Horse Rears easily..?
   

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Horse Rears easily..?

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  • My horse is acting spoiled rears when he wants to go back to the other horses what should i do
  • My horse rears on the ground and bolts

 
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    05-21-2011, 01:26 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Horse Rears easily..?

Today me and my mom were riding in the field with out horses. I was on our 4 year old Andie and she was doing wonderful (Very curious I must add lol).

She was doing everything I asked but after a few minutes of riding she'd stop walking and toss her head as if saying 'i don't want to go anymore' I gave her a little nudge and she reared up a little. I don't know why she does this, maby just testing me but She also did it again when I was un tacking her. We don't bring her in the barn because she acts up so I had he standing whilt I took the saddle off.

She reared about 3 times and on one of them used her front legs a little and pawed out. I'm not sure if she's acting up or just acking like most 4 years olds do?

-Im an experianced rider but I get nervus when she does that because I'm not sure why or what is causing her to do that. Is there anyways I could get her to break that habit?

Thanks for the help and tips!;)
     
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    05-21-2011, 02:43 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Whatever her reasons, this is dangerous and unacceptable behavior. Especially rearing and pawing out (could be striking out at you?)

Since she is very young, you can work on training this out of her NOW! She is expressing impatience or anxiety or irritation. It doesn't matter, because she must not be allowed to do this.

AS for exactly how to train her out of this, I leave it to the other posters with more training experience than me. Just to say, not to overlook this and think it's cute behavior and curiosity. And be careful.
     
    05-21-2011, 02:48 PM
  #3
jdw
Weanling
I am curious about the solutions to this type of behavior. Horses that rear scare the crap out of me~DANGEROUS.
     
    05-21-2011, 03:29 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Just to say, not to overlook this and think it's cute behavior and curiosity.
As pretty as horses are when they rear at a good distance away- I'm more scared than thinking it's cute because she's a hefty girl and im hoping it's just her being impatient or irritation because she hasn't been ridden in a few months.
     
    05-22-2011, 03:43 AM
  #5
Foal
Heya Birtey a 15.2 horse is 5 yrs old and when ever im just loosejumping him he starts to rear and buck and when ever I try to go near him with the stick he nearly kicks me but the curious thing id he does that only in bad weather lol get the 4 yr old out of that habit :)
     
    05-22-2011, 03:49 AM
  #6
Banned
She is being a brat and demanding that things happen faster or more to her liking. It is not acceptable and you need to correct it before she gets any older.

I can't give you any advise without knowing what you already do? How do you react?
If you tell us that, then we can give advise as to how to move forward, but your horse needs to know you are the boss, and that has to be crystal clear.
     
    05-22-2011, 09:08 AM
  #7
Foal
When she rears I just get out of the way If im leading her or if im riding her, I turn her in a circle and make her go a different direction- sometimes circling her doesn't help either so we attack a lead rop and lead her around for a little bit so she doesn't think she can win. My mom is very cautious around her due to past injuries from a few months ago so we can't really crack down on her and make her quit that habit so when ever she rears, my mom is firm with her but you can tell she's nervus.
     
    05-22-2011, 12:53 PM
  #8
Yearling
Sounds like she is winning. Honestly rearing is something that if you don't stop immediately when it starts when they are young, you have a horse that will use rearing as an escape...forever.

Now how to stop is very difficult. Every horse is different and with rearing it typically takes some type of extreme measure that which one that will work is hard. Now "you should get a trainer" and "she might be too much for you to handle" are things none of us really want to hear. But I still think it should be thrown out there. Those are merely things to suggest for safety as trainers have the experience and none of us here want you hurt. But you are hear for more advice than that and I'll offer some.

I have a horse that is a rearer. Honestly that horse has almost killed me a few times over the past 8 years. I have gone through everything, but I didn't nip it in the butt early enough and now when ever he is in a pinch he rears. Through a lot of work and working around the issue, he hasn't reared in over 7 months. But its there, if anyone else other than me or my friend (who is a better rider than me and help me through his rearing phase) there is a huge threat for him to rear if they ask a lot from him or push him too hard.

On the ground when a horse rears I make them work and work and work. Lots of small circles at a trot, switch directions frequently and make her move! The same thing goes if she balks. Just make her move, lunge her in a circle every time she won't move forward, then act like nothing happened and try and move on. If that doesn't work keep doing it. This isn't turning in a circle, or walking. Horses don't want to work hard so they learn if they don't do something wrong they get to work hard, if the behave then they don't have to work hard. That's the nicest way I would suggest on the ground, since it sounds like you don't really want to get after her.

In the saddle its harder sense she is so green. I would suggest though doing the same thing if you can, but if not I would either smack her on the butt and just get her moving. Don't let her not go the way she is refusing to go. If it takes 30 minutes to get past there that's okay. You don't have to rush her into getting past her balking....which a lot of people try to do it fast and hard, which can create more resistance. Just keep end the day with her going past it.
     
    05-22-2011, 11:23 PM
  #9
Showing
When your circle her you are moving her front end. When a horse decides to rear you will feel it's body bunch as it rocks back and readies it's body for the lift. Whether on the ground or in the saddle it's the hindquarters you need to move, laterally. If her hind end is moving sideways that means one hind leg is always in the air. Pretty hard to rear with only one leg on the ground. Ie she's in all the wrong position to rear. Start with groundwork and moving her hip. Draw her head around a little. In order to straighten her neck she will have to move her hip three or four steps. Spend at least an hour daily for about a week before you ride her again then practise from the saddle. Just bend her head until you can easily see her eye and push your leg into her to move her butt. A step or two is good at first but the groundwork will help her better figure out what you want her to do.
     
    05-23-2011, 05:29 AM
  #10
Foal
I let them Commit (not a clinton follower but use that nugget) Sky used to be bad about rear up back and bolt. So, I let her flip herself over about 5 times one day (added pressure to make her back and bolt)

They want to rear up and back let them. Once they learn it will get no result if a fit... or they learn to trust you they wont be harmed.... its also a confidence thing.
     

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