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Horse Flips Out Dangerously When Tied

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  • Horse flips out step on rope
  • Horse flips out when tied

 
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    06-06-2011, 08:42 AM
  #11
Yearling
Everyone of the horses I've worked/handled/rode knew from being 9 years old to my being a 60+ year old when I gave them a verbal reprimand at a high verbal pitch knew exactally they'd done wrong. No, they don't understand the "spoken word", but they do understand the tone of the spoken word. As for instance, you could say any word or phrase in a "glowing word or in praise", but in a harsh punitive manner and the horse will know it is being chastised.
     
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    06-06-2011, 09:02 AM
  #12
Showing
While I don't agree that verbal reprimands don't work, I think in this situation you need a more direct approach.

I'd be hesitant as it isn't your horse but if it were mine, it would be taking a trip to the post of knowledge. If it was a training horse I had in, I would speak to the owner first. Have done this with a few outside as well, only had one owner who wasn't okay with it. Told owner to pick her up & bring her back when they fixed it, they brought her back a week later and she went to the post lol! I tie and let them fuss & work through it themselves. I have a telephone pole that is cemented in my pasture, on it is a tractor tire inner tube above head level, secured with brackets & lags so it can't work down. I tie to the tube, has some give when they fight but will not break. Doesn't take long for them to figure out if they stand still and move a step forward they relieve pressure themselves. Never had one hurt themselves or not fix the problem. I do monitor them & always have a knife in case but have never neede it.
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    06-06-2011, 09:21 AM
  #13
Foal
A barn owner I am going to lease from is the same way, doesn't like tying horses. Sad because some of the horses freak out in cross ties or when they step on their rope. Ugh.
     
    06-06-2011, 09:39 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters    
While I don't agree that verbal reprimands don't work, I think in this situation you need a more direct approach.

I'd be hesitant as it isn't your horse but if it were mine, it would be taking a trip to the post of knowledge. If it was a training horse I had in, I would speak to the owner first. Have done this with a few outside as well, only had one owner who wasn't okay with it. Told owner to pick her up & bring her back when they fixed it, they brought her back a week later and she went to the post lol! I tie and let them fuss & work through it themselves. I have a telephone pole that is cemented in my pasture, on it is a tractor tire inner tube above head level, secured with brackets & lags so it can't work down. I tie to the tube, has some give when they fight but will not break. Doesn't take long for them to figure out if they stand still and move a step forward they relieve pressure themselves. Never had one hurt themselves or not fix the problem. I do monitor them & always have a knife in case but have never neede it.
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^^^^I so totally agree with MHFQ. If the horse was mine or one I had been hired to work with I'd put it through the very same training method. Yes, the horse would stay there until it finally accepted it's being subdued even if it took 3 hours or 3 days. Of course, know the said horse would receive daily watering and feeding, though only hay at that point. "The Post of Knowledge" is a wonderful tool in training horses.
     
    06-06-2011, 09:40 AM
  #15
Showing
While I agree with the premise, I have two problems with tying completely fast with a rope halter:
- many people do not fit or tie a rope halter properly; when a horse sets back, the rope slips down and can restrict breathing
- rope halters are so thin, I do worry about poll and vertebral injuries
Myself - I'm a worrywart - I would likely invest in a Blocker Ring or inner tube that has some give to it. Some horses pull back because they know they can get free; others do it because they feel completely trapped.
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    06-06-2011, 10:01 AM
  #16
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseloverd2    
They don't understand? Any horse at our barn will respond with a simple "Quit it!" or "Eh!" Even my ultra sensitive mare listens to me when I snap at her. She knows any time I raise my voice she better straighten up real quick and respects that.

At least, that's my experience.
ALL of my critters know if I 'growl' at them, they had best knock it off.

Last night my mare was going to pull at the hitching post. A friend is riding her while her own horse is laid up. My mare likes to pull things on new people - 1200# and very imposing. As she started to pull I said KNOCK IT OFF in my growly voice and stood up (we were at thr picnic table between the outdoor rings.) Mare stood back up and turned to give me the stink eye. She didn't try it again.

Every horse on the property looks when I growl. My boarders find it hysterical.
     
    06-06-2011, 10:09 AM
  #17
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
While I agree with the premise, I have two problems with tying completely fast with a rope halter:
- many people do not fit or tie a rope halter properly; when a horse sets back, the rope slips down and can restrict breathing
- rope halters are so thin, I do worry about poll and vertebral injuries
Myself - I'm a worrywart - I would likely invest in a Blocker Ring or inner tube that has some give to it. Some horses pull back because they know they can get free; others do it because they feel completely trapped.
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Good point, JDI! I forgot to even add that. I never put them on the post in a rope halter for exactly the reasons you stated. I use a good old 3 ply nylon.
     
    06-06-2011, 10:16 AM
  #18
Green Broke
I believe the implied intention is that in THIS case hollering or waving your arms is extremely unlikely to be a viable option - the OP has already said this horse is nervous and spooky to begin with. Verbal cues only have the desired effect if a horse has learned the meaning behind them. Shouting KNOCK IT OFF at a range Mustang kicking the fence isn't going to accomplish a thing, except maybe to kick harder. It sounds like if this horse starts weaving, sudden action is likely to be the very thing that sets him off.

Both tying to a tree/inner tube and the blocker tie methods are typically the two "foolproof" methods that will fix a horse. A few horses will continue to fight after this, but it's somewhat rare in my opinion.
     
    06-06-2011, 10:18 AM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
While I agree with the premise, I have two problems with tying completely fast with a rope halter:
- many people do not fit or tie a rope halter properly; when a horse sets back, the rope slips down and can restrict breathing
- rope halters are so thin, I do worry about poll and vertebral injuries
Myself - I'm a worrywart - I would likely invest in a Blocker Ring or inner tube that has some give to it. Some horses pull back because they know they can get free; others do it because they feel completely trapped.
Posted via Mobile Device
Some rope halters are made of very thin nylon cord about 1/4 inch diamater, but others are made of a thicker cord like 1/2 inch or so. My rope halters are made of parachuete cord with the leads braided into them. I've never had a problem with the 1/2 inch nylon rope halters.
     
    06-06-2011, 10:26 AM
  #20
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
I believe the implied intention is that in THIS case hollering or waving your arms is extremely unlikely to be a viable option - the OP has already said this horse is nervous and spooky to begin with. Verbal cues only have the desired effect if a horse has learned the meaning behind them. Shouting KNOCK IT OFF at a range Mustang kicking the fence isn't going to accomplish a thing, except maybe to kick harder. It sounds like if this horse starts weaving, sudden action is likely to be the very thing that sets him off.
I am going to disagree. If you speak up at the right time, you break the concentration and distract the horse from the intent.
     

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