Horse-Human Bonding - Page 2
   

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Horse-Human Bonding

This is a discussion on Horse-Human Bonding within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
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    01-01-2009, 11:46 AM
  #11
Foal
When they trust you, then you will have a bond. You know they trust you when they follow you around or when they get scared they will look to you to see your expression, and how you react to the situation will rub off on them. Spending lots of time with them will improve your trust with them and their trust with you and a good way to build their trust in you is by leading them into new areas and when they begin to get scared you need to be the one to comfort them. Then once they have calmed down they can realize that you will help them through "scary" situations .
     
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    01-01-2009, 03:14 PM
  #12
Foal
Keeping dominate?

I've read that horses will continually challenge you to be the dominate one. If you bond with a horse do you find that is true? My dad had a horse from the time it was one year old, never lunged or round penned it and it was a wonderful horse. It didn't seem like he was continually challenging my dad.
We have had a horse for 2 months now and it just makes me wonder if it's a constant challenge. He seems to be a social horse, always sticking his head out and waiting for someone to visit him. But as another person said he does get distracted a lot!
I hope that we can build that bond with him. He is so sweet!
     
    01-01-2009, 08:21 PM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by aerobicv    
I've read that horses will continually challenge you to be the dominate one. If you bond with a horse do you find that is true? My dad had a horse from the time it was one year old, never lunged or round penned it and it was a wonderful horse. It didn't seem like he was continually challenging my dad.
We have had a horse for 2 months now and it just makes me wonder if it's a constant challenge. He seems to be a social horse, always sticking his head out and waiting for someone to visit him. But as another person said he does get distracted a lot!
I hope that we can build that bond with him. He is so sweet!
I don't think it's a challenging trouble at all. Once a horse trusts you he will understand you are the dominant and look to you for advice, not much to be bossed around, but kind of like him asking you for advice.
     
    01-04-2009, 07:34 AM
  #14
Weanling
Horses don't love. They don't give their heart away. They don't get broken hearts.

Horses "bond" to humans who show equine leadership characteristics. The strong a person is as a leader to their horse, the stronger the "bond" of that horse is to its human.

If you feel you are having a problem bonding with your horse, it's up to you to change your leadership abilities. Become more of a leader for your horse. Use your actions and body language to simulate the actions of a lead mare in a herd. Watch how his actions and body language change as you become a stronger leader for him.

All horses are looking for leadership, even the most dominate ones. A human needs to be able to recognize the differences between horses and change their leadership accordingly.

If you are really interested in this stuff, check out a fellow by the name of Marv Walker. Visit his website and request The Bonder via e-mail, then order one of his dvds.
     
    01-04-2009, 04:14 PM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaRide    
Horses don't love. They don't give their heart away. They don't get broken hearts.

Horses "bond" to humans who show equine leadership characteristics. The strong a person is as a leader to their horse, the stronger the "bond" of that horse is to its human.

If you feel you are having a problem bonding with your horse, it's up to you to change your leadership abilities. Become more of a leader for your horse. Use your actions and body language to simulate the actions of a lead mare in a herd. Watch how his actions and body language change as you become a stronger leader for him.

All horses are looking for leadership, even the most dominate ones. A human needs to be able to recognize the differences between horses and change their leadership accordingly.

If you are really interested in this stuff, check out a fellow by the name of Marv Walker. Visit his website and request The Bonder via e-mail, then order one of his dvds.
I disagree. I know many horses who would give their hearts out for humans they trust.
     
    01-04-2009, 05:04 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdun722    
I disagree. I know many horses who would give their hearts out for humans they trust.
You are giving human emotions to an animal that cannot possibly feel the same things as a human can. To us as humans, we see that the horse is giving his all for a human and the only way we can identify with it, or describe it, is to match it to an emotion that we can feel. Horses do not feel things the same way as we do. Their brains are not as developed as a human's brain.
     
    01-04-2009, 06:40 PM
  #17
Foal
Maybe their brains aren't like ours, but I beg to differ with you.

Horses can love and care for their humans. I have seen it and experienced it. My pony was my babysitter as a child. He saw to it that nothing happened to me, and was patient and kind.
     
    01-10-2009, 10:18 AM
  #18
Foal
bond

All my horses like people. When you go out to the pasture they come up to you.My palomino always leaves the herd to come to me. I don't feed treats either. I think it despends on how the horse was raised. I had a boarded horse that did not care for people. When ridden she did her job and then it was like ok leave me alone know. The girl thinks the horse loves her. Why does the horse run from her when she comes out then? And why did the horse attack her and bite her in the neck at a horse show? The horses last owner was kinda harsh with his training so I think she runs fast cause it was drilled into her to do that or else. On a possitive side my daughters horse likes to play games. When it come to getting caught she runs a circle around you and you have to cut her like cutting a cow. Then she lets you catch her and she all lovey to my daughter. The last game show we went to they did a jump and the horse jumped a whole stride before the jump. She should of knocked the jump but that horse did everthing in her power not to knock. My daughter got a first place in that event. I have two of my horses that I think I have a bond with. My Palomino and my yearling paint.
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    01-12-2009, 09:55 PM
  #19
Foal
I have a 20+ year old horse named Rooster (pictured here with me). I remember vividly the day I met him. I had come to look at him and I rode him for a couple of hours. Then I groomed him, gave him treats and put him back in his paddock. As I went to get into my car and leave (not sure that I was going to buy him), I heard the sweetest nicker coming from his direction. He was standing at the gate and saying goodbye to me. It was love from then on. I bought him and have had such a wonderful bond with him ever since. For example, today when I walked out into his paddock, he was laying down and soaking up the warm sun. I laid down in the grass with him and we looked eye-ball to eye-ball at each other for 20 minutes. I just told my old friend how much I loved him and stroked his face and I swear the horse was smiling back at me.
He is such a love I don't know what I'd ever do without him.
     
    01-12-2009, 10:06 PM
  #20
Yearling
I personally think it is the handler way of being or how they work with the horse. I bought Poco when he was 5 years old and he was known as "stupid", "lost minded", "stubburn", and just all around difficult to work with. I took the time to figure out more about him. Just sit around watch him and see how he works and how he manages himself. When I bought him he was a very mellow horse with a very laid back personality and didnt really "click" with his past two owners. I fell in love with him immediately and worked very hard each day to figure out how I could win him over in a way that he understood. Now, he is my baby. Pride and joy and everything in this world that I look forward to. He's a lovely mount and does everything with pride and is an all around joy to be with. I do believe that you can own two horses and have two totally different ways of training thim but still be able to carry that bond. I also believe that each horse bonds differently, some undersaddle, some on the ground, and some that you just have to work your tail off with for them to be able to come to you. My first horse was a different story she only wanted to go run cattle and barrel race. She was very distant from me and that was hard. I thought riding was everything at that time and it wasnt. It just seperated our bond. I finally started doing tons of ground work with her and lots and lots of grooming and I finally realized what it was like to have a horse that wanted to be with you.
     

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