horse riding
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

horse riding

This is a discussion on horse riding within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-10-2007, 05:07 PM
      #1
    Foal
    This is really an interesting question. My answer, I don't know. Christy does automatic lead changes. I ride trail, western. I don't show, she just always changes her leads when she needs to, didn't have to teach her that. (Hehe smart girl. .) I also do not prevent her from doing the changes. I leave her alone on that. When I ask for a turn, I shift position in the saddle, and look where I want to go and she takes if from there.

    Many, many years ago , when I had a TWH, I asked for a lead change by touching her shoulder with my toe. But, wow, that was like 30 years ago...
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-11-2007, 03:13 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Saddle position. Some people put the saddle to far up on the horse thus constricting proper movement. If the saddle it to far up then so are you. This will cause the horse to be off balance and heavy and make it harde to change leads or be on the correct lead.

    This just my theory but I could be wrong :)
         
        06-12-2007, 05:02 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jr
    Some good answers but there not exactly the ones I'm looking for so keep them coming :)
    Could you explain what you're asking a bit more? That might help. Also, are you looking for a specific answer or is no one really understanding the question?
         
        06-14-2007, 03:22 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Quote:
    puling a horses head to one side impedes his shoulder & balance his natural reaction is to try & change legs to retain balance, if he can't because you wont let him his ass will drift out to regain his balance
    Makes sense!

    The only time I turn Christy's head to the side is to circle her to prevent bucking / bolting. And of course, I am totally not paying attention to lead only to remaining in the saddle!
         
        06-14-2007, 04:12 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    Lets see you in action then??????

    Im affraid I am a little shocked at your attack on me in the draw reins post! I had not said anything nasty and did not deserve that at all!!

    I would like you to actually read what was said about my photos- I.e. The concorde mare, Winnetou isnt even 4yrs old yet and been backed for only 5weeks!!! Its amazing that she is even working in an outline at all!! Her technique over fences is developing and she rarely jumps at all due to her age. She balloons everything meaning yes I can get left behind but so too would you if you were sat on something that jumps a pole on the floor the same way she would 1m10 from a slow trot! Especially if you were as tense as me after having a horendous accident jumping some years back and only just getting back into it!!!

    Just be a little more careful and find out abit more about the person and their horse before you poo poo everything!!! It doesnt help anybody it just makes them less likely to ask for help in the future!

    Thanks for taking the time to read this....i don't mean offence at all but when somebody deliberately goes out of their way to be well......i can't help it,

    Elz x
         
        06-14-2007, 07:27 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Now, now, play nice!

    So, the topic has switched to draw reins huh?

    Ah, don't do those either...

    Personally I don't approve of draw reins. So, I don't use them. Wouldn't use them...

    I know many people use them, it is personal with me, I don't condem anyone. I just don't like to force a horse to place it's head in any position. I like natural. Whatever is comfy for the horse. If a horse doesn't have a headset that I like, I will look for a different horse, or a different breed... Just me.

    LOL, maybe it's that 1/16 native american comming through! Hehe.

    I know many people who use various methods, draw reins, harsh bits, over tight martingales, severe tie downs... I don't like to see it, but it is not my horse.

    Several years ago I watched a beautiful WB doing dressage with draw reins. Horse was having trouble breathing they were so severe, finally toward the end of the performance, the horse collapsed dead. The article in the newspaper said the horse had suffered lack of oxygen to the brain and heart, consequentily heart had stopped. The rider had a concussion, shattered leg, and broken arm. (This was before helmets.) I realize this is not standard, but it really made an impression on me. The horse was only 6.
         
        06-14-2007, 09:04 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Haven't gotten a chance to comment until now - tongue is still in tact.

    It makes me wonder on what basis one would pull a horse's head to the side to begin with? The horse is theoretically meant to bend around the rider's inside leg. Those who do not have the adequate flexion or bend will have a pulled around head and bend only directed with the rein, not the inside leg.
         
        06-15-2007, 06:37 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    Sweet Darling JR.....if you read what I have written and then what you have written I will beg to ask you who excatly sounds like they need to get over themselves!
    I am by no means a serious competion rider and my horses are my life long friends and hobby not my competion machines?? So you hate draw reins and think every horse owner is an idiot in one way or another.....boo hoo all im saying is you don't need to make personal attacks on people as it doesnt help anybody? Constructive critism is useful, direct attacks like "your seat is wrong" ISNT!!!! How can that be improved on???

    Anyway, Yeh I agree with people making the fundermental error of pulling the horses head in the dirrection in which they want it to go, as I was just going over that with my instructor yesterday. It restricts the movement from actually happening she was saying. I can't quite rememeber why but she said your better off asking for outside bend than inside if a horse wont turn adequately, as all it does is make to quarters swing away from the dirrection you want to go in, and unbalances the horse?

    But im no expert and I havnt read a library of books so don't pretend to be!!!! Just go by my own experiences, good and bad!
    ,
    Elz x
         
        06-15-2007, 11:22 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jr
    Yes I have read that in a book or two before on horse riding, they made very good door stops, what they forgot to mention in most of those books is for a horse to achieve this in a canter they has to lean there body weight off line in accordance to the radius, using there neck & head as a counter weight to balance, I will leave uses pondering this for a while before I move on :)
    As for your radius, what is your circle of reference? I'm trying to get the best understanding of what you are saying and it's difficult at times when communicating online.

    Canter departs are asked for in numerous ways - doesn't necessarily mean they are all correct, though. I believe several books go into the details of a correct bend, but few go into the details of a correct canter transition. Shame, really. It makes me wonder if this discussion is purposely avoided with authors?
         
        06-16-2007, 05:58 AM
      #10
    Weanling
    Do you not understand that it doesnt have to get ugly and that you can actually be dipplimatic and helpfully criticize somebody without being an ass?? Im am aware that you have upset quite a few people encluding kids on this forum so far but darling you don't worry me in the slightest!

    Never mind..... some people will never learn the art of dealing with human beings! Its not worth trying to educate some.....

    Theres an art to gaining respect from a person you see and darling you simply don't have it!!

    Anyway, thank you for that insightful post, unfortuanely for you I already knew that, my useless draw rein abusing coach had already got to the point!
    Later!

    Elz x
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:39 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0