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Horse bucked me off

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  • Horse bucked me off too much energy
  • Horse bucked me off because i would not let him lead

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    03-24-2013, 08:44 AM
  #41
Showing
Is he kept in a stall and allowed to blow off excess energy prior to lunging or riding? This is the season that they feel frisky. Look at his diet. He doesn't need anything other than hay as he is considered an idle horse. Overfed horses need to blow the energy with a 15min turnout. Let him get his bucking done and over before you do anything with him.
     
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    03-26-2013, 10:36 PM
  #42
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
Is he kept in a stall and allowed to blow off excess energy prior to lunging or riding? This is the season that they feel frisky. Look at his diet. He doesn't need anything other than hay as he is considered an idle horse. Overfed horses need to blow the energy with a 15min turnout. Let him get his bucking done and over before you do anything with him.
He is out in pasture from sun up til sun down and is only stalled at night, so he has plenty of time to burn off his energy. Right now he is fed oats and unlimited hay so I don't know if the oats are making him hot? He was apparently fed them at his previous home too and he was fine for my ride there...

He's just making me so discouraged...I'm losing all of my confidence and I feel like I am wasting all of my money on training and he is never going to willingly accept a rider, or he is going to turn into the same bratty horse (towards riding) when he gets back from training. The previous owner made it sound like he was a lot further along in training than he really was. "He is green broke and responds well to leg pressure and has a very soft mouth. He has been trail ridden around the property and ridden by [his] 9 year old son in the indoor arena". All of which seems spot on when I rode him at their property...he was a dream, very willing and eager to please.

Some days I wish I had never bought him and want to find him a new home, but I'm scared he is going to end up with a meat buyer...and I can't give up on him like that.

I spent forever looking for a horse and when I finally found him we instantly clicked and it felt like it was meant to be...a few months later he decides he doesn't want to be ridden and throws me...my friends randomly decide to get a horse and buy the first one they find and they all turn out wonderfully for them. They hop on for their first ride bareback with a halter and their horses don't care, if I were to do that with Apollo I'd be on the ground with a broken neck. I just wish I could join them on their fun trail rides and ride with them in the arena instead of have to sit on the fence and watch from a far. Its not fair...I put so much time and effort into looking for a horse and it took me a couple before I found one that I clicked with, and of course the one I clicked with happens to need the most work and money put into him. I love him though, I just wish things ran smoother...
     
    03-31-2013, 07:59 PM
  #43
Weanling
He works SO much better outside...he is like a completely different horse. I was just doing groundwork since my trainer isn't coming out until tomorrow, and he was much more relaxed; hanging his head, being EXTREMELY quiet and attentive. He's giving me hope again...I was starting to give up on him because of his anxiety getting worse and worse (spring isn't helping either :P). I'm going to change his food too and see if that helps some with his craziness.

Usually it takes a while before I can even get him to stand by the mounting block, but I walked him up to it and he stood there quietly without trying to walk off every time I stepped on the block which was a big improvement. He even let me lay across the saddle and I even put a lot of weight in the stirrup and pretended to get on and while he wasn't thrilled about it, he was much calmer than he has been since he started this whole bucking thing. He was still a little tense about it though...he always anticipates things which is annoying, but with a little work with this daily I think he'll be good in no time :)

I even had other boarders come out and comment on how well he was doing. They too noticed how calm and happy he is outside vs. the indoor arena.
     
    04-01-2013, 07:07 AM
  #44
Weanling
Horse do not do things to 'get out of work' or anything of the sort. They are either unschooled or in pain if they do not stand to be mounted; it may be the saddle placement, how you mount (no contact, grabbing, toes, etc etc) , pain somehow, or lack of progressive schooling. A teacher can help you understand what to do. If the horse has not been out, lungeing WITH controlled meaning will help the horse to understand what you want, and how to get it.
     
    04-01-2013, 08:34 AM
  #45
Super Moderator
Quote:
Horse do not do things to 'get out of work' or anything of the sort. They are either unschooled or in pain if they do not stand to be mounted;
I agree that horses do not do things because they want to 'get out of work'. But, you are dead wrong that they learn bad habits like 'not letting a person mount' ONLY because they are unschooled or in pain. One of the main reasons they do this is simply 'because they can'. The other big reason they do this is because people with good intentions get in their way and inadvertently 'cause' the bad behavior. This could be a person that inadvertently tightens the left rein every time they mount. Some, if not most horses, will learn to move their hip away as they are mounted. They are not unschooled or in pain. They are simply being taught the wrong thing. I can give you examples all day of people that think they are teaching a horse one thing while they are actually teaching them something else all together.

I have retrained enough of them and watched more than enough horses as they 'learned' some of these bad behaviors to know that many spoiled horses and many more horses with really bad behavior habits do them simply because they have done them before and want to continue to keep on doing them. Some horses will 'fight tooth and nail' to keep doing these bad behaviors. Others, just need effective correction and they develop the good behaviors very quickly.

With some horses, it only takes one time of a person NOT quickly correcting them for an unwanted bad behavior and they try to continue doing it every time they are in that situation. Other 'saintly horses' (usually older and kinder by nature), are much more 'forgiving' and let people do things badly many times before they finally need a 'tune-up' and some serious correction.

I have studied horse behavior for over 50 years and there is one thing that I take at face value without really 'knowing the reason' they do something. Horses like 'sameness'. So, when they are always handled competently and their handlers and riders never let them do anything wrong, they continue to behave that way unless there is a good reason for them not to. When they are allowed to go down-hill in their behavior, they try to continue doing things badly until they are given a really good reason to go back to doing them correctly. Some horses take a lot more severe correction than others. Some will go right back to the bad behavior when they get the tiniest opportunity and others stay 'honest' much easier. Some are inherently huge 'cheaters' while others are inherently much more 'forgiving and honest'. I am always looking for horses like the latter. They are the perfect horses for beginners. They are just hard to find.
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    04-01-2013, 09:57 AM
  #46
Weanling
The horses which learn an incorrect behavior is allowed to by lack of proper schooling/the rider is 'teaching' what they allow. Schooling continues for the life of the horse, it is not as much 'because they can' as the rider's actions create an unwanted result (which is then blamed on the horse. Riders always create and allow behaviors, good ones or unwanted/incorrect ones. The trainer needs to create different results, so the trainers job is to replace a negative with a positive (yes) answer. Certainly it is much easier to create a proper reaction in the first place than replace a tension filled one (like the rider holding and not even knowing they are driving (with their seats). To tell most people to use a severe correction (when then do not even know what created the improper one in the first place) is often a problem. If a horse is walking off, mount facing the wall (visual barrier). And it goes back to mounting and dismounting as job one, before movement. And another question is what is asked AFTER mounting. Most of the time perfect horses are more a reflection of initial training and clarity of methods.
     
    04-07-2013, 09:58 PM
  #47
Weanling
We had a great day today.

Apollo was very, very quiet today...I even needed to chase him to make him trot on a lunge line which was odd. He was even standing quietly to be saddled and didn't even flinch when I fastened his girth which was even more odd...he was just very relaxed and was the horse I remember meeting 3 months ago. I hand walked him around out on the grass, up and down the hills just bonding with him and he loved it. I've honestly never seen him this relaxed since I first brought him home...my friend came out and was riding her horse and convinced me to hop on Apollo. I got my helmet and hopped on (with her holding him) and sat for a couple seconds and he didn't even seem to notice...I hopped off and then back on with the same results. My friend hopped on twice as well and he was perfect :)

I think I need to spend more time bonding with him. I usually just go out groom him, work him and then put him back out to pasture and try not to baby him. I love on him while I'm grooming him, but I think having a couple hours of just hanging out or walking around relaxing and bonding every week will be good for us. I just worried so much about spoiling him that I never really spent enough time bonding with him.

I'm just over the moon happy. Tomorrow I'm going sit on him a couple times again and if he is doing well then I'm going to have my friend lead him around with me on him (I still don't trust him 100% and he killed my confidence when he threw me). I think it really helped having another horse with him too...I think the few times he was ridden at his previous home he was with another horse, so I think he felt more secure tonight with my friends horses there. Wish us luck tomorrow!
     
    04-07-2013, 10:14 PM
  #48
Trained
Good job with him on that day. Just remember that the "bond" you have with him needs to be between a lead horse (you) and a subordinate horse, (Apollo). If you confidence is gone, he will get worse if you are too afraid to deal with him properly. Sometimes you have to fake it until you make it. Keep in mind what you have to do to fix it, and don't give in until you get the desired response...Then reward him. Even me and my dead broke money earning mare have these discussions often. He may just be that type of horse who needs a strong rider. If you think you can be that, all power in the world to you and I wish you the best of luck because he will get better very quickly with that attitude. If you don't think you can do that, I believe it would be best for both of you to find partners better suited to your abilities. Either way will make you very happy in the end.
     
    04-08-2013, 09:30 AM
  #49
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
Good job with him on that day. Just remember that the "bond" you have with him needs to be between a lead horse (you) and a subordinate horse, (Apollo). If you confidence is gone, he will get worse if you are too afraid to deal with him properly. Sometimes you have to fake it until you make it. Keep in mind what you have to do to fix it, and don't give in until you get the desired response...Then reward him. Even me and my dead broke money earning mare have these discussions often. He may just be that type of horse who needs a strong rider. If you think you can be that, all power in the world to you and I wish you the best of luck because he will get better very quickly with that attitude. If you don't think you can do that, I believe it would be best for both of you to find partners better suited to your abilities. Either way will make you very happy in the end.
Thank you! I just need to get back into the swing of things and I will go back to my confident self...I already have more confidence on him after just sitting on him and him not caring, if he does that a couple more times I will feel confident enough to ride him by myself. I was one of those riders who would jump on the hottest or spookiest horse because I liked the challenge...I just wasn't expecting Apollo to take off and throw me because of how well he was doing the many rides before. If I knew he was a bucker I would have been more prepared and had my guard up, even though I knew I should ALWAYS have my guard up, I just wasn't expecting him to take off like that because he never had before...now I know the signs to look for, I know what calms him down and if I can get my seat before he takes off (he didn't let me before) I'm pretty confident I can sit through his bucks.

He is just a fearful horse...he must have gotten hurt the time he initially threw me. Thinking back, I think I tightened his girth too much too fast, and a little to far back because of the way he was standing, and it just psyched him out and it felt funny to him or hurt because of the nerve there. Since then he has been cinchy and paws when I reach for the girth...but now I tighten it just enough so the saddle wont slip and then I tighten it a little more after we start working and it is helping a lot and he is slowly becoming less cinchy...he didn't even paw at all yesterday and I did and undid the girth at least 5 times. I think a few more times of sitting on him and he will be back to his old self, and before I know it I'll be going on long trail rides under saddle.
     
    04-08-2013, 09:36 AM
  #50
Weanling
A photo from yesterday :)

     

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