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This horse may be too much for me!

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        01-06-2009, 02:09 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    I would try Clinton Andersons techniques. She needs to learn to respect you and your space.
         
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        01-06-2009, 04:07 PM
      #12
    Foal
    I don't think the filly is too much for you, she may be beginning to have feelings for the other horse and become herd bound. Is there a way you can switch her to a stall and paddock/pasture where she cannot see the other horse? You need to spend more time with her and keep her separated from seeing and contacting with other horses for a while so she can learn to think of you as her "herd mate" and will look forward to your visits.
         
        01-06-2009, 04:13 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Well, I could keep her in her stall and close the top door, but I think that would be kind of cruel. She'd never been stalled before Friday. The other horses come into the barn to eat and sleep anyway. There isn't a pasture on the property where she can't see the other horses. Later on this week, we are going to try putting her in the pasture with one of the other horses. I'm not sure if that will improve her behavior or make it worse.
         
        01-06-2009, 05:05 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Well, if you just got her she's probably just happy to have another horse around (your gelding). She's still trying to settle in, and she looks up to your gelding. He's like her rock, I guess.
    Don't worry, my friend had this same problem after she bought her mare and she met her gelding. It goes away after a while. You just need to get her to pay attention to YOU. You need to be the leader. I would continue with leading exercises, but be firm. If she starts to push you around then you have to make her understand that's not allowed. You don't just push the leader! Especially if she bites/kicks at you. If you were the lead horse, you would be doing the biting and kicking. Lol She has to start looking up to you instead of treating you like a horse lower on the totem pole than she is.
    Like I said keep doing the leading exercises. Lots of ground work and grooming time helps to.
    I would also let her go outside with the gelding or other horses. She'll more than likely just get worried/upset in the stall/barn by herself away from the others.
         
        01-06-2009, 05:22 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Thanks, white trash! (Never thought I'd say that without getting into a fight!)

    We were going to try turning her out with one of the geldings today, but I have to go get groceries after work, and by the time I'm done, there won't be much daylight left for us to supervise them. It'll have to wait until tomorrow.

    Both geldings belong to my friend. She has two - one is 18 and he is a sweetie. He isn't aggressive in the least little bit.

    The other one is 10, and he's the one that Bailey happened to form this magical bond with. However, he is a pushy horse and is head honcho between him and the 18 year old.

    Turning Bailey out with the 18 year old would probably be pretty drama-free. But it's the 10 year old that she wants to be close to. So I can't decide which horse she's going in with first. I only want to do one at a time. I'm leaning towards the 18 year old.
         
        01-06-2009, 05:32 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Colorado Dobes    
    thanks, white trash! (Never thought I'd say that without getting into a fight!)

    We were going to try turning her out with one of the geldings today, but I have to go get groceries after work, and by the time I'm done, there won't be much daylight left for us to supervise them. It'll have to wait until tomorrow.

    Both geldings belong to my friend. She has two - one is 18 and he is a sweetie. He isn't aggressive in the least little bit.

    The other one is 10, and he's the one that Bailey happened to form this magical bond with. However, he is a pushy horse and is head honcho between him and the 18 year old.

    Turning Bailey out with the 18 year old would probably be pretty drama-free. But it's the 10 year old that she wants to be close to. So I can't decide which horse she's going in with first. I only want to do one at a time. I'm leaning towards the 18 year old.

    Haha, you're welcome!

    I would also try turning her out with the 18 y/o. It's sounds like he's a really sweet guy, so like you said, no drama. She might even learn some manners from him.
    She probably likes the 10 y/o better just b/c he's the head honcho. Maybe introducing her to another more laid-back horse will calm her down.
         
        01-06-2009, 06:15 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Didn't you just recently bring her home? Horses take a while to adjust and will test you a lot (especially young horses) at first to make sure you are the one in charge. I would say a lot of ground work (preferably at a safe distance) is what you need so she knows you are in charge. A lot of other members have great ideas I would recommend trying those as well. I'm pretty sure this is just a passing phase though and you two will move through it quickly
         
        01-06-2009, 08:36 PM
      #18
    Started
    I agree with Mlkarel that she is probably just getting used to things. Many horses do tend to pick favourites... my horse has become inseperable with a gelding as well. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, for a horse to have a "buddy" but kicking and biting at you because of wanting to be near this buddy, is NOT OK, nor is it safe for you. She needs to respect your space. Esp. Since she's so young, it'll be really important to teach her boundaries so she won't develop bad habits.

    I'm not really sure what the remedy is because I've never worked with a horse that young before, or had to deal with a situation like that, but maybe you could get a trainer to help you with working on ground manners with her? I would work a lot at just turning her out and bringing her in. Even when you don't need to get her, bring her in anyways, and do it several times.

    I was going to say maybe putting her in another paddock, where she can't "talk" to his other horse... but at her age, she's bound to just get attached to someone else. I'm thinking its probably a lot to do with her youngness, being just recently separated from her mother, and needing some friendship.

    Sorry.. that probably wasn't the most helpful thing ever.
    Good luck!
         
        01-07-2009, 02:53 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    I would do a lot of groundwork with her and spend as much time making her think I am the boss, not her, not the gelding. I have a mare that I bought a couple years ago and one day she started running away from me when we went to catch her in the pasture. Well, I did the usual thing of chasing and cornering, and food bribing. Each worked temporarily, but after a while they did not work anymore. I got to the point where I thought in my head, if she wants to run away and not listen to me, then we are going to give her something to run from. The first day I had me and 3 others basically chase her around the pasture till it was not fun anymore. She got hot and sweaty and finally gave up. The next day I did the same thing with the plastic bag on a whip and chased her around until she gave up. Over a months time she went from taking an hour or more to catch to less than 5 minutes. In about 2 months all I had to do was walk out with a lead rope and she comes running to the gate now to see me. No treats, no bribing, no disrespect. She use to kick out and bite at me when she would run away, but all this has stopped since then. She would also walk ahead of me on the lead rope and try to run me over going into the barn and she has gotten over this, she needs a reminder sometimes, which I just take her back outside and we do it all over again until she gets it right. Over time, since she is new there, she will get better as long as you work with her on her manners. I would not seperate her from all the others, but when you are working with her try to get away from sight and sound of the other horses. Get her to focus on you, and only you, not the tree on the other side of the pasture.

    One of my mini mares live in the stall with my mini stallion. It is a similiar situation, he is her rock. If I am not around and he is not around that poor mare is lost. I have it worked out with her so that she is happy all the time even when he is not around because she sees me as herd boss. If I am there and so is he, she will listen to me over him. She is definitely boss mare of all my horses but Buck is her protector.

    Do not give up, it just takes a lot of time and groundwork to teach youngin's good manners. If she kicks out at you and runs away, give her something to run away from. Chase her until she tires out and gives up, that is what a lead mare would do to her for that kind of disrespect. You will know when she has had enough of being chased, because no matter what you do she will not run away anymore. In time she will come running when she sees you coming to the pasture. It is not fun being kicked, trust me I know! It hurts!

    If you have any questions feel free to PM me and I can answer them.
         
        01-07-2009, 10:58 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Thanks, everyone.

    I think I've decided that I am going to lay off of any "work" until she gets settled in a bit more. Last night I went and got her out of the pasture, brought her in the barn, and hand fed her some grain. I had my scoop tucked in my arm and was picking the grain out of the scoop and offering it to her in my hand. She wanted NOTHING to do with eating out of my hand at first, but when she figured out she wasn't getting to that scoop (and couldnt' fit her nose down in it anyway), she happily ate from my hand. After that, she didn't seem so nervous or prancy around me. I just petted her for a little bit, then put her in her stall and fed her.

    I just don't want her first experiences with me to be of me having to discipline her, so I think I'm going to lay off and see how she is after she gets settled in.

    Today we are going to put her in the pasture with the 18 year old and see how she does.
         

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