How can you tell the difference if your horse is being friendly or pushy?
 
 

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How can you tell the difference if your horse is being friendly or pushy?

This is a discussion on How can you tell the difference if your horse is being friendly or pushy? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What does it mean if my horse is pushy
  • How to tell if a horse is being friendly

 
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    01-02-2012, 10:32 AM
  #1
Foal
How can you tell the difference if your horse is being friendly or pushy?

Sometimes when I am grooming my horse, my horse pushes his head twords me and nudges me/ pushes on me. Is he just being nice or is he doing that to invade my space and being disrespectful?
     
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    01-02-2012, 10:40 AM
  #2
Yearling
Some of this will depend of his body langauge, and some will depend of what uyou will tolerate. When I am grooming, or just hanging out, my horse will rub his head on me. Usually its a sign of him asking me to scratch his head. I'm fine with it then. During training time its a no no and I havent had any problems. He has almost pushedm e over and gets corrected for that.

Some people don't like it, and for a multiple person horse, I wouldnt allow it. I personally think its cute, its up to you though.
     
    01-02-2012, 11:04 AM
  #3
Showing
For me it would be disrespect. I'm very particular and strict about personal space though. Some folks don't mind, I'm just not one of those people. Mine get loved on a lot and I do let them rest their heads against me occasionally for a good scratch but only when invited to do so, never of their own accord.
     
    01-02-2012, 12:20 PM
  #4
Foal
Well only had mine for a few days but I am getting to know the difference with him he does both lol. When I am grooming or scratching him he will kind of bump my hand where he wants to be scratched like a dog "thats the spot" lol When I am walking him on lead he pushes his shoulder on me and pushes I do Not allow that, he has made some real progress on the last though and has almost completely stopped since we have been working on it. Just depends on the horse My mare does neither but maybe with time and trust she will nudge for a scratch lol.
     
    01-02-2012, 08:29 PM
  #5
Trained
Sounds like you are personifying a horse. Horse's don't do things to be nice. They do things they want to do and need to be told yes they can or no they cannot. It's a disrespect issue. Stop it before he slams you into a wall. Just a quick flick of your fingers to show him you are quicker than he is should do it. Be consistent. Either let him do it all the time or none. Nothing in between will work.
     
    01-02-2012, 08:55 PM
  #6
Weanling
I would say he is trying to groom you back, which can be interpreted in a few different ways. It is a sign of respect (horses that respect each other groom each other). I feel it is disrespectful for him to enter my space unless I have invited him. I teach all my horses that it is not ok. It is a personal preference but I don't let my horses do it.
     
    01-02-2012, 09:13 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Sounds like you are personifying a horse. Horse's don't do things to be nice. They do things they want to do and need to be told yes they can or no they cannot. It's a disrespect issue. Stop it before he slams you into a wall. Just a quick flick of your fingers to show him you are quicker than he is should do it. Be consistent. Either let him do it all the time or none. Nothing in between will work.


You know, in theory I agree. In practise, I fail at this. I think it's because Mac is capable of a middle ground, where he touches me with his muzzle to "connect" with me. He has gotten pushy on the ground and I have firmly rebuked him. And like I said, it would be smarter to disalow him any rubbing on me or snuffling me. But as long as he is pretty mellow about it, I admit to lettin him. When he starts to get too strong, I remind him to quit. I know, this is not good horsemanship. I confess!
     
    01-02-2012, 09:21 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
You know, in theory I agree. In practise, I fail at this. I think it's because Mac is capable of a middle ground, where he touches me with his muzzle to "connect" with me. He has gotten pushy on the ground and I have firmly rebuked him. And like I said, it would be smarter to disalow him any rubbing on me or snuffling me. But as long as he is pretty mellow about it, I admit to lettin him. When he starts to get too strong, I remind him to quit. I know, this is not good horsemanship. I confess!
I'm also guilty tiny! I let Puck make contact, but there cannot be any pressure involved or else he gets a quick correction. Guess he can distinguish between touch and push. I never realized that until you wrote your entry! I knew I had a smart horsey on my hands.
     
    01-02-2012, 09:24 PM
  #9
Trained
I never let my horses or any horses get away with anything, buggers are just to eager to take advantage of it. Yes, I used to, as I get older, I see how they manipulate you.
     
    01-02-2012, 09:25 PM
  #10
Foal
I am guilty also :( question though if I am rubbing behind his ears and he moves his head up and on my hand like o that feels good is that pushy or ok? Lol
     

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disrespectful, head, horse, pushing, training

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