Horse will not move - any ideas?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Horse will not move - any ideas?

This is a discussion on Horse will not move - any ideas? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse will not go forward rears
  • Horses not moving

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-23-2008, 05:45 PM
  #1
Foal
Horse will not move - any ideas?

Hey all, I'm asking for some advice for a friend of mine. She's riding a Thoroughbred mare called Star who is about 14 I think (definitely 10+). The mare was previously ridden by a few members of our riding club but then she was turned away to pasture for a year as she became impossible to ride. My friend is currently trying to ride her again.

The problem with her is that she will not go forward. On the ground she is fine but once you get onto her back she simply will not budge. Trying to turn her doesnt work, nor does a crop, and if someone on the ground tries to lead her, she rears. I know it sounds like an impossible situation, but does anyone have any ideas or anything that might work?

(The horse does not belong to my friend, she's a blood donar at the hospital and she cannot leave the grounds so outside training or anything like that is not an option.)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-23-2008, 11:36 PM
  #2
Weanling
OMG, the same thing happened to me today. I was going to start a topic about it until I saw yours.

Anyway, let me start by saying I have a solution. Or at least this is what worked for me. The thoroughbred I was riding refused to go forward when I was in the saddle also. I tried kicking and slapping her with the reins, no effect. So I just started backing her up. I backed her a few steps, then I gave her a chance to move forward. She still wouldn't go forward, so I did it again. It took 4 or 5 times before she decided to move forward. Once she was moving forward I didn't have any more problems.

My logic here is that you have to get the horse moving somehow. She has to know that she can't get out of work simply by ignoring you. DO NOT get off or she wins. You make her move. It doesn't matter how she's moving or where she's going. As long as she's moving and working. Try it and let me know what happens.
     
    04-24-2008, 01:41 AM
  #3
Yearling
This isn't really a solution, but make sure your saddle isn't pressing on her withers. I've heard of a ton of TB stories that were caused by their high withers and saddles pressing them (but only when there was a rider on their back).
If that's no the problem, it seems like someones going to have to ride out a few bucks or rears... so make sure whoever is on her can!
     
    04-24-2008, 02:31 AM
  #4
Weanling
This may sound weird...just a suggestion

When you get on .....just sit there. Don't ask her to go any were, just sit for a bit. Kinda like you are hanging out.
After maby 10-15 minutes...or even longer if you wish, calmly ask for a few steps. Keep the reins nice and loose, so everything is relaxed. Stop her then repeat. If its working make the stop periods shorter.

But generally fist thing first.... her back really needs to be checked.

Also what was she doing that made her impossable to ride previously? Was it the same thing or something else?
     
    04-24-2008, 05:27 AM
  #5
Foal
Another one thing you may try, but only when you are sure you give the right aids and the horse does not have any health problem.

Horses can stand still for hours if they are in their relax time, but not forever. Especially not if its their own interest to move.

1. Try to sit on her in the correl she is kept in and ask someone else to put some food (hay) in the other corner of the correl. Don't let her go to the hay for some seconds, keep back with reins and after a while give her a "start walking" aid and let her go to the food and eat it. Repeat it more in the correl than outside.

2. Try to start her when more other horses are passing near to you. Horses don't like to be left alone by their fellows so you have a greater chance to start her than alone.
     
    04-24-2008, 06:36 AM
  #6
Showing
I'd be very careful about backing her up. Some horses may start rear (and she certainly knows how to do it since she rears when someone tries to lead her with the rider). Sounds like pain issue to me (saddle or bridle doesn't fit, or may be back issues). Have you try riding her bareback in say halter to see whether the problem is still there?
     
    04-24-2008, 12:00 PM
  #7
Foal
Just sit on her and wait till she moves without the rider asking.
Or maybe begin with her if she is just a horse who is 3 years old and starting with the training.
     
    04-24-2008, 04:01 PM
  #8
Started
The fact that she rears when someone simply tries to lead her makes me think there is pain involved. Make sure every piece of tack fits and that the saddle is shimmed correctly. Maybe have a chiro. And/or a massage therapist out. That's what I would do first.

If you can rule out all of that, I would ask her to back up, not hard or aggressive, just back her and then ask her to do a turn on the haunches and walk out the new direction. If you can get the horse to move SOMEHOW then you can direct her more easily.

I wouldn't just keep pushing harder and harder. She won't respond to kicking or smacking. It sounds like she just shuts down when the rider gets more aggressive so take a more laid back approach. Do less so your horse will do more, if you get what I mean.
     
    04-25-2008, 02:36 AM
  #9
Trained
I apologise in advance if I repeat anything as I didnt read any of the replies

My warmblood can have the same issues. He's not a very forward horse at all. Usually to get him going I let him stand for a second and comb the reins through my hands so that he brings his head onto the bit (dont ask me how this helps it just has for me). Once his head is down he tends to start to listen a tad more. Sit there for a second and then turn his head to one side. While you do this let your leg (on the same side) put some pressure back behind the girth. Push push push push bringing his head around with the reins and pushing back behind the girth ALWAYS makes him move. As soon as he starts moving I release ALL pressure on him and let him take a step or two. Then repeat. Keep changing directions and push push push push push he needs to know that it doesnt matter what he wants, he will move. Don't do it for long each time though. Give it five minutes and if he responds well finish off for the day and do something fun with him. But don't get off while things arent going well. If things are sucky just keep going until you get that 10 seconds that are good. Then hop off. Always reinforce to him that he did well so he starts to learn that if he does what he is asked he will get relief from the pressure.

Having said all that there are other issues that you could look at that may be causing this kind of behaviour.

* poor fitting saddle - if the saddle doesnt fit right and is putting pressure on him anywhere he may be in pain and trying to tell you so by acting out
* teeth/bit - have the horses teeth been floated recently? Sharp teeth can cause pain for the horse although this is usually made known by head throwing but still something to think about. Also, what kind of bit do you use?
* feet/legs - are his feet well looked after and up to date with trimmings/shoeing? Does he have any injuries on his legs or past injuries?
* back/shoulders/hips/neck/poll - this can be another cause of horses acting out. Chiropractors work wonders

Does your friend ride in a relaxed 'soft' manner or is she tense because of these issues? Does she have soft hands?

Obviously if you rule out any physical or riders issues there is only one option left: attitude. If its attitude, show no mercy. I don't mean go flogging the living daylights out of him to make him go because this will sour him more. What I mean by that is you don't have to go easy on him thinking its a physical issue. But, this is ONLY if ALL physical issues have been addressed.

The main idea is probably to go back to basics. Start again with a bunch of groundwork and balancing exercises. He needs to learn to be supple and willing and groundwork is one of the best ways to do this. He also needs trust and a bond with his rider. He needs to want to please and to want to go. The 7 games by parelli would be a great place to start. It teaches respect, bonds and establishes the rider as the dominant horse or herd leader. This is the key. You need to become lead mare cause no one messes with the lead mare :)

There are some videos in the instructional videos section (video section) that outline some of the 7 games. I havent checked since yesterday but there were a few on there and im pretty sure appy would have added a couple more by now. They are a great tool in training horses right

Is there any chance of getting some pics or video of what she is doing?
     
    04-25-2008, 02:45 AM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by daroczy
Another one thing you may try, but only when you are sure you give the right aids and the horse does not have any health problem.

Horses can stand still for hours if they are in their relax time, but not forever. Especially not if its their own interest to move.

1. Try to sit on her in the correl she is kept in and ask someone else to put some food (hay) in the other corner of the correl. Don't let her go to the hay for some seconds, keep back with reins and after a while give her a "start walking" aid and let her go to the food and eat it. Repeat it more in the correl than outside.

2. Try to start her when more other horses are passing near to you. Horses don't like to be left alone by their fellows so you have a greater chance to start her than alone.
i mean no offence by this but I wouldnt use food as the incentive. The last thing you want is a horse who wont do anything unless he is heading for a biscuit of hay.

He should be doing what he is asked because he wants to not because there is a biscuit of hay waiting for him in the corner. Food in this instance is a treat therefore he is being rewarded for only moving to go to his food. If I did that with my wb I would never get him moving again without food as he is so food orientated :)
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0