Horse doesn't respond to my cues to run? - Page 5
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Horse doesn't respond to my cues to run?

This is a discussion on Horse doesn't respond to my cues to run? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Pokey horse will not canter

Like Tree169Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-01-2014, 09:49 PM
  #41
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot    
Not sure I'd agree with that. Most lesson barns will have people at the canter as soon as they're safe proceed to it. Good balance, proper seat, quiet enough hands. Yes, it'll be on a pokey horse that is tolerant of all the mistakes that come along with a first canter, but the rider will canter nontheless.

In my experience most riders achieve that with 3-5 weeks of lessons, assuming once a week lessons with adequate progress during each. Some do it much quicker.

A good coach makes all the difference.
The bolded has been my experience, and I am far from known for my grace!!!!

Which of course doesn't mean we're good at it after 3-5 weeks....and the darn lesson horse will make you *WORK* for that canter. ;)
Meadow likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-01-2014, 10:52 PM
  #42
Trained
My DIL cantered on a lesson horse her second ride. That doesn't mean she had any business cantering on a non-lesson horse. And yes, folks progress at various rates, and those of us who start at 50 may well progress slower.

But what I wrote was what I saw: the large majority of riders getting lessons who were cantering when I watched were bouncing the canter, not riding it. And if one of them got on a horse who wasn't fully comfortable with cantering, I wouldn't expect the horse to canter right away, with enthusiasm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by demonwolfmoon    
...and the darn lesson horse will make you *WORK* for that canter. ;)
Yup. And my sympathy is with the darn lesson horse. This comment by maura reflects what I've seen:

Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
Riding the canter correctly and well in a full seat is difficult, and many more riders do it badly than do it well. As Allison stated above, it requires a degree of abdominal fitness, as well as correct position, relaxation and a good understanding of gait mechanics and how the horse's back moves. That's out of reach for a lot of recreational riders. I would much rather see an elementary or intermediate rider cantering in half seat, allowing the horse to move freely, than someone attempting and failing a full following seat and punishing the horse's back in the process.

There is nothing inherently insecure about riding the canter in half-seat or two point as long as the rider is in balance.
Riding the canter in half seat

I'm glad others have seen new riders gracefully flowing with the horse at a canter within weeks. That is NOT what I've seen.

If the OP is riding in a half-seat, I'll take my comment back. It was after reading maura's comment that I tried a canter in a half-seat, and found it much easier to do. But I'm not certain that is what the OP is attempting, and "someone attempting and failing a full following seat and punishing the horse's back in the process" is more in line with what I've seen. But I don't spend a lot of time watching students learn to ride, so maybe my experience is atypical.
Meadow likes this.
     
    01-01-2014, 11:33 PM
  #43
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
I'm glad others have seen new riders gracefully flowing with the horse at a canter within weeks. That is NOT what I've seen.
Your experience with horses is limited.

I've posted before that my family has owned a farm for over 50 years. Hundreds of students learned to ride there, and I'd say just about every one of them posted in their first lesson and cantered within weeks.
2BigReds and Meadow like this.
     
    01-01-2014, 11:37 PM
  #44
Foal
I agree with whoever said 1) reevaluate for pain, 2) put an experienced rider on her in the proper fitting equipment to see how she behaves for them, and 3) build her up to a lope from the ground. This is what I had to do with my gelding.
Most people would agree that good foundations start on the ground.

I would agree with getting lessons if you can. But do try to work on your form and seat.
loosie, 2BigReds and Meadow like this.
     
    01-01-2014, 11:46 PM
  #45
Green Broke
Only read the first page, but I will say if you don't know how to make the horse go fast, or what the proper cues are or how they are used, you may probably aren't ready to go fast. I'd find someone to work with. If she needs a tune up, which she probably does, get someone else to do it, then jump on. She may just be a lazy horse too, which you can work on with training, but won't change completely, or she may just be lazy because she needs a tune up.

Also, to build on the saddle fit comment, since she has been out of work and in poor condition she will need to build up her topline. Saddle fit is even more important in this case, but even with a perfect saddle that will still take time. Does she canter on the lunge?

Will read the in-between pages and check back in!
loosie and Meadow like this.
     
    01-02-2014, 12:31 AM
  #46
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by updownrider    
Your experience with horses is limited.

I've posted before that my family has owned a farm for over 50 years. Hundreds of students learned to ride there, and I'd say just about every one of them posted in their first lesson and cantered within weeks.
Yes, my experience is limited. However, I'm not a fool. Please notice what I wrote - "And when I've visited stables and watched students cantering, a lot more bounced the canter than rode the canter. I also saw folks trying to force their horse to canter while they were still pulling on his mouth, and wondering why he refused."

We had a French exchange student visit us this summer. He had ridden ponies some years earlier, but they were small ponies and he had not ridden in years. He took a turn riding Mia, and he cantered. Yes, he stayed on. Yes, she behaved herself - ears pinned as he bounced and hung on the reins, but she behaved herself. He didn't ride her again.

Yes, I know people often canter within a few rides, as my DIL did. The reason my DIL cantered on her second time on a horse was so she would learn it wasn't scary, and that if her horse cantered later on, to just ride him and not panic. But that did not mean she wasn't hard on his mouth and back while cantering. As I described - she bounced the canter. There is a big difference between staying on at a canter, and "someone attempting and [succeeding at] a full following seat and [not] punishing the horse's back in the process."

Now consider the OP's situation: "...I have been doing it regularly for about 2-2 1/2 months now but just started riding Cinder". And it seems Cinder is less than thrilled to canter or gallop. Could there be a link? Hmmm....

Without seeing her ride, I don't know. Staying on a canter is easy. Riding a full following seat and doing it well is not something I've seen many do within a couple of rides. And when it is not done well, some horses avoid it.

Post #34:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot    
It's that very bounce that may be causing her to refuse to pickup the canter/lope. Something you do work on in lessons is smoothly sitting the trot.
Post 37:
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonwolfmoon    
...That being said, if the horse isn't comfortable with the way you're riding, she may not canter. It's that simple. And if there's nothing wrong with saddle fit or the horse physically, it's entirely possible you need more riding experience and skill to be on this horse...
Post 39 (mine):
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
...And when I've visited stables and watched students cantering, a lot more bounced the canter than rode the canter. I also saw folks trying to force their horse to canter while they were still pulling on his mouth, and wondering why he refused...Thinking about when I was learning to ride, and watching my family members learn to ride - none of us had any business cantering before 9-12 months of riding...
Hmmm...I guess I'm missing what I wrote that is so radical. "...there are only two criteria of your position; a) are you in fluid balance and rhythm with your horse or not? B) does your seat enable you to control your horse efficiently?" - V.S. Littauer

Maybe my idea of what constitutes being "in fluid balance and rhythm with your horse" differs from others. And if you are not comfortable sitting the trot, then I think cantering should be for fear-avoidance only. Also - I've seen a lot of new riders posting the trot in a way that would make me pull them off of my horse. Doing it gently and fluidly seems to be harder than what the folks I've seen in southern Arizona normally achieve on their first lesson riding...
Meadow likes this.
     
    01-02-2014, 01:07 AM
  #47
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meadow    
That's what I was thinking earlier today. Luckily its not a crazy, all over the place, out of control bounce , but I can definitely see it being painful to take onto a higher speed.
You need to sit into the saddle to cue her to canter. You are getting stuck in that in between point that is very easy to get stuck in and very hard to get out of. You could teach her to run into the canter, but that bouncing will get worse, and I bet you would continue at the canter, and then you will have to teach her how NOT to run into the canter too.

At this point in time you have no business teaching a horse to canter. Why are YOU doing this? You have a horse of completely unknown history, and you put a beginner on her back to see if she canters. What if she has a complete meltdown? You could be seriously injured, and the horse could be ruined like this.

If these have experienced people why haven't they cantered her yet? Honestly, I would be extremely skeptical of any "teacher" who would let a beginner on a rescue horse to "run" when the horse has been ridden very minimally and only W/T. Not trying to diss, just trying to say maybe you should look into another teacher.

Keep on riding your other horse, work on getting you canter- the cue and how to ride it, and how to sit the canter properly. Keep on riding your mare W/T and have someone experienced ride and canter her to make sure everything is good there and to get her used to it as well. ONLY when you and the mare are completely comfortable separately should you be cantering together. For safety, and training (and fun!). Again, fact, at this point in time you are a beginner. We can only work off that. Get walk trot, then canter, then when those are 100% solid and can be controlled completely at different speeds, you can work on speed and "running".

And not to nitpick, just educate. "trot" and "jog" are the same thing. Even if you use the terms separately (trot is English, jog western) then technically jog is that extremely slow "hop" version of a trot. A jog is never faster than a trot. ;)
Meadow likes this.
     
    01-02-2014, 01:27 AM
  #48
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine    
You are in her mouth, your toes are down and that saddle in no way shape or form should be used on her. ...
Until you have some lessons, AND know what you don't know, you don't need to be doing anything from horseback..
Um... I take that back that no one's 'speaking down'. Re the first comments, IMO just phooeyness, that you can tell 2/3 of that from the avatar pic! OP may well be 'in her mouth', but you can't tell. Saddle may well be sh**e but come on, you can't even see it clearly, let alone tell it's fit from that angle!
bsms, 2BigReds, PunksTank and 1 others like this.
     
    01-02-2014, 01:31 AM
  #49
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine    
If that is you on her in the avatar picture?

You are in her mouth, your toes are down and that saddle in no way shape or form should be used on her.

You need lessons. And you should not be attempting to do anything with a horse when you know so little about what you are doing to begin with. Much less trying to run one.

I also have serious reservations about a "rescue" that would turn you loose with a horse in the first place, or anyone no better versed than you are in horses.

This is a living animal that has already had a bad break, and your "training" attempts could finish her off too.

Until you have some lessons, AND know what you don't know, you don't need to be doing anything from horseback.

The horse will pay the price for your ignorance.
Okay. From what I remember, the reins were not tight because I hadn't been corrected on them. My toes very well may have been down, but I have been working on that. I was told by the rescue volunteers that the saddle would be okay. I got negative feedback for using that saddle on her, so I will inform the staff as soon as I can. I am in lessons currently, and if I do something wrong, I am corrected. Yes, being new to riding I know little about the subject. Though, I was not going to go about training her until I had an experienced rider/trainer/owner ect.'s opinion. I wouldn't put any horse in danger knowingly. Before I do something with/on a horse, I check in to see if it is being done correctly. If not, I am corrected and shown how to do it the right way. Thank you for your opinion.
loosie likes this.
     
    01-02-2014, 01:38 AM
  #50
Green Broke
While I completely believe what you said (and good for you!)
You said that she "wouldn't" run.. so you have tried... were you asked to try?
Meadow likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rein cues vs. leg cues? mydaughtersgroom Horse Riding 7 03-25-2014 03:51 PM
Mule wont respond to leg cues JLane1 Horse Training 2 09-29-2012 03:40 PM
New barrel horse that doesn't run barrels? barrelracer516 Barrel Racing 11 04-08-2012 08:47 AM
Horse Doesn't Respond to Downward Transitions on Longeline - Need Help! harryhoudini Horse Training 3 06-23-2009 04:59 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0