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A horse that is just naughty??

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        01-24-2013, 11:11 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    You could hop off her and smack her and lunge her around for a few minutes, but it might make things worse, depending on the horse. I know I might get some flak for this one, but if she bucks more with the whip, get some spurs, ball bumpers are probably your best bet, when she bucks, either reach up and jab her shoulder, or just keep sticking her until she quits. And she will quickly. The minute she quits throwing a fit, quit spurring her. And just let her stand for a moment. I know there will be people who strongly disagree with this, but some horses need set in their place. I don't think she needs taken back to the ground, she needs an attitude adjustment and put back in her place..
         
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        01-24-2013, 11:12 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    I don't think getting off and smacking is good. Any kind of physical punishment has to be instantaneously connected to the action that you want the horse to know will bring negative consequences. By the time you get off and then smack, horse just got you off her (she wanted that) and then a crazy human is smacking her out of the blue. Makes no sense. That's why I would not use smacks on her butt unless you really can ride out the bucks that will follow. I could not, and I know it. So, since I cannot win that battle, I won't open it up in the first place.
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        01-24-2013, 11:24 PM
      #13
    Started
    Take control of her head. If you haven't already taught her a one-rein stop do that now (get her flexing on the ground first, then in the saddle). There are some good threads on the forum on how to teach and perform a ORS.

    At the first hint of a freak-out, take one rein and pull her nose round to your toe, with your hand moving toward your hip/lower back. At the same time, push her on with your "inside" leg (that is, the one on the side to which she is flexing) and disengage the hindquarters. As soon as you feel a drop in tension, bring the reins back to a normal position and ride her forward-forward-forward in a straight direction. This is a lot easier to do if you're wearing decent spurs, just don't use them behind the girth. If she's going forward she can't rear and it's a lot harder to buck. As soon as you feel her tense again (to buck) or get light in her front end (to rear), ORS again, disengage hindquarters and keep going. I was taught to ride along the arena wall (if you have an arena) and turn toward the wall. Keep doing this until she is going forward happily and without resistance or any suggestion of a buck or rear.

    Remember, reprimands must be fair, consistent, emotion-free and immediate. And good behaviour should be rewarded immediately too, with release of any pressure, a quiet word and maybe a pat or scratch.

    If you can, wear an approved protective vest (like the sort track and cross-country riders wear). And definitely wear a helmet. Good luck!
    nvr2many likes this.
         
        01-24-2013, 11:26 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
    Take control of her head. If you haven't already taught her a one-rein stop do that now (get her flexing on the ground first, then in the saddle). There are some good threads on the forum on how to teach and perform a ORS.

    At the first hint of a freak-out, take one rein and pull her nose round to your toe, with your hand moving toward your hip/lower back. At the same time, push her on with your "inside" leg (that is, the one on the side to which she is flexing) and disengage the hindquarters. As soon as you feel a drop in tension, bring the reins back to a normal position and ride her forward-forward-forward in a straight direction. This is a lot easier to do if you're wearing decent spurs, just don't use them behind the girth. If she's going forward she can't rear and it's a lot harder to buck. As soon as you feel her tense again (to buck) or get light in her front end (to rear), ORS again, disengage hindquarters and keep going. I was taught to ride along the arena wall (if you have an arena) and turn toward the wall. Keep doing this until she is going forward happily and without resistance or any suggestion of a buck or rear.

    Remember, reprimands must be fair, consistent, emotion-free and immediate. And good behaviour should be rewarded immediately too, with release of any pressure, a quiet word and maybe a pat or scratch.

    If you can, wear an approved protective vest (like the sort track and cross-country riders wear). And definitely wear a helmet. Good luck!
    This is good advice, although, I'm afraid if the horse has reared high enough to fall over, if you tied her nose around, she will pitch a fit and fall over on herself and you. Just be careful..
    nvr2many likes this.
         
        01-24-2013, 11:28 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    In my Honest opinion, I think you should go back to ground work, no riding, or little riding, until she respects you on the ground, any time any where! Do lunging, backing, keeping her out of your space, yeilding and responding to pressure anywhere on her body. Once you got all of that down, time to start getting her into riding again, do it as if you were breaking her all over again.

    From my own experience, she doesn't respect you. She doesn't think of you as her leader. I am still trying to get through with my own mare (she isn't broke though)
         
        01-24-2013, 11:28 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
    You could hop off her and smack her and lunge her around for a few minutes, but it might make things worse, depending on the horse. I know I might get some flak for this one, but if she bucks more with the whip, get some spurs, ball bumpers are probably your best bet, when she bucks, either reach up and jab her shoulder, or just keep sticking her until she quits. And she will quickly. The minute she quits throwing a fit, quit spurring her. And just let her stand for a moment. I know there will be people who strongly disagree with this, but some horses need set in their place. I don't think she needs taken back to the ground, she needs an attitude adjustment and put back in her place..
    Me and you deffinately think alike hahaha! While a horse is your best friend, your companion, and what you may revolve your life around, it is still an animal. And as a horse owner your horse should not rise above you, so yes she does need to be put in her place completely! I do have some ball bumper spurs at the moment, but I had originally just used them for motivation purposes. Now that I know another mechanism that I will be using them for though, I will have to get them back out this weekend haha:)

    I have one last question before I start though, I am moving barns next weekend. Do you think that I should keep up a strict "no attitude" training untill then, then after the move give her a little break and she how she does? Or do you think the second we get there and ride again that we should get right back on our training??
         
        01-24-2013, 11:31 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    If she's gets nervous about moving barns, I would at least give her a couple days to settle in. Whenever I get a new horse on the place, I just let them be horses for a couple days and don't even halter them, just so they get to know the place a little.
    nvr2many likes this.
         
        01-24-2013, 11:33 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
    This is good advice, although, I'm afraid if the horse has reared high enough to fall over, if you tied her nose around, she will pitch a fit and fall over on herself and you. Just be careful..
    we have used the mechanism she mentioned above as well, and got not the best results.... and yea your right actually, one of our problems during that training idea was that she would almost fall over on herself! She's.... a little crazy hahaha but hey, so am I!
         
        01-24-2013, 11:45 PM
      #19
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
    This is good advice, although, I'm afraid if the horse has reared high enough to fall over, if you tied her nose around, she will pitch a fit and fall over on herself and you. Just be careful..
    Well, you certainly wouldn't want to tie it around - it should be possible to let the rein go at any moment. I never tie horses heads (even sane ones) to anything, don't even like side-reins on the lunge for this very reason. If you bring the head round and disengage the hindquarters with your leg at the same time it generally gives you enough time to stop the problem before it starts, and also many horses' brains seem to stop "reacting" when asked to flex.

    If a horse is refusing to flex on one side for me (which Brock does sometimes if he's hellbent on making trouble) I'll immediately bring him round to flex the other side. That's never failed me, but it's important to teach it on the ground first (holding the reins at the height you would in the saddle) and ask until the horse gives fully. Once I've taught it there I practice it in the saddle with the horse when he's being good, to reinforce it. Once I've got a solid ORS and only then will I look to it as something to stop dangerous behaviour.

    I don't like rearers, I've had a few rear on me but after I found out my boyfriend broke his back when a horse reared and flipped on him, I've decided I have better things to do in life. Bucking's another story, I know how to fall properly and roll far away so if for some reason I can't prevent it there really isn't a huge risk (still a risk, obviously, and I certainly don't treat it lightly). But it doesn't matter how well you fall if a horse falls on top of you...
         
        01-24-2013, 11:47 PM
      #20
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsegirlalex    
    we have used the mechanism she mentioned above as well, and got not the best results.... and yea your right actually, one of our problems during that training idea was that she would almost fall over on herself! She's.... a little crazy hahaha but hey, so am I!
    OK, at what point were you using the ORS? Don't whatever you do use it during the incident. It has to be at the first sign of tension or uppishness, before even a hoof leaves the ground. Otherwise, yes, the horse will pull itself over.
         

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