Horse with no prior hx suddenly reared up - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 13 Old 12-03-2013, 10:15 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central Missouri
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Contrary to popular believe, twisted snaffles are not harsh. With some horses they are the mildest bit you can use. However, you don't stop a horse by mouth pressure, unless you want to create problems, like the one you just found. Teach the horse to stop more with your seat and/or the one rein stop. You probably need to go back to ground work and get the proper whoa(stop).

It could be a tooth problem, but not likely, sounds more like it was an accident just waiting to happen, based on current stopping method.
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post #12 of 13 Old 12-03-2013, 11:04 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbsmfg3 View Post
Contrary to popular believe, twisted snaffles are not harsh. With some horses they are the mildest bit you can use. However, you don't stop a horse by mouth pressure, unless you want to create problems, like the one you just found. Teach the horse to stop more with your seat and/or the one rein stop. You probably need to go back to ground work and get the proper whoa(stop).

It could be a tooth problem, but not likely, sounds more like it was an accident just waiting to happen, based on current stopping method.
I disagree that twisted snaffles are not harsh. Its true that for some horses, it may be the right bit, but I think that is more uncommon than common. People usually use a twisted snaffle when they are having a hard time stopping a horse and they do it instead of working on the stop in training. If that is the case here, then I agree with you that it was an "accident just waiting to happen," because eventually, the harsh bit will not be enough or the horse will protest like this one.

I may be wrong about this since I know very little about this breed, but they strike me as sensitive horses. A sensitive horse does not do well with a harsh bit.

I would want to work with him in an arena focused on improving his stop. Every time he even slows down when I cue with seat and hand to stop, I would release pressure until he is stopping on a much lighter cue and gentler bit.
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post #13 of 13 Old 12-03-2013, 06:06 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
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Bits are only as harsh as the hands that use them - but pulling back on a twisted snaffle bit can have a much harsher effect than many other snaffles.

Your horse didn't "suddenly" rear. You pulled and pulled and the horse had nowhere to go but up.

Is this the only time he's been difficult to stop? If so then maybe it is situational.

If he's difficult or unresponsive other times then I'd probably start working on that, getting him responsive on the ground to the halter, stopping and backing up, flexing to each side. Then I'd get him responsive in the bridle on the ground, then start doing it under saddle.

You also need methods to deal with this. Always work with increasing pressure. If your doesn't respond to your maximum pressure the first time, then you've got nowhere to go. Consider teaching a one rein stop, circling etc.
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