Horse leads then stops and wont move again!!!!!!!! - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Horse leads then stops and wont move again!!!!!!!!

This is a discussion on Horse leads then stops and wont move again!!!!!!!! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Why does my horse stop while walking
  • If a horse stops while leading what should you do

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-13-2011, 03:59 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
You can use a 1/4 inch nylon string. Take about 2 1/2 feet of it and tie a 2 " loop in each end. Make a slip knot out of the one end and tie it around the upper side ring on the right side of a flat nylon halter. Take the rest of this string and run it through the lower right side ring, under the horse's chin and out the lower left side ring. This leaves you a loop just outside of the left side ring of the halter. Snap your lead into this instead of the halter. It draws tight and is uncomfortable when the horse sulls or stops and it releases the instant he comes forward.

I have used this little trick to get horses into a barn when they did not want to go and to trailer load. It is so important to release when they step forward. This is the only 'reward' that they need. I have never seen one that this does not work on if applied properly. Remember, you cannot lose your temper and go to jerking on the string. Once you make a horse 'reactive', it will NOT learn until you let it settle down and go back to being 'responsive'.

The same can be done with a chain, but it is much more severe, so it gets many horses 'on the fight'. Since the chain does not release as quickly as the smooth string, I have found the string much more effective.

This is instant pressure and release if you quit pulling as soon as the horse steps forward. It does not take two people and it does not make a horse 'silly' or reactive.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-15-2011, 07:56 AM
  #12
Foal
That would be great if it works, I have never and would never hit him as I don't believe in it, I would tap him with the rope as a reinforcemnt but as you will know yourself if you have horses its the noise not the hit that makes the actual affect and sends the horse forward. I apriciate your photo but unfortunatly that hasn't worked with him and I found it rather dangerous and he wants to go back and my other horse stands there waiting for him to come forward so I'm neither nor in control of either of them, I belive I will reward him with attention when he is good and ignore him when he is not, I feel this will be the best way forward and form the strongest bond in the mean time as I want him ro follow me not my mare in the long run
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    02-15-2011, 08:46 AM
  #13
Weanling
Rather than use a war bridle, which is what you're doing when you put a rope through the rings in a nylon web halter, do what marecare suggests and use some psychology VS harsher equipment.

Perhaps some simple pressure/release using a halter would work. Stand in front of the horse, slowly but surely pull him towards you, and the moment he takes even a step forward, or even leans forward, release all pressure. Repeat the process untill the horse knows what to do when only a light pull is applied.

Do that lots.

Then when your horse lags behind while leading, stop, SLOWLY pull him towards you, but hesitate your release of the pressure untill your horse is trotting towards you. (you'll have to power walk/jog away from the horse to do such a thing) then once your horse is trotting towards you, slow back down to a normal walk.

If you've taught the submit to pressure as described in the 2nd paragraph well, then the "be even more submissive to pressure" lesson (3rd paragraph) will be easy, and will greatly improve how your horse leads.

And try to be as soft with your lead as possible, liken your lead rope while leading to your reins while riding. Avoid any jerking actions and always bring on any pressure slowly and release it the instant the right response is achieved.
     
    02-15-2011, 10:27 AM
  #14
Super Moderator
War bridle? Harsh? WOW! Is all I can say.

I have never seen anyone in 50 years of using a 'sugar string' that called 5# of pressure on string 'harsh'.

But, I guess there is a first time for everything. It replaces a chain, a whip, and most other methods that can truly be harsh.

Most other methods recommended here can result is a horse that gets afraid of a handler and starts running backwards or sideways away from the handler or at the least braces and raises the horse's head. The little benign string makes a horse just uncomfortable enough to want the pressure to release. It is not more uncomfortable than pulling on an ordinary halter --- it is just a NEW nerve in a NEW spot and the horse wants relief from it. I have not seen a horse that does not step forward and lead right after 1 short lesson.

It is not only effective; it is time effective and actually teaches leading.

Leading should mean leading -- anywhere, any time, any place. It is pressure on the halter (or at least some part of it) that should tell the horse that leading is not optional.
     
    02-15-2011, 12:47 PM
  #15
Foal
I like the very "Zen" approach discussed by Marecare. I like that concept and will try to incorporate it more in my training.

I think it is CA who says you contol the mind of a horse by controlling his feet. (rope halter, long lead) If I'm leading and my horse decides to just stop, I want him to understand it is much more fun and relaxing to walk nicely with me than to do his own thing. If I have the room, I will use the end of my lead rope to move him around me a few times in a tight circle (not hitting, just use the rope to impart the feel of moving his feet - ask, tell, demand). Or, I'll just double him back (immediately when he braces, I'll turn around and walk past him the other direction, bringing his head around and yielding his hip out of the way. Immediately reverse again (tight against his side) so he has to hip yield to turn, and walk on. If I'm on some narrow place (sidewalk, trail, etc.), I will start walking backward (saying "back, back, back") spinning the rope like a propeller in front of me. When I pass his nose (going backward), it is his choice to either back up, or run into my rope. Back him up 5 steps or so, and lead on. Lead with a purpose - we are GOING to the arena. Not mean, but direct. You can walk with me, or work a little harder, your choice, but we are going to the arena.

Make the right thing easy and the wrong thing hard. (another quote)
     
    02-15-2011, 01:34 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanyonCowboy    
I like the very "Zen" approach discussed by Marecare. I like that concept and will try to incorporate it more in my training.

I think it is CA who says you contol the mind of a horse by controlling his feet. (rope halter, long lead) If I'm leading and my horse decides to just stop, I want him to understand it is much more fun and relaxing to walk nicely with me than to do his own thing. If I have the room, I will use the end of my lead rope to move him around me a few times in a tight circle (not hitting, just use the rope to impart the feel of moving his feet - ask, tell, demand). Or, I'll just double him back (immediately when he braces, I'll turn around and walk past him the other direction, bringing his head around and yielding his hip out of the way. Immediately reverse again (tight against his side) so he has to hip yield to turn, and walk on. If I'm on some narrow place (sidewalk, trail, etc.), I will start walking backward (saying "back, back, back") spinning the rope like a propeller in front of me. When I pass his nose (going backward), it is his choice to either back up, or run into my rope. Back him up 5 steps or so, and lead on. Lead with a purpose - we are GOING to the arena. Not mean, but direct. You can walk with me, or work a little harder, your choice, but we are going to the arena.

Make the right thing easy and the wrong thing hard. (another quote)

Thank you CC,
It comes from too many years of Martial Arts classes..Ha!

I am going to post a few pictures here of leading and finding the impulsion.
The techniques here are Western and ranch based and I understand some will not approach it this way.
I am also not saying the OP has to do it this way and it is not the only way to do things.

In many cases I will have to move several horses at once and we are always having to go through some kind of gate.
The opportunity is always there for horses to "Squirt" through the gate and get the handler in a jam.
We spend a lot of time showing the horse or horses how to position themselves and to keep moving with the leader(me).

Giving the horse the freedom to move but teaching them where to be.


Two horses.

Three.
     
    02-15-2011, 01:57 PM
  #17
Foal
Tried that also and unfortunatly it didnt work, I found it rather dangerous actually as the colt stopped and started backing up and rearing as I had to try and keep control of my mare and the balsitic colt that didnt want to move forward, so a good thought but unfortunatly not one that worked for me. I always used contact as a reward I don't do treats only now and again as I do not want a nippy horse and I certainly do not hit my horse or show my frustration and try my best to keep calm and that just makes the situation worse, I find it much better to ingnore the bad and over praise the good.
     
    02-15-2011, 02:39 PM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nina    
Tried that also and unfortunatly it didnt work, I found it rather dangerous actually as the colt stopped and started backing up and rearing as I had to try and keep control of my mare and the balsitic colt that didnt want to move forward, so a good thought but unfortunatly not one that worked for me. I always used contact as a reward I don't do treats only now and again as I do not want a nippy horse and I certainly do not hit my horse or show my frustration and try my best to keep calm and that just makes the situation worse, I find it much better to ingnore the bad and over praise the good.

I have seen you post theses statements before and maybe if you were to post a picture of what you are doing it might help.
     
    02-15-2011, 02:47 PM
  #19
Foal
From the March, 2011 Western Horseman, Page 36:

"For example, a rider might want to simply lead a horse that is reluctant to leave the barn. As the horse slowly walks, the handler drags the horse along on a taut lead rope. The horse stops walking and the handler stops, puts slack in the lead rope and looks back at the horse. The handler has made the wrong thing (stopping) easy and the right thing (walking with slack in the lead line) difficult."

Just read it at lunch.
     
    02-15-2011, 03:14 PM
  #20
Yearling
I think something that would help a lot is if you have a trainer, or more experienced horse person, to show you what to do and give you tips as you try to do it.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Training a horse to pick up leads. Hunterjumper18 Horse Training 3 12-13-2010 09:08 AM
ex gaming horse hops when she stops...? Gidget Barrel Racing 7 08-22-2010 11:01 PM
Horse leads well at home, but has no respect in new places OrangeCat Horse Training 4 06-11-2010 11:56 AM
Barrel horse, not switching leads erikaharmony Horse Training 2 10-13-2009 09:26 AM
Diagonals, Leads, Changing Leads, Smooth Transitions... FutureVetGirl English Riding 4 08-29-2008 05:32 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0