn't hit the ground hard at all and I am not even sore from the fall.
Ok, WHEN did he start acting like a goob, lol... If he was behaving before you tacked up, then there you go. It could have been as simple. OR he saw something else that got him that way. But yea, main reason you lunge is to check that. I STILL lunge my mare and she's been broke for two years. The lady that trained me lunges ALL her horses real quick before riding. EVEN if it's just one pass in both directions. Just making sure the saddle sits right and that the horse is listening and ready to work. Just don't forget this step next time. I was actually a little scared to tell you to get off, lol.... I thought someone was going to pick it apart (SO THANKS EVERYONE!). Bc I didnt mean don't get back on. I just meant spend awhile (the same day) getting him to accept the rider. And then get back on. I'm a momma, I can't afford to get hurt bad. LOL....

IMO I think something was pinching him or pressing wrong, but without being there I can't pick apart the situation myself, lol...

You got some really good advise from everyone, just try to apply it. :)
     

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