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Horse training

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  • When i try and turn my pony she always trs to pull the other way how to stop this
  • Training tool for horses- taking away food

 
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    07-21-2010, 12:55 PM
  #1
Foal
Horse training

Okay I'm going to post all of my problems here

1. Walking off while you are getting on? Both the pony and horse do this and it doesn't bother me too much but we are thinking of giving the pony to my 7 year old brother and so it needs to be fixed so....
How do you get a horse to stand still while you are getting on?


2. Our pony will NOT come up to us! And we keep them in a big pasture so it's hard to chase them or keep them in a certin area. AS soon as we catch the horse the pony will go on the sidwe of the horse that we aren't on and will NOT come! I have to get on the horse and chase the pony and throw a ope around her neck because she won't come! So...
How do I get the pony to come up to me? Or at least not run away?

Thanks!
Helovesus.
     
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    07-21-2010, 01:09 PM
  #2
Yearling
1. Make sure you're holding your reins - or at least one when you mount. Line your horse up to the mounting block, and ask it to stand quietly... then get down and lead it away (before it moves on it's own)... do the same process but put your foot in the stirrup, while the horse is still standing quietly, take your foot out and lead the pony away. Repeat... and get on.

NEVER get on the pony if it has already started to move. Stop, get off, put it back to the starting place and try again.

If pony starts moving after you're up... ask it to disengage the hindquarter (like a turn on the forehand) by using one rein and a leg to push JUST THE HIPS over (do not just let pony walk in a circle... that's not "hard" enough). This is tougher for the horse than just walking off, but still allows their feet to move (in case it's a tension issue). You never want to make a "tense" horse stop and stand still - it really raises the chances of an explosion.

Keep things calm, happy, and remember to praise for every LITTLE thing pony does right. This process might take less than an hour, or it might take weeks - it depends on how good you are at timing praise and giving release.

2. I wonder if this pony is used to being caught, ridden, and released? Try taking a chair out there, and sit in the paddock awhile. Horses are generally curious by nature - and will eventually approach - take a good book and enjoy the time outdoors.

When Pony approaches, give a pat (treat if you want... I try not to use food, others like to do it - it doesn't matter so long as Pony has "earned" it) and walk away. Do this a few times. What you're doing is interrupting the "program" the pony is using and starting a new one. Eventually, that Pony is going to come looking for the praise, and when you begin to walk away should start to follow you. Just add the halter at this point and you should be good to go. Remember to follow up by sometimes just going out to say "hi", or catching him just to groom or spend time with him, don't just always halter-ride-release.
     
    07-21-2010, 01:22 PM
  #3
Showing
Sounds like all of your horses need remedial training.

Instead of trying to do it yourself, which from your posts it's obvious you're not qualified to do so, I'd recommend a professional before you or someone else in your family gets seriously hurt or dead.

Wouldn't hurt if you took lessons either, since a lot of a horse's issues can be directly linked back to the inexperience of its owner/rider.
     
    07-21-2010, 01:23 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I just bought a mare with big problems standing. I've tried holding the reins but the pressure either makes her turn or backup, not stand still. So what i've been doing is leaving the halter & rope on her & holding that while I get my foot in the stirrup (she responds better to that than a bit). When she's standing nice, I swing up & either stop/ turn her/ make her backup when she starts walking off. She's getting alot better.
You could also try putting your horses in a corner where they can't move forward or to the other side & get on&off repeatedly until they get the idea. (This could take alot of time & patience!)

As for catching, my friend has a gelding who is impossible to catch. They've chased him down with quads & other horses but he's learned ways to avoid/outsmart this now. So what she's been doing is going out in the field regularly with goodies & brushes & just getting him used to coming to her willingly. Then she started taking the rope out with her (not putting it on him!) to get him used to the sight. He usually comes to her no problem now, but if in doubt just bring a pail of goodies & when the other horses (or horse) starts following you around, the little guy will see he's getting all the treats & he'll want some!
     
    07-21-2010, 04:54 PM
  #5
Started
For standing: first check to make sure all equipment is fitting right. If the horse is uncomfortable they wont want to stand. If everything is ok this is how I teach my horses to stand: I like to leave the halter on and then put the bridle on over the top- check to make sure the bridle fits properly with the halter on. I will have reins that snap on and off easy, and a lunge whip and rope nearby. From either the ground or a stool make the horse stand square (or almost square) this will be easier for them with balancing, hold the reins in one hand up by the withers with enough pull that the horse feels it but not hard enough that they want to back.

Place your foot in the stirrup/iron- if at anytime the horse moves quickly hook the lunge line up to the halter and unsnap the reins and start lunging. I won’t make the horse work too hard- just a couple of minutes. Then put the reins back on and try mounting again. If the horse moves lunge again- each time increasing the intensity repeat until the horse will stand and let you on.

Once on I would greatly reward with petting on the neck and with voice. Walk around a bit, get off, and be done for the day. The next time you may have to repeat the routine but over time the horse will learn that it is harder work to move when someone is mounting versus just standing. The idea isn’t to tire them out by lunging- but to use lunging as a training tool. Don’t ever try getting on while the horse is darting away from underneath you because eventually you or someone else will get hurt (learned that the hard way in my early teen days). While there are many ways to train standing if nothing is working for you I would consult a trainer or someone that you know that has good horse training experience to help you.

For the Pony : Are you working him hard every time you get him? I ran into this problem with April this spring. We were riding a lot with a lot of hard work to get her ready for show season when I would get April (or she would walk up to me) and we would work really hard. After awhile I couldn’t catch her. So I had to take a step back and give her some time off from riding. I would go out to the barn and spend my entire time grooming her, practicing showmanship, etc… basically spending time with her without over working her or riding. Now she is back to her friendly self and doesn’t mind being caught- I just have to vary my activities with her to not burn her out.
While I have done the food method I’m not a fan of horses being “treat” trained. After awhile they will expect it and get very pushy because of it.
     
    07-21-2010, 05:18 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Sounds like all of your horses need remedial training.

Instead of trying to do it yourself, which from your posts it's obvious you're not qualified to do so, I'd recommend a professional before you or someone else in your family gets seriously hurt or dead.

Wouldn't hurt if you took lessons either, since a lot of a horse's issues can be directly linked back to the inexperience of its owner/rider.
at this point I don't have the $$ for a professional trainer or riding lessons

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    
1. Make sure you're holding your reins - or at least one when you mount. Line your horse up to the mounting block, and ask it to stand quietly... then get down and lead it away (before it moves on it's own)... do the same process but put your foot in the stirrup, while the horse is still standing quietly, take your foot out and lead the pony away. Repeat... and get on.

NEVER get on the pony if it has already started to move. Stop, get off, put it back to the starting place and try again.

If pony starts moving after you're up... ask it to disengage the hindquarter (like a turn on the forehand) by using one rein and a leg to push JUST THE HIPS over (do not just let pony walk in a circle... that's not "hard" enough). This is tougher for the horse than just walking off, but still allows their feet to move (in case it's a tension issue). You never want to make a "tense" horse stop and stand still - it really raises the chances of an explosion.

Keep things calm, happy, and remember to praise for every LITTLE thing pony does right. This process might take less than an hour, or it might take weeks - it depends on how good you are at timing praise and giving release.

2. I wonder if this pony is used to being caught, ridden, and released? Try taking a chair out there, and sit in the paddock awhile. Horses are generally curious by nature - and will eventually approach - take a good book and enjoy the time outdoors.

When Pony approaches, give a pat (treat if you want... I try not to use food, others like to do it - it doesn't matter so long as Pony has "earned" it) and walk away. Do this a few times. What you're doing is interrupting the "program" the pony is using and starting a new one. Eventually, that Pony is going to come looking for the praise, and when you begin to walk away should start to follow you. Just add the halter at this point and you should be good to go. Remember to follow up by sometimes just going out to say "hi", or catching him just to groom or spend time with him, don't just always halter-ride-release.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilruffian    
I just bought a mare with big problems standing. I've tried holding the reins but the pressure either makes her turn or backup, not stand still. So what i've been doing is leaving the halter & rope on her & holding that while I get my foot in the stirrup (she responds better to that than a bit). When she's standing nice, I swing up & either stop/ turn her/ make her backup when she starts walking off. She's getting alot better.
You could also try putting your horses in a corner where they can't move forward or to the other side & get on&off repeatedly until they get the idea. (This could take alot of time & patience!)

As for catching, my friend has a gelding who is impossible to catch. They've chased him down with quads & other horses but he's learned ways to avoid/outsmart this now. So what she's been doing is going out in the field regularly with goodies & brushes & just getting him used to coming to her willingly. Then she started taking the rope out with her (not putting it on him!) to get him used to the sight. He usually comes to her no problem now, but if in doubt just bring a pail of goodies & when the other horses (or horse) starts following you around, the little guy will see he's getting all the treats & he'll want some!
THANK YOU!!! All the advise is WONDERFUL!!! I will try it and see what works!!! THANK YOU!
     
    07-21-2010, 05:31 PM
  #7
Weanling
The other thing to watch for (it may have been said but I don't have time to read everything) is to make sure you aren't poking your toe into their side. Maker sure you are putting no pressure on the horse, otherwise you are telling them to move off. When they do move pull back on them. Also when you get on and if they have moved back them up a few steps sharply. Get off once they are standing still then get back on again. Keep doing this until they stand still.

As for the pony that won't let you catch them, do you feed any grain? If not then I would suggest getting a bucket with a handfull of grain, shake it so they hear it. When the pony comes give it a little grain, pet it and walk away. Do this for a while where you don't catch the pony Then move on to catching it...taking it out...give it some grain and put it back. Every once in a while throw in a ride but not always. Eventually stop bringing the bucket out, call the pony and when it comes take it in the barn (or wherever) and give it a little grain. Slowly reduce the times you give them grain until you can go for a few times where you don't have to give grain. Eventually they will just come.
     
    07-21-2010, 06:38 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvera    
The other thing to watch for (it may have been said but I don't have time to read everything) is to make sure you aren't poking your toe into their side. Maker sure you are putting no pressure on the horse, otherwise you are telling them to move off. When they do move pull back on them. Also when you get on and if they have moved back them up a few steps sharply. Get off once they are standing still then get back on again. Keep doing this until they stand still.

As for the pony that won't let you catch them, do you feed any grain? If not then I would suggest getting a bucket with a handfull of grain, shake it so they hear it. When the pony comes give it a little grain, pet it and walk away. Do this for a while where you don't catch the pony Then move on to catching it...taking it out...give it some grain and put it back. Every once in a while throw in a ride but not always. Eventually stop bringing the bucket out, call the pony and when it comes take it in the barn (or wherever) and give it a little grain. Slowly reduce the times you give them grain until you can go for a few times where you don't have to give grain. Eventually they will just come.
thanks :] this is all very helpful :]
     
    07-21-2010, 08:09 PM
  #9
Foal
I agree with what everyone else is saying, so I won't repeat them all haha but I'd just like to add that you should try reading your horse and listening to what he's telling you as well. Sometimes when we focus too much on what we want to happen we don't listen to what our horses are telling us. Get to know them better and understand them :) It always makes the job easier!
     
    07-22-2010, 05:03 PM
  #10
Foal
Thanks for all of the inputs :]
     

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