Horse does almost everything else beautifully, except...
 
 

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Horse does almost everything else beautifully, except...

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        11-13-2010, 01:21 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Angry Horse does almost everything else beautifully, except...

    Recently purchased a 15 year old TB gelding. He is extremely lazy, and apparently has been his entire life (judging by his race charts, he stopped running completely shortly after coming out of the gate when he was a 2 yr old, and a lot of his other races read "tired out" or "no factor"... lol). That's no big deal, I like that he is laid back. He lets a TINY 10 year old girl trot him around the field with no problems (he is 16 hands). Of course every horse has flaws... and here are his most significant ones:

    When I have him tied where he can't see horses, he goes bonkers. Hollering, head high, ignores his handler... will sometimes paw, and he moves around constantly. I can usually get his attention if I grab a carrot stick and tap his rump with it and PUT him where I want him (standing correctly where he's tied) but as soon as I put it away he is back to acting up.

    When I ride him, I can ride him away from the horses just fine, at any gait/speed I want, without any problems at all. Even walking back, he doesn't fight. It's just if I stop him and ask him to stand still while he's out there. He won't do it. He'll back up, duck his head down, side-step... He won't try to take off, but he'll fight me. He hasn't reared or bucked or anything, but I want him to stand calmly.

    He has shown lots of little disrespectful habits like this since I've started working with him. Right now he's in the barn my himself where he can't see or interact with other horses. He usually stays out with everyone else, but tonight after bolting out of the barn to get to the other horses (running me over in the process) I decided I need him to get over this sourness. Not sure if secluding him for a while is the right route to take, which is why I'm asking for advice here.

    Thanks in advance!
         
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        11-13-2010, 01:39 AM
      #2
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Snookeys    
    Recently purchased a 15 year old TB gelding. He is extremely lazy, and apparently has been his entire life (judging by his race charts, he stopped running completely shortly after coming out of the gate when he was a 2 yr old, and a lot of his other races read "tired out" or "no factor"... lol). That's no big deal, I like that he is laid back. He lets a TINY 10 year old girl trot him around the field with no problems (he is 16 hands). Of course every horse has flaws... and here are his most significant ones:

    When I have him tied where he can't see horses, he goes bonkers. Hollering, head high, ignores his handler... will sometimes paw, and he moves around constantly. I can usually get his attention if I grab a carrot stick and tap his rump with it and PUT him where I want him (standing correctly where he's tied) but as soon as I put it away he is back to acting up.

    Unless he freaks out so bad you think he'll hurt himself, I would leave him tied until he decides that all that fuss gets him nowhere.

    When I ride him, I can ride him away from the horses just fine, at any gait/speed I want, without any problems at all. Even walking back, he doesn't fight. It's just if I stop him and ask him to stand still while he's out there. He won't do it. He'll back up, duck his head down, side-step... He won't try to take off, but he'll fight me. He hasn't reared or bucked or anything, but I want him to stand calmly.

    You could try to handle this in a Clinton Anderson "way"... by teaching him to flex laterally and do the one rein stop. Then every time he tries to take a step while you have im stopped, do a ORS. It may take a while, but eventually he'll get that he's going to get shut down every time he tries to move before you say so.
    Or, you could try the method of every time he tries to move, you make him work hard... circles, changing direction often, backing, etc. He'll soon realize that its easier to just stand still. Since he is on the lazy side, he may respond to this well...

    He has shown lots of little disrespectful habits like this since I've started working with him. Right now he's in the barn my himself where he can't see or interact with other horses. He usually stays out with everyone else, but tonight after bolting out of the barn to get to the other horses (running me over in the process) I decided I need him to get over this sourness. Not sure if secluding him for a while is the right route to take, which is why I'm asking for advice here.

    Keeping him inside isn't going to hurt anything.. he should settle by morning and realize it's not the end of the world. But it sounds like his ground manners need some attention more than anything. Under no cicumstances should he bolt OR run you over. He needs a serious lesson in some basic manners.

    Thanks in advance!

    Good luck with him! Maybe some others will have different ideas for you, also. :)
         
        11-13-2010, 02:39 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Thank you ImagineThat.

    I have left him tied to work out his own impatience several times. He never achieves the calm appropriate state that I want. If I force his attention upon me, he's fine. But if he's distracted, he can be a handful and starts pacing. It doesn't take much to get him paying attention; then again it doesn't take much to get him distracted.

    I do exactly what you described when I ride him. I turn him into the ORS and flex him. So far it has proved to be not working, as a matter of fact it gets him more excited (?). Once he stops and I release him from the flex, he starts up even worse than before. I think whenever I get him weaned from the other horses this won't be a problem anymore.

    I'm going to try and get video of him acting out like he does. I think it will better clarify what his problems are.

    Thanks again!
         
        11-13-2010, 07:47 AM
      #4
    Green Broke
    This can get worse and the more you try to physically stop him the more he will resist. So be very careful. You have to look at his point of view. Horses are naturally herd bound. One reason only, SAFETY! He isn't feeling safe with you or doesn't feel you are leader so he becomes nervous and upset. It is tough to break an instinct built in. But it can be done with time, patience, and leadership. You will not get him weaned from the others, but what you can do is to make wanting to be with the others work. I've said this a lot, but work him where he wants to be and let him rest where he gets nervous. Even in the barn being tied. Take him where he feels better and work him, then take him where you want him to stand tied to rest. For bolting and running you over needs a instant punishment, not one that he doesn't understand by separating him from his herd for a night. He could get hurt trying to get to his buddies. Next time he trys that with you, swiftly back his ass up, make his feet move. Continue to do this until he calms down for you to take him where you need to go. Stay consistent with that. Lastly, if you go out for a ride ( which he sounds like he's nice) and you want him to stand for a minute and he refuses and dances around, let him. Except under your terms! Make him move his feet if that's what he wants. Then after about 5 min try again to have him stand. Continue this and stay consistent until you reach your goal of him standing quietly. Maybe stay closer to home for the first couple of times for safety reasons. I hope this all makes sense. He sounds like a nice horse and if you nip this in the bud it will get better.
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        11-13-2010, 09:33 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    In my (small) experience, you have to keep the feet moving and the attention on you. If you need him to stop don't ask it for very long and keep his mind focused on you. When you let them stand and 'make' them 'relax' they are only letting their mind wander and thinking all kinds of scary things! Keep them moving! You said yourself that he is fine as long as he is riding and focused on you. Be patient, eventually it wont be an issue after he learns to trust you.
         

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