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A horse that is just naughty??

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  • Elle wanstrom

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    01-24-2013, 11:51 PM
  #21
Yearling
Shoulda worded that differently. I didn't literally mean tie around, but I've had horses that when I pulled their head around, they flipped over in a split second, even with release of the rein. It works for most horses, but a few, especially the ones I've see have been really rank about it.
     
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    01-25-2013, 12:03 AM
  #22
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
Shoulda worded that differently. I didn't literally mean tie around, but I've had horses that when I pulled their head around, they flipped over in a split second, even with release of the rein. It works for most horses, but a few, especially the ones I've see have been really rank about it.
Interesting, never had that before! I'll keep an eye out for it! I can understand how it could happen, but that's the main reason why I teach it on the ground and in non-confrontational situations first, so the horse gets what I'm asking. Star resisted the first time I tried it with her under saddle so I went back to the ground and taught it there, she now gets what I'm asking. Although to be honest her bucks are so pathetic they don't present much of a problem anyway. Brock's on the other hand are massive bronco sorts so sitting them out isn't an option. Taking a whip to him anywhere behind the girthline will also just increase his attitude, he's a fight-over-flight sort so better to disengage him rather than directly confront him.

But I guess it's very much a case of individual horses. With any horses that buck or rear you're running a fair risk of a bad injury - probably best to pay someone else to break their silly necks for you lol.
     
    01-25-2013, 12:06 AM
  #23
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
OK, at what point were you using the ORS? Don't whatever you do use it during the incident. It has to be at the first sign of tension or uppishness, before even a hoof leaves the ground. Otherwise, yes, the horse will pull itself over.
like I said, I ride more for pleasure and have never had professional training, so it was my friend who led me onto the ORS haha! She just explained and worked us through turning the head to disengage the hindquarters, and then moving right back to where we were to keep moving. Talking about rearing though, I should have mentioned that the time she reared and flipped over, was only the second time she has ever reared with me, and the first was in that same day!

She is generally (and always ) a bucker and head tosser! But bucking is just as serious.

And I also have yet to reply to a post upon the idea of ground work. (i.e lunging, halter leading) but I know you mentioned it so I will just reply to you :)

During the period where she first got uvietis, you could not put her under the stress to ride. Thus we worked ALOTTT with lunging, and halter leading. That she does very well with. She will lunge perfectly, follow with or without a lead, stop on command, trot with or without a lead on command etc etc. so she has well rounded ground manners, she just needs to work on respecting me under saddle!
     
    01-25-2013, 12:12 AM
  #24
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
Interesting, never had that before! I'll keep an eye out for it! I can understand how it could happen, but that's the main reason why I teach it on the ground and in non-confrontational situations first, so the horse gets what I'm asking. Star resisted the first time I tried it with her under saddle so I went back to the ground and taught it there, she now gets what I'm asking. Although to be honest her bucks are so pathetic they don't present much of a problem anyway. Brock's on the other hand are massive bronco sorts so sitting them out isn't an option. Taking a whip to him anywhere behind the girthline will also just increase his attitude, he's a fight-over-flight sort so better to disengage him rather than directly confront him.

But I guess it's very much a case of individual horses. With any horses that buck or rear you're running a fair risk of a bad injury - probably best to pay someone else to break their silly necks for you lol.
What sucks is when your the person everyone brings their broncs too! LOL. Everybody's like, "Oh Elle, you like busting horses, ride this killer nag for me, and oh by the way, I want him broke in 30 days." Haha, but most horses I've seen will respond to it, it's just that certain "few" that change the rules.
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    01-25-2013, 12:20 AM
  #25
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
What sucks is when your the person everyone brings their broncs too! LOL. Everybody's like, "Oh Elle, you like busting horses, ride this killer nag for me, and oh by the way, I want him broke in 30 days." Haha, but most horses I've seen will respond to it, it's just that certain "few" that change the rules.
Heehee yes, I was going to send Brock to someone but no one would take my money so I sorted him myself - was stressing the entire time that I'd break something and wouldn't be able to work (and therefore wouldn't be able to feed him) but the worst I got was a broken toe and some concussion (from the initial incident that sent me down the training path). However next time I go to work with a horse I'll be getting full work and disability insurance LOL.
     
    01-25-2013, 12:23 AM
  #26
Weanling
I know that for the most part you've eliminated health issues, saddle fit, etc as a problem, but by chance... have you ever had a chiropractic adjustment on your horse? My horse became much more workable in the arena after his adjustment. Just a thought. :) Otherwise, I think everyone else has made great suggestions... I'm a fan of ground work for respect.
     
    01-25-2013, 12:28 AM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
Heehee yes, I was going to send Brock to someone but no one would take my money so I sorted him myself - was stressing the entire time that I'd break something and wouldn't be able to work (and therefore wouldn't be able to feed him) but the worst I got was a broken toe and some concussion (from the initial incident that sent me down the training path). However next time I go to work with a horse I'll be getting full work and disability insurance LOL.
Good you made it out with minor injuries!! I've had busted rips, a broken pelvis, torn rotator cuff, broken fingers, broken jaw, broken ankle, broken arm ruptured spleen...The list goes on forever! I'm still paying off hospital bills! And the hubby has about twice as many injuries as I do. Riding them yourself can sometimes cost a lot more than than paying somebody to do it!! Lol.
     
    01-25-2013, 12:33 AM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
Good you made it out with minor injuries!! I've had busted rips, a broken pelvis, torn rotator cuff, broken fingers, broken jaw, broken ankle, broken arm ruptured spleen...The list goes on forever! I'm still paying off hospital bills! And the hubby has about twice as many injuries as I do. Riding them yourself can sometimes cost a lot more than than paying somebody to do it!! Lol.
Ouch!! Luckily Australia has free healthcare so even if something did happen I wouldn't end up with a pile of bills. My main concern is my future ability to work (and obviously I'm not particularly keen on being confined to a bed or wheelchair for the rest of my life). I just wish I could have convinced someone to take my money and been without worries lol.

My boyfriend has pins in both his legs and his collarbone and a plate in his back from riding breakers, one of the pins in his leg pokes out when he moves it which is about enough to make me lose my dinner...
     
    01-25-2013, 12:34 AM
  #29
Started
You know I have a palomino mare who was acting just like your is. She would stop mid run and buck out of nowhere, she would refuse to walk forward and start rearing and crow hopping. Every time I rode her she always did something. And I thought man she is a bad girl like she had no training at all. But I thought well maybe she is in pain and I had the chiropractor come adjust her. She was out in a couple of places and after she was adjusted I haven't had a single crow hop or bad attitude in many months. So I'd have a chiropractor look her over instead of a vet you never know sometimes.
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    01-25-2013, 06:30 AM
  #30
Foal
Please consider getting a second opinion on vet work. In my time riding, I have had one horse unexpectedly flip over on me (he had been kind and quiet, walking on a loose rein up until that moment). The poor boy had kissing spines and as I shifted my weight in the saddle to check the girth I had caused him immense pain. This horse later returned to being comfortably ridden after time off and veterinary treatment with frequent monitoring to ensure that he was still comfortable.

Please work with a trainer. Horses who rear can kill people. You are very lucky to have walked away uninjured.

Other ideas:
What kind of bit are you riding her in? Perhaps focusing on having soft hands with a gentle bit, might allow her to move forward instead of up.

Does she exhibit the same behavior with other riders? In other types of tack?
     

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