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horse leading

This is a discussion on horse leading within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-06-2013, 06:29 AM
      #21
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Does it have to be "Oi!" .?
    Does for ACDC fans!
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
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        06-06-2013, 06:50 AM
      #22
    Weanling
    I always say OI seems habit LOL
         
        06-06-2013, 07:02 AM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    to dangerous in his paddock, I've already slipped over.
    OK so if it's safe for you to do so, take him straight out of the paddock to the pen on the other side, no messing about. If you can't do that, then IMO it's safer to stay in the paddock until you can. I don't know your situation, but you voiced concern about leading him across the road & I imagine there could be worse things than slipping over.

    Quote:
    i didnt see where I needed him to move???
    I don't get why you were walking around then. If you want help and think a video will show something relevant, you've got to... do something relevant in the vid. Not meaning to be sarcastic, I'm honestly puzzled by what you expect us to get from these vids.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBforever    
    he wasnt receiving any treats while leading,
    Yes, he was receiving them just for being. I have nothing at all against treats, but IMO if you're going to feed them, you might as well give them to him for Good Stuff & be very careful not to inadvertently reinforce Bad Stuff or for nothing.

    Quote:
    i usually do it the way we lead the racehorses and that's generally close like that
    Yes, you'll find you have more control, more leverage as well as more room to move, stay safe, get 'big' when necessary, if you use a long rope & don't hold it short & tight.
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        06-06-2013, 07:16 AM
      #24
    Weanling
    The last video was a week old....i was trying to show the difference in how he was out of his paddock, and when he is in the paddock,

    And how I would gain control to get him to the round pen which is accross the road,

    Tugging him seems to do diddley squat,

    Ill have help just have to wait till he gets out of quarintine
         
        06-06-2013, 07:28 AM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBforever    
    the last video was a week old....i was trying to show the difference in how he was out of his paddock, and when he is in the paddock,
    As you didn't ask anything of him, we don't really know what you can/can't do in/out of the paddock.

    Quote:
    and how I would gain control to get him to the round pen which is accross the road,
    That's my point. Ensure you know how before you try.

    Quote:
    tugging him seems to do diddley squat,
    Yes, you need to do whatever is effective. I think it sounds like on-site help is necessary here. Are there any trainers or instructors you can employ, or at least an experienced horseperson willing to help?
         
        06-06-2013, 07:36 AM
      #26
    Weanling
    Yeah I have a person that can come out and help, there is also an equistrian instructor down the road but they will also be top expence, and don't think they do onground lessons
         
        06-06-2013, 08:39 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    I would love to do free lunging in the pen, rather then a rope attached, but best stick with basics before doing that again
         
        06-06-2013, 08:39 AM
      #28
    Started
    I think many of us who have worked in racing or even some pony club people were taught to lead a horse in a deathgrip, a few inches from the halter with no release of pressure. While it may seem counterintuitive, you actually have more control when you have a slack lead. This is because the horse isn't being frustrated by constant pressure and eventually tuning out - instead you are using short, sharp pressure only when he plays up. Secondly, the horse will feel more relaxed because you are more relaxed. Thirdly, you won't end up fatiguing your arm.

    It goes against everything traditionally taught, I know, but leave slack in that leadrope. It took me two months before I decided to do this - actually, it was a tip from Mr HP of Horse Problems Australia, who had also grown up doing it the traditional English/Racing way and ended up deciding that the cowboy way of leading on a slack lead and using a long lead was way better. I'm not an adherent to any "system" but Mr HP has some really good tips for 'fixing' dangerous and disrespectful horses that I found very useful.

    Horse Problems Australia Leading the horse with control

    And yes, I know it's really difficult to do something a different way when you've been doing it one way for years. But I've discovered that quite a few practices coming from Stock and Western practices are actually better than the traditional European/English/Racing ways of doing things. Which is why next time I get back into riding I'm going to start switching between riding Western and English because I reckon the slack-rein approach of Western riding will break me of my pony club constant-contact hands and better prepare me for doing (lower level) classical dressage.
    loosie likes this.
         
        06-06-2013, 08:46 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
    I think many of us who have worked in racing or even some pony club people were taught to lead a horse in a deathgrip, a few inches from the halter with no release of pressure. While it may seem counterintuitive, you actually have more control when you have a slack lead. This is because the horse isn't being frustrated by constant pressure and eventually tuning out - instead you are using short, sharp pressure only when he plays up. Secondly, the horse will feel more relaxed because you are more relaxed. Thirdly, you won't end up fatiguing your arm.

    It goes against everything traditionally taught, I know, but leave slack in that leadrope. It took me two months before I decided to do this - actually, it was a tip from Mr HP of Horse Problems Australia, who had also grown up doing it the traditional English/Racing way and ended up deciding that the cowboy way of leading on a slack lead and using a long lead was way better. I'm not an adherent to any "system" but Mr HP has some really good tips for 'fixing' dangerous and disrespectful horses that I found very useful.

    Horse Problems Australia Leading the horse with control
    i watched that on horseproblems australia on youtube about the lead rope,giving it slack,

    I don't feel myself holding it tight its just where I keep my hand, as he sometimes drags behined me, or he goes way out in front,

    I think habit is holding him there so I can quick turn him when he does get to far ahead, which is habit, and how I was taught, doing the turn, same with in the saddle, doing the turn
         
        06-06-2013, 08:48 AM
      #30
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
    I think many of us who have worked in racing or even some pony club people were taught to lead a horse in a deathgrip, a few inches from the halter with no release of pressure. While it may seem counterintuitive, you actually have more control when you have a slack lead. This is because the horse isn't being frustrated by constant pressure and eventually tuning out - instead you are using short, sharp pressure only when he plays up. Secondly, the horse will feel more relaxed because you are more relaxed. Thirdly, you won't end up fatiguing your arm.

    It goes against everything traditionally taught, I know, but leave slack in that leadrope. It took me two months before I decided to do this - actually, it was a tip from Mr HP of Horse Problems Australia, who had also grown up doing it the traditional English/Racing way and ended up deciding that the cowboy way of leading on a slack lead and using a long lead was way better. I'm not an adherent to any "system" but Mr HP has some really good tips for 'fixing' dangerous and disrespectful horses that I found very useful.

    Horse Problems Australia Leading the horse with control

    And yes, I know it's really difficult to do something a different way when you've been doing it one way for years. But I've discovered that quite a few practices coming from Stock and Western practices are actually better than the traditional European/English/Racing ways of doing things. Which is why next time I get back into riding I'm going to start switching between riding Western and English because I reckon the slack-rein approach of Western riding will break me of my pony club constant-contact hands and better prepare me for doing (lower level) classical dressage.

    I only just relised the link after I posted LOL, its funny because I was just watching that yesterday
         

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