Horse's attitude problem
 
 

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Horse's attitude problem

This is a discussion on Horse's attitude problem within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Dealing with 'attitude' in horses
  • How to deal with a horse with attitude

 
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    12-14-2008, 03:45 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy Horse's attitude problem

I have a 3 years old horse that seems bothered when I ride him. I don't wear spurs and I'm getting him to learn that squeezing my legs on his ribs lightly means to start moving forward or going faster (trot, canter etc.). Getting him to walk has become no big deal at all, a very gental squeeze and he start walking and does that willingly. When wanting him to trot he needs a little bit harder squeeze (sometimes also clicks) and he does that but he seems to be bothered. His ears go back and low, he lifts his tail and sometimes even stops and kind of tries to kick my leg with his back leg. I put a lot of attention to what I'm doing while trotting- I don't kick him neither squeeze my legs on him, the reins not bouncing on him- nothing that I can spot. He has some attitude even when leading him - he tries to bit sometimes.

I don't want that attitude to become a habbit. :-\
How can I solve that attitude prob with him?

Thanks a lot!
     
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    12-14-2008, 04:12 PM
  #2
Zab
Yearling
With patiense. Just don't stop squeesing untill he does what you want, especialy not if he kicks at your leg.

Crow did the same thing, he just had to get used to being touched there. ;)

So unless he keeps kicking or throwing his head a lot or show other signs of dislike, just ignore it a it will go away. But don't you yid to it and remove your leg when he kicks. You just have a sensetive horse, try to keep him like that and you'll have a very nice horse to ride!

(Crow never kick anymore or look uncomfortable/angry, he speeds up with the slightest preassure.)
     
    12-14-2008, 05:13 PM
  #3
Foal
I have some questions for you.

Does your horse's tack fit for sure? Any other pain related issues that could include back pain?

There are several things that could come out at a trot but not at a walk.

Have you lunged or round penned the horse without tack, with tack, with and without another rider on top and not using leg cues? Tack can fit differently with the added pressure of a rider.

Do you do any groundwork? If so, is he respectful? Never mind, I just reread your post and you have said that he has attempted to bite you.

In that case, he needs a good deal more groundwork. Making him move his feet where you want is the best. Backing him up is humbling to a horse.

There are several ways to accomplish groundwork, you just need to find a method that you like.

The bad news is that you are worried about it becoming a habit, I would say it already is, the good news, it can be trained out of him with groundwork. (As you can guess, I believe in groundwork, lol.)

Three is very young, that is for sure, but, the longer it goes on the more the horse will think he's in charge and the leader.

I have seen people really get on a horse for pinning their ears, kicking at you while under saddle. You could ride it out if you want/can, but, I still prefer to handle it with ground work that transfers to the saddle. If you can fix it on the ground, your problems will be easier or even non existent under saddle.

There are many training dvd's out there to choose from.
     
    12-14-2008, 11:05 PM
  #4
Started
First you want to rule out and obvious health reasons. Tack fitting problems, dental work, sore muscles, tender feet/bad trim, etc...

I think health related issues aside your problems may be from the ground. If he has tried to bite you (As your post stated) and if you have ground manner problems he'll be sure to be naughty under saddle as well. Biting is often a spoiled horses behavior.

Also keeping in mind he is a 3 year old colt and he wont be perfect :)
     
    12-15-2008, 10:01 AM
  #5
Foal
He was trained but not very thoroughly and I do feel like I need to work with him some more on the ground. Though, I have problems controling him on the ground. :-\
I tried to do some backing up exercises but he just keeps coming at me. I tried waving hard with the whip but he just tries to eat it and doesn't care even when he's hit by it. I tried wiggling the rope alse and tell him "back, back" and he just keeps coming at me and tries to rub his forehead on me.

Is it good to use spray to back him up if he's afraid of it and after a while try to teach him gradually teach him to back up by wiggling the rope and by marching at him?...
     
    12-15-2008, 10:35 AM
  #6
Zab
Yearling
If you have that much problems on the ground, wait with riding. I somehow missed the biting thing and assumed the kicking against your leg aids was the only problem.

No, that would most probably just cause him to be afraid of the spray and you'll have problem with that later.

I'd say you need a trainer who can show you IRL.

When he rubs his forehead in this context, he's just saying ''you're just a rubbing pole I don't have to listen to.''

I'm not for hitting horses, but if you warn him (by waving the whip hard) and he doesn't listen at all, you have to go through with the warning and hit him hard. But I don't recommend you to do this alone, so much can go wrong and if a skilled trainer is there and sees you maybe he finds the smallest detail that will make the horse back without you even have to use the whip at all. With the kind of problems you describe, hitting the horse won't solve it since there is so much more that has to be corrected with your own attitude and ways. (I'm not saying your attitude is bad, just that you don't seem to show the right attitude to your horse since he won't listen and you sound a bit insecure about how to deal with it.)

Good luck.
     
    12-30-2008, 09:15 AM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
I'd say you need a trainer who can show you IRL.
What is IRL?

I understand that it's not the ideal thing for a novice horse to be around a novice rider\trainer but I just couldn't find any good professional trainer in my area. :-\ I'd love it if there was but there are almost nobody around here. The one that did do almost all the work with the horse till now wasn't fairly good and was pretty aggressive. He got the horse to do what he wanted, eventually, though, I didn't like his aggressiveness and it just didn't seem right or fair to my horse.

I understand that it's not the ideal thing for a novice horse to be around a novice rider\trainer but I just couldn't find any good professional trainer in my area. :-\ I'd love it if there was but there are almost nobody around here that does training. It's not as popular as in the UK or as in some places in the US. Unfortunately, Here it's really not that developed. The one that did do almost all the work with the horse till now wasn't fairly good and was pretty aggressive. He got the horse to do what he wanted, eventually, though, I didn't like his aggressiveness and it just didn't seem right or fair to my horse.

Now I have no other choise than to keep working with him by myself with some internet & forums advices. I'm very eager to do that and I'll put all I can into it. Whatever it takes, I'll do and give to this horse because I love him with all my heart and I have no doubt that it'll pay off in the end and I'm not willing to give up that easy. I do believe in every word I typed here.

Another question for finishing
I have a 8X14 meters of fenced square in my back yard. Do you guys think that lunging without a rope, there, will be a better start? I'd stand in the middle and make him run around, change directions and establishing leadership and gaining respect that way.

Thanks a lot guys!
     
    12-30-2008, 09:41 AM
  #8
Zab
Yearling
IRL in real life

But without someone experienced, you'll have a really hard time.
I had, and I've at least went throgh 3 years of horse 'high school'..

Good luck. It can be a good idea, if you do it right. It can lead to a very stressed horse, or in time, damaged joints if you do it wrong. :/

Just spend time with your horse, and be careful not to let him move you, and that he responds to every thing you say/do to him. If you get no reaction, demand it with gradually ''harsher''cues untill you get his attention at least. If he's trying to figure out what you want, but can't, just pet him and try something else while you figure how to get the response you hoped for. It's not good to 'reward' the wrong behaviour too much, but if you can't make him understand it's not fair to punish him for it either, or keep trying untill you're both frustrated :)
     
    12-30-2008, 09:49 AM
  #9
Foal
I really wish I'd have someone IRL to teach me all those things but ,as I said before, unfortunately, it's not as easy around here :-\

What about my question:
I have a 8X14 meters of fenced square in my back yard. Do you guys think that lunging without a rope, there, will be a better start? I'd stand in the middle and make him run around, change directions and establishing leadership and gaining respect that way.

Thanks
     
    12-30-2008, 10:14 AM
  #10
Zab
Yearling
I answered that in the other half of my last post and gave some advices ;)

But of course more points of views the better.
     

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