how to brake a horse by just doing groundwork - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

how to brake a horse by just doing groundwork

This is a discussion on how to brake a horse by just doing groundwork within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Ground work for the unbroken horse

Like Tree43Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-03-2013, 07:59 PM
  #11
Green Broke
I wouldn't say he is worth more if he is going to need some re-training or something no matter what he did in the past.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-03-2013, 08:04 PM
  #12
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by apachewhitesox    
I wouldn't say he is worth more if he is going to need some re-training or something no matter what he did in the past.

I understand that its just I knoe all of this stuff so all I need is help
     
    01-03-2013, 08:07 PM
  #13
Trained
Colour me confused for a moment. You're title asks if you can break a horse from the ground. So, is Bandit broken already and just fresh hence bucking with you'd dad, or is he unbroken and your dad (foolishly) decided to get on him?

If he's unbroken, no you can't break him without getting on him.
If he's already broken and simply fresh from his break in the paddock it would be good to know the circumstances. How experienced a rider is your dad? I know my own dad likes to exaggerate things regarding horses - if my horse has a flip out while I'm riding and my father sees it, he will go on about how my 'bronc' was leaping in the air 6 foot, with his head between his legs. When in fact it was a couple of tiny crow hops in protest to what I'm asking.
Possibly Bandit simply out in a few pigroots, which unseated your dad due to lack of experience rather than nastiness on the horse's part.

Because you are all scared of him now, I would not advise you to get on, though that is what he needs. If you get on him expecting him to buck you off, I assure you that he will buck you off.
Find an experienced friend who can stick on a horse without yanking it in the mouth, and that can ride forwards, and get them to work him a few times. In the meantime, start doing lots of basic ground control - backing up, yielding etc.

Be honest with potential buyers, you will need to drol the price if you can't even get on him to test for people. Breeding or a pretty colour means squat if he's broken but learned to buck people off.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-03-2013, 08:10 PM
  #14
Yearling
I would say to start from the ground. Just like you would with a young, untrained horse. Sometimes a horse that has been out to pasture for a long time needs a refresher course. Some don't, but he obviously does. How does he behave when being tacked? On the ground? Is the only problem that he bucks when someone is on his back? Did he buck when asked to go forward, or just when the weight was put on?
Another thing to consider is that he might have an injury. Have you made sure that this isn't brought on by something physical?
I have to say, I also think that the price you're asking is a bit high for a horse with any kind of problem, though... I would not pay that much for this horse.
     
    01-03-2013, 08:42 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by badger101    
Im sorry but this horse used to be a champion barrel racer, not tryin to be mean but this horse is worth more then what the price is.
That is way too much for a horse that hurt your dad. Let's be realistic here, the horse may have been a champion barrel horse. But he is not any longer and needs to be treated and priced like an unbroken or green broke horse. What I'm guessing may have happened is that your dad threw the saddle on Bandit, cut him in half and stepped on. Any horse that has been turned out for that long And brought in to ride has the likelihood of bucking. You need to start again from the ground, saddle him, but him up, work him around in the round pen. Soften him up, work on flexing. Get him soft in the face again so you can pull him up if he decides to buck. Maybe have your dad lead you around on his back to get him used to carrying weight again. Until you get this done, don't sell him as a champion barrel horse, that's asking for trouble, sell him as a once broken horse, in need of a refresher.
soenjer55 likes this.
     
    01-03-2013, 08:52 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by badger101
Im sorry but this horse used to be a champion barrel racer, not tryin to be mean but this horse is worth more then what the price is.
He USED to be worth more - but right now he is not. Right now he is not a champion barrel horse, he is a horse in need of some serious work (aka a project) and, as such, is not worth anything more than what the first sucker to come along is willing to give you.
     
    01-03-2013, 09:51 PM
  #17
Weanling
Start building your relationship with him on the ground, lounging, desensitzing etc...teach him to gain your respect first before you attempt to get on him...there is no such thing as a bad horse....
badger101 likes this.
     
    01-04-2013, 02:01 AM
  #18
Yearling
I think what the title should be "How to gain respect from your horse from the ground"
Yes there is lots of ground work you could do to get the horse to be more respectful, some horses need to be worked regularly or they become disrespectful by bucking/biting/rearing/etc.....so if the horse was left on pasture for a length of time he needs a good tuning up.
themacpack and badger101 like this.
     
    01-04-2013, 08:12 AM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by badger101    
Im sorry but this horse used to be a champion barrel racer, not tryin to be mean but this horse is worth more then what the price is.
As others have said, unfortunately a horse is only worth what someone will pay for it today. I'd start him from the ground up, and get a vet out there to rule out any pain issues.
     
    01-04-2013, 12:57 PM
  #20
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Colour me confused for a moment. You're title asks if you can break a horse from the ground. So, is Bandit broken already and just fresh hence bucking with you'd dad, or is he unbroken and your dad (foolishly) decided to get on him?

If he's unbroken, no you can't break him without getting on him.
If he's already broken and simply fresh from his break in the paddock it would be good to know the circumstances. How experienced a rider is your dad? I know my own dad likes to exaggerate things regarding horses - if my horse has a flip out while I'm riding and my father sees it, he will go on about how my 'bronc' was leaping in the air 6 foot, with his head between his legs. When in fact it was a couple of tiny crow hops in protest to what I'm asking.
Possibly Bandit simply out in a few pigroots, which unseated your dad due to lack of experience rather than nastiness on the horse's part.

Because you are all scared of him now, I would not advise you to get on, though that is what he needs. If you get on him expecting him to buck you off, I assure you that he will buck you off.
Find an experienced friend who can stick on a horse without yanking it in the mouth, and that can ride forwards, and get them to work him a few times. In the meantime, start doing lots of basic ground control - backing up, yielding etc.

Be honest with potential buyers, you will need to drol the price if you can't even get on him to test for people. Breeding or a pretty colour means squat if he's broken but learned to buck people off.
Posted via Mobile Device



My dad is very experinced its just ever since he started doing his flying business he didnt really have the time to ride but then I started rding and so I wanted a horse again so we got bandit he was broken and a well bred barrel horse but when I went with my mom for the summer he had to longs of a brake so we were lunging him everyday and putting the saddle on and taking it off then maybe a month or so later my dad got on him and bandit bucked my dad off my dad hurt his shoulder and lost his memory for about a day or two, (he is fine now so don't worry) but we are all afraid to get on him and we can't afford a trainer too.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electronic brake controller malfunction? franknbeans Horse Trailers 2 05-03-2012 04:59 PM
brake in anew colt roy Horse Talk 3 12-14-2011 12:45 AM
Electric Brake Contoller? HELP! Clementine Horse Trailers 22 12-08-2011 02:10 PM
How did you brake your horse to saddle?? travlingypsy Horse Training 10 11-04-2008 08:10 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0