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Horse is not respecting me

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  • How to stop weanling being cheeky
  • Cheeky weanling

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    05-17-2012, 03:28 PM
  #21
Green Broke
I agree that BOTH of you could benefit greatly from some professional assistance. There is a lot of miscommunication going on between you and Bert, and it is going to lead to disaster. What you see as him showing affection to you is actually him showing disrepect and dominance over you. The fact that he rears up on people is a huge red flag....regardless of whether you think he is "generally a sweeteheart" for you or not....what you want to write off as him being "cheeky" is him opening the door to what could very well injur or kill you left unchecked. As you are new to this and don't yet have the tools in your toolbox to read the horse an respond accordingly, you need to avail yourself of the knowledge and skills of someone who DOES and can help you gain those same skills. You are in over your head at this time.
smrobs and HagonNag like this.
     
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    05-17-2012, 03:28 PM
  #22
Weanling
No your not mistaken with other people he will rear but for me he will not he has never spooked or anything like that with me. He has never done realy anything to hurt me but he is cheeky he knows what he's doing wrong for an example grazing when not alowd but even if I put my foot under his nose or whatever he just doesnt care.... he's like that with everything he just doesnt give two ****s. As I am so new to bert its hard for me to learn.. without help (im more of a hands on learner) and the people at my barn don't realy help me at all even tho im sure they can see I need help.. bert not.. bad he's just cheeky and doesnt give a crap
     
    05-17-2012, 03:43 PM
  #23
Weanling
My suggestion, if you can't hire someone, is to get some form of Natural Horsemanship Training DVDs and start moving his behind. I like Clinton Anderson. Other people prefer other instructors. It doesn't matter who you choose as long as you learn the concept of making his feet move immediately when you say to move. Make him think he is going to die if he doesn't do what you say. He gets pushy, you make him move hard and fast. Back him up and put the fear of you in him.

If you watch a herd, the dominant horse will pull back their ears, snake their heads and then if the other horse doesn't move, they will attack by either trying to bite or kicking at them. This is how a horse learns who is boss. You don't have to cause damage, just make him think that you will if he tries any crap with you.
     
    05-17-2012, 03:51 PM
  #24
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by DressageDreamer    
My suggestion, if you can't hire someone, is to get some form of Natural Horsemanship Training DVDs and start moving his behind. I like Clinton Anderson. Other people prefer other instructors. It doesn't matter who you choose as long as you learn the concept of making his feet move immediately when you say to move. Make him think he is going to die if he doesn't do what you say. He gets pushy, you make him move hard and fast. Back him up and put the fear of you in him.

If you watch a herd, the dominant horse will pull back their ears, snake their heads and then if the other horse doesn't move, they will attack by either trying to bite or kicking at them. This is how a horse learns who is boss. You don't have to cause damage, just make him think that you will if he tries any crap with you.
I'm sorry, but a horse that has progressed to rearing up at people is NOT the horse to be fixed by a novice handler using DVD's.
HagonNag, DrumRunner and Daisy25 like this.
     
    05-17-2012, 03:57 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
I'm sorry, but a horse that has progressed to rearing up at people is NOT the horse to be fixed by a novice handler using DVD's.
I said if she couldn't hire someone. And, she needs to learn somewhere how to act around a horse. She isn't going to learn it by herself or by reading posts. She needs help and if she isn't finding a professional, then she needs to either get rid of the horse or learn how to act around a horse so she doesn't get herself killed.
HagonNag likes this.
     
    05-17-2012, 04:22 PM
  #26
Super Moderator
Many years ago a friend of mine had a horse that would chew anything he could get in his mouth - your clothes, with you in it, his blankets when not on him, and best of all his reins.

He was an ill mannered bargey horse and no one like to hold him whilst the owner walked the course at shows. Se could not leave him in the horsebox because he would paw and kick and he would not tie up outside without trying to kill himself.

At a show I got landed with holding him whilst the owner walked the course. As soon as I had the reins over his head he grabbed them and started to chew. I slapped him. Full strength, with the flat of my hand across his muzzle and yanked the reins back. His head went up and then he stood looking at me puzzled that he was stopped. He took the reins again and I repeated my actions. The third time he just took a rein in his lips but my reaction was the same.
He stood looking at me for several minutes and then dived his head down for grass. I pulled on one rein to get his head up but he only raised it about 2 inches before lowering it to continue eating.
Now, I could have really jerked on the rein so it hurt him but that could well bruise his mouth which I do not like so, I used my foot and gave him a short sharp kick on the front of his nose. He felt it as he was meant to but it did no damage, His head came up and after a minute he tried again. Ditto from me. He then stood still watching things going on around and about.
His owner had finished walking the course and was sat on the bonnet of her car drinking a coffee. I walked over and handed her the reins. As she took them so the horse snatched both into his mouth. He got an open handed slap from me but the best part was, he thought it was the owner who had done the punishment and he stood staring at her in shock. He never chewed his reins again

You need to get tougher with your horse. Insist on manners at all times and if you do not have control in a halter lead him in his bridle and if he will not raise his head from eating use your foot to get him to do so.
DressageDreamer likes this.
     
    05-17-2012, 06:40 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternRider    
no your not mistaken with other people he will rear but for me he will not he has never spooked or anything like that with me. He has never done realy anything to hurt me but he is cheeky he knows what he's doing wrong for an example grazing when not alowd but even if I put my foot under his nose or whatever he just doesnt care.... he's like that with everything he just doesnt give two ****s. As I am so new to bert its hard for me to learn.. without help (im more of a hands on learner) and the people at my barn don't realy help me at all even tho im sure they can see I need help.. bert not.. bad he's just cheeky and doesnt give a crap
What we are trying to tell you is that being "cheeky and not giving a crap" is basically being totally disrespectful towards you and will end up with you getting hurt. He may not have reared with you yet, because you may not have held him to the same standards of behaviour that others have. But when you do, he will rear!!! A horse who rears is a dangerous horse to deal with. I'm not a novice horse handler and I would NEVER attempt to deal with one who rears. You are in over your head.
Get help before you get hurt. You cannot be a hands on learner with a dangerous horse. It may be that the others at your barn do not want to "help" you because they don't want to deal with him either!!!

We seem to have a basic failure to communicate here. You're saying he's just cheeky and doesn't give a crap and we are trying to tell you that these sentiments translated into horse language basically means that someone, somewhere is going to get hurt! You have a 1,000 lb. Animal who doesn't respect you and could seriously hurt you even if he were well intentioned. He's NOT well-intentioned, you just said it: he doesn't care.
A cheeky horse is NOT the equivalent of a cheeky chihuahua!!

It is essential that he respects people. ESSENTIAL to your well-being and his. If you really care about this horse you will get a trainer to help you both before he hurts someone and/or gets a rotten reputation (or a worse one than he has right now.) I know you love him, but you have to know when you are overhorsed. You're there.
     
    05-17-2012, 06:53 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by HagonNag    
A cheeky horse is NOT the equivalent of a cheeky chihuahua!!
I almost spit my tea all over my monitor!

Very true....and you gave great advice. Thinking the horse needs a new home with someone more experienced or at least go to a professional trainer for a few months. In ANY case, the OP needs to learn more about horses and behavior so she can live to enjoy many years of horsemanship.
     
    05-17-2012, 07:20 PM
  #29
Weanling
.i now understand what you guys are talking about. I am trying to find someone who can help me and bert. Because I love this horse and I am going to try to do the best I can.... I can't loose another horse.. again (lost my first lease horse due to lameness he never got better and was taken away from me he and I had the closest bond ever)... im trying my hardest to do whats right.... probably sound like a complete morron. Its basic things we need to work on and I found out why he reared it was only once and it was because someone had put a chain on his nose and there was a tracter that scared the **** outa him
     
    05-17-2012, 08:35 PM
  #30
Weanling
If he is running away and not letting you catch him, make him run his a** off!

I bought a 7 yr old, untouched mare who would not let me near her when she saw the lead rope. So if she wanted to run from me, boy was she going to get to run! I would make her keep running (in a safe area) until she seemed she wanted to slow down and stop. I would stand still and let her stop, and try to approach her. If she moved away from me, I would make her run again, then let her stop and try approaching again. This process went on for about 30 minutes one day, once she was tired enough she gave up and let me catch her.

The very next day she wanted to avoid me again... I made her run and after trotting in a small circle twice she gave up and came right too me.
I see this posted on here all the time... "make the right thing easy and the wrong thing difficult"


You aren't going to hurt your horse by being tough with him, he is MUCH bigger than you are and he can hurt you a lot easier than you can hurt him.
apachiedragon likes this.
     

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