horse leading
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

horse leading

This is a discussion on horse leading within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Leading race horses to paddock

Like Tree37Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-05-2013, 11:44 PM
  #1
Weanling
horse leading

Miover just leaving paddock..was pretty much good

Now miover on way back to paddock



I know my faults, I wasnt in control


The racehorses I lead are much better well behaved, but given they know the routine, and it is the same time same place the racehorses get lead to so they know what to do.


Miover hasnt been touched or worked in 2 months probably 3 months now

Problem is..the round yard and arena are accross the road,

I don't know if I should lead him or just ride him accross the road..he is quiet on trails...but this is a whole new area, new horses, new enviroment, and he is really fresh atm


Should I lead him to the round pen in a bridle where I have more control?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-06-2013, 12:23 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
I am not sure you would have more control in a bridle. The reins are much shorter, and mean that you don't have the distance that you can have , if needed, when a horse is on a long lead with a rope halter (my preferred method to lead a horse).

Overall, the horse is really close in on top of you much of the time. And he is not particularl aware of you, much less being particularl respectful of you.

All of your turns are to your left, meaning that you are always bringing him around TOWARD you. Maybe this is the way it's done with racehorses. I don't know. But, I would want to be able to turn the horse the other way; to the right and OUT of my space, makig him move away from me. I am also of the opinion that it's better to have the horse off to the side and behind me, at least no more forward than his nose up by my side, at most.

Also, if you are not sure, wear shoes with good toe protection, and wear gloves. I was leading a thbd some years back, out to the grass where he rarely got to graze. He reared up and ran off and I literally went grass skiing on my tummy. (one of those stupid things where your brain shuts down and you forget to LET GO!) Just for a sec, but it took off the skin of my hand in a huge chunk, down to the muscle. Very painful. Should have worn my gloves!
     
    06-06-2013, 12:35 AM
  #3
Weanling
Thanks for pointin that out to me...i am always bringing him towards me..maybe because its more comfortable LOL

I would not of relised that seriously!!!

I had a flimbsy lead rope its stretchy

No excuse tho LOL


I was being easy on him which is wrong as this was first time real grass in 8 days...he is out of that paddock on saturday and will be in with another horse.

I am back to step 1 with him as he hasnt been touched for 2 almost 3 if not 3 months


I can't beleive I do lead him towrds me when turning!!! Omg thaks for pointing that out!!!

The racehorses also get lead with rope around ur hand so if horse does play up, the horse doesnt get away..letting a million dollars go down the road.
     
    06-06-2013, 12:42 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
So, that was his first chance to graze in a long time? Poor baby. I'd be distracted too! That grass looks yummy!
     
    06-06-2013, 12:43 AM
  #5
Trained
Hi, you're going to post vids, it would be good to edit them to the relevant bits please.

So this is a new horse for you? I'm guessing you're pretty new to horses too? Have you got an instructor handy, or at least other experienced horsepeople you could ask for help from?

He is either not well trained to lead/yield, &/or he knows you're going to let him get away with that behaviour. So no, I would not be riding this horse until he & you understand the basics on the ground first. I also wouldn't bother about a bit, at least until I was sure he understood how to yield and you understood not to drag on the lead. I would however go to a rope halter - he'll be less motivated to lean on it - and a longer rope though. You need to be consistent with whatever 'manners' you want & don't allow him to get away with pulling you around.

But he can't learn that really if you're hanging onto the rope tightly all the time too. You need to give him slack whenever you're not specifically asking something of him, whenever he's doing Right. Because otherwise it's just nagging & he is learning to ignore you, become desensitised to the pressure. Also I think it would help if you didn't keep hassling him to move all the time for the hell of it.

I'd probably teach him the basics in the paddock and wouldn't take him out until he was responsive. I'd be first teaching him to 'respect' my space & not invade it. I tend to use the 'flailing arms' approach - just get big at swatting flies, swinging my arms around randomly, so the horse learns to stay out of the way, or *he'll get himself hit*. This is understood better & no offense taken compared to hitting out AT the horse.

I'd be ensuring he understood how to yield to direct pressure in a variety of ways - eg. Fingertip/halter pressure on his nose to back up, fingertips on his cheek/neck/shoulder & halter/lead pressure to yield his forehand over, fingertips on his flank or rump, & lead pressure towards his rump to yield HQ over. Then I'd teach him to respond to implied pressure - eg. A swung rope or whip, pointed finger, bodylanguage, etc.

Once he was good at that, then time to take him out safely. While I'd endeavor to teach him in as non-confrontational way as possible, especially because he's been allowed to drag you around, it may take a few 'heavy' cues to teach him that the rules have changed. Don't blame him, but do get 'big' enough to be effective. As he's learned to just pull against steady pressure, I think you will probably be best 'correcting' with some 'short, sharp shocks'. Eg if he begins to get ahead of you, drag on you, rather than going with it & continuing to drag, you can give a few sharp jerks on the lead, or use the tail of your long rope to smack his rump & get him to turn & face you. Be consistent with this in NEVER letting him walk over you, and ensure that whatever correction you use is strong enough to be effective, and you'll find you won't need many corrections.

And don't forget to reward him for doing the Right Things too!
Cherie likes this.
     
    06-06-2013, 12:48 AM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
He reared up and ran off and I literally went grass skiing on my tummy.
Yep, solid shoes would have helped you there!
     
    06-06-2013, 01:02 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Yep, solid shoes would have helped you there!

Huh? So I could ski on them better, right?


There's a lot more to leading a horse correctly than you'd think. It's absolutely fundamental to all other parts of training.

Here is just one video on the subject. Not by any means all the information a person could use on the subject, but Warwich Schiller is a very good mentor to investigate, IMO.

DimSum likes this.
     
    06-06-2013, 01:08 AM
  #8
Weanling
Lol he had more slack then ever think that was the problem LOL..i was using a rope halter?just wasnt the lead rope that matched the halter.


Tinyliny...yes he is in quarintine till saturday..and the rain caused all the the grass to be dug up, so its all just mud atm..he has chewed the whole fence post in his paddock

DSCN0512.jpg,

It has gotten worse its all around the paddock wood post..he isnt cribbing..he wood chews then eats it

So he is very bored in this paddock..and its hilly..so im excited for saturday before he breaks a leg from slipping in mud!
     
    06-06-2013, 01:09 AM
  #9
Weanling
I loooove warrick!
     
    06-06-2013, 01:22 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi, you're going to post vids, it would be good to edit them to the relevant bits please.

So this is a new horse for you? I'm guessing you're pretty new to horses too? Have you got an instructor handy, or at least other experienced horsepeople you could ask for help from?

He is either not well trained to lead/yield, &/or he knows you're going to let him get away with that behaviour. So no, I would not be riding this horse until he & you understand the basics on the ground first. I also wouldn't bother about a bit, at least until I was sure he understood how to yield and you understood not to drag on the lead. I would however go to a rope halter - he'll be less motivated to lean on it - and a longer rope though. You need to be consistent with whatever 'manners' you want & don't allow him to get away with pulling you around.

But he can't learn that really if you're hanging onto the rope tightly all the time too. You need to give him slack whenever you're not specifically asking something of him, whenever he's doing Right. Because otherwise it's just nagging & he is learning to ignore you, become desensitised to the pressure. Also I think it would help if you didn't keep hassling him to move all the time for the hell of it.

I'd probably teach him the basics in the paddock and wouldn't take him out until he was responsive. I'd be first teaching him to 'respect' my space & not invade it. I tend to use the 'flailing arms' approach - just get big at swatting flies, swinging my arms around randomly, so the horse learns to stay out of the way, or *he'll get himself hit*. This is understood better & no offense taken compared to hitting out AT the horse.

I'd be ensuring he understood how to yield to direct pressure in a variety of ways - eg. Fingertip/halter pressure on his nose to back up, fingertips on his cheek/neck/shoulder & halter/lead pressure to yield his forehand over, fingertips on his flank or rump, & lead pressure towards his rump to yield HQ over. Then I'd teach him to respond to implied pressure - eg. A swung rope or whip, pointed finger, bodylanguage, etc.

Once he was good at that, then time to take him out safely. While I'd endeavor to teach him in as non-confrontational way as possible, especially because he's been allowed to drag you around, it may take a few 'heavy' cues to teach him that the rules have changed. Don't blame him, but do get 'big' enough to be effective. As he's learned to just pull against steady pressure, I think you will probably be best 'correcting' with some 'short, sharp shocks'. Eg if he begins to get ahead of you, drag on you, rather than going with it & continuing to drag, you can give a few sharp jerks on the lead, or use the tail of your long rope to smack his rump & get him to turn & face you. Be consistent with this in NEVER letting him walk over you, and ensure that whatever correction you use is strong enough to be effective, and you'll find you won't need many corrections.

And don't forget to reward him for doing the Right Things too!

He does know how to leg yeild, back up and stuff he was previously in training for being a hack..but he has lost that..he was never worked on ground though,

He just refuses to listen

I've been doing carot exercisers but he seems more interested in carots that its hard to regain his focus...he will only eat carots, I've tried liqurish, apple,molassis, these apple biscut things I got from horseland, he doesnt eat them he just plays with it lol
He has only just learnt to eat carots lol

He backs up, with encouragment (like a tap on his chest)
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Horse lunging, leading and following. OliviaMyee Horse Training 12 06-06-2013 08:49 AM
Problems Leading my horse! EquestrianCowgirl4 Horse Talk 9 06-07-2012 11:12 PM
leading a horse roy Horse Talk 5 12-15-2011 03:04 PM
Trouble with leading my horse Librahorsegal Horse Training 12 11-30-2011 09:22 PM
leading problem w/new horse RhondaLynn Horse Training 6 05-12-2010 10:52 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0