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Horse Just gives up after a little work!

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        05-24-2013, 06:24 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Saddlebag, I have a clear bill of health from the vet my client brought with the horse.
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        05-25-2013, 04:12 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Some horses get worked up easier than others. It could be like Saddlebag suggested or a metabolism issue. I know some people that sweat easier than others. My dad is one and I used to be one.

    Another thing that came to mind is that she might be out of shape compared to the others. I know with our horses, the geldings play and mess around a lot more than our mares. It is normal for horses to be out of shape in the spring because they don't have to move around and graze. They sit with their head in a hay bale during winter.

    Some horses that I've worked with did get really sweaty the first few times. They don't understand at first what I'm trying to communicate. They really get worked up and get a mental sweat going on. Once I can get them to calm back down and figure it out, the sweating goes away.

    I would just keep an eye on her. Make sure to use clear cues, be consistent, and reward the smallest try she gives.
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        05-25-2013, 08:34 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by usandpets    
    Some horses get worked up easier than others. It could be like Saddlebag suggested or a metabolism issue. I know some people that sweat easier than others. My dad is one and I used to be one.

    Another thing that came to mind is that she might be out of shape compared to the others. I know with our horses, the geldings play and mess around a lot more than our mares. It is normal for horses to be out of shape in the spring because they don't have to move around and graze. They sit with their head in a hay bale during winter.

    Some horses that I've worked with did get really sweaty the first few times. They don't understand at first what I'm trying to communicate. They really get worked up and get a mental sweat going on. Once I can get them to calm back down and figure it out, the sweating goes away.

    I would just keep an eye on her. Make sure to use clear cues, be consistent, and reward the smallest try she gives.
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    Well from what she did today your about right! She is starting to get it and not get so worked up! She is just a slow learner and takes more to praise then getting on to her, all horses are individuals!!
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        05-27-2013, 07:41 PM
      #14
    Showing
    My horse Sky tends to get very sweaty when he is overwhelmed (in his head) and once you break things down for him, he is much calmer and such.

    Best of luck with the mare! I like Corporal's advice
         
        05-27-2013, 08:07 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    She's shutting down. Too much stimulation in a short period of time. Regardless of her age, it sounds like she really just isn't ready if she's acting like that. Spend some time brushing and spending time with her in lieu of a training session here and there and see if that helps. Handle her often but make it less 'high impact' since she's not ready for whatever it is you're doing.
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        05-27-2013, 10:52 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallee    
    Saddlebag, I have a clear bill of health from the vet my client brought with the horse.
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    But I'll bet the vet was just doing a general "health certificate" type checkup. Without knowing something was an issue to begin with, how would the vet know to look more thoroughly?

    If she sweats up that quick with very little work and seem out of sorts, I would have a vet out while the horse is being worked to specifically look for an undetermined health problem.

    Heavy sweating for little to no reason should always be looked into.
         
        05-28-2013, 04:01 AM
      #17
    Trained
    Agree with others, that it's worth ruling out physical issues, but I think she's 'overfaced' & mentally shutting down. Take things much slower & easier with her. If regardless what you do with her, she shuts down after a few minutes, this says that what you're doing is hard for her - make it easier & more rewarding & stop the session after only 2 minutes - however long you think before she freezes. That's not to say you only do 2 minutes a day though. You can always go back for another 2 minute session after a minute's stress free break.

    Oh & adding magnesium to her feed should also help
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        06-05-2013, 12:16 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    The mare is coming along now as an update! She has taught me so much, as the difficult ones always do! I slowed down with her and have been having short less strenuous sessions with her and it looks as if I am making head way now. I have her accepting a rider and ponying her around snubbed up to my gelding but no luck on complete forward motion on her own yet. What I am going to try to do is get someone in the pen with me to flag her around with me on her to establish forward movement.
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        06-05-2013, 12:51 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    Any horse I start, regardless of age, is called a training baby. Simply because the horse has been unhandled/trained by people. A 3 year old can have as much handling as a 15 year old if the 15 year old was never worked with. And so even though mature, the 15 year old has that untouched mentality of a 3 year old. They are mentally babies in training when they are first trained, no matter what the age.

    Keep that in mind. Age isn't much of a factor when training horses. Just because a horse is older doesn't meant it should know better until its been taught to know better.
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        06-05-2013, 02:49 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Copperhead    
    Any horse I start, regardless of age, is called a training baby. Simply because the horse has been unhandled/trained by people. A 3 year old can have as much handling as a 15 year old if the 15 year old was never worked with. And so even though mature, the 15 year old has that untouched mentality of a 3 year old. They are mentally babies in training when they are first trained, no matter what the age.

    Keep that in mind. Age isn't much of a factor when training horses. Just because a horse is older doesn't meant it should know better until its been taught to know better.
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    In my experience, younger horses catch on much faster.
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    aforred likes this.
         

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