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How Come He Won't MOVE With Leg Pressure!

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  • Animal wont move leg

 
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    01-15-2010, 12:05 AM
  #11
Yearling
First of all, try to rule out any pain or tightness. You may want to talk to an equine vet, chiro, or massage therapist to see if there could be anything physically wrong. If pain can be ruled out, then I would say you just need to keep going at it smoothly as if you are starting from scratch on that side. Having an experienced and calm horseman around while you are working with the horse would also be a very good idea as by the tone of your post you sound a bit frustrated and that usually is not a good sign. Try lunging him in that direction. Riding him on his good side will not effect how he rides on his bad side. Humans can learn something going one direction and apply it to going the other direction. Horses, however, cannot and must be taught fairly going both directions (this is also the reason why horses will sometimes spook at something going one way, get over it, reverse, and spook at it again like it is new-something people cannot relate to and are thus frustrated by). This has to do with them having a very different line of vision as well as a different way of procession information. Also, make sure that you yourself do not have a weird side when you ride. I can't tell you how many times I have seen horses that have a 'bad side' because their rider has a bad side as well.
     
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    01-15-2010, 12:46 PM
  #12
Foal
My first reaction was, is he blind or partially blind in one eye? That's a typical response to a horse not being able to see well ... drifting in the wrong direction, spooking sporadically ... Other than that I also suggest a thorough vet check and some conversations with an equine chiropractor and/or massage therapist. Also, check all of your tack for something that may be bothering him.

Once you've ruled out all of those things, basics are your best friend as stated before ... lunge him until he gives and goes nicely to his "bad" side ...
     
    01-15-2010, 02:15 PM
  #13
Foal
Here's what I think. Horses have a left side and a right side of their brain and they really don't talk to one another.

So you have two horses to train-- righty and lefty--and you have to train each of them like a separate horse--repeating the training on both sides. Sometimes righty learns quick and sometimes lefty does so you have to spend additional time on the side that needs the work--just like Kevin said.

I've run into this lots--mainly with a horse that was "trained" on one side only.

So train him on the side that needs it and work on it until the weak side is as good as the strong one.

True lesson horses are worth their weight in gold. They are a special animal who keeps the kids safe while at the same time teaching them--they don't respond to any cue until its done right. I've had kids work for 10 minutes just to get the horse to walk by giving the right cues. That's my opinion of a lesson horse and this one sure doesn't sound like one to me.
     
    01-15-2010, 02:25 PM
  #14
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5cuetrain    
True lesson horses are worth their weight in gold. They are a special animal who keeps the kids safe while at the same time teaching them--they don't respond to any cue until its done right. I've had kids work for 10 minutes just to get the horse to walk by giving the right cues. That's my opinion of a lesson horse and this one sure doesn't sound like one to me.
Oh so agree!
     
    01-17-2010, 01:00 PM
  #15
Weanling
It sounds to me like the horse is blind, or partially blind on the off side. If the vet clears him as full sighted, I'd have the chiropractor out right away.

I rescued a horse that was severely underweight. He had been trained very well in the past, just needed some hay! When I got his weight back up, I started riding him. He couldn't trot or canter to the right. Heck, he couldn't really even walk well to the right, he was always counter bending. To the left he was great!

I had the chiropractor look at him, and she said it looked like someone took a giant spatula and flipped him over onto his back, withers, & poll. I had him adjusted twice, and even after the first adjustment he was a totally different horse. He picked up the remaining weight much faster, was much less stiff, and he looked HAPPY to do his job! No more pain!

Here is a picture of the report the chiro gave me on him.... what is listed is only 1/2 of what he needed, but she didn't want to change the way he moves too drastically.




He's probably not being naughty, it sounds like pain or blindness, or both.
     
    01-17-2010, 02:48 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by EveningShadows    
I agree to a point. If you stop asking questions, you stop learning. I think the OP could get this horse past it's issue, but not on a deadline like she has, or the purpose really. I think the OP would do better with someone in person, helping her with the horse - eyes on the ground so to speak. For him to be trusted with small children on him when he's not even sure of himself, he needs more than a couple months of riding. I won't knock a novice trained horse if the novice took their time, asked questions, and cared about doing it right for the horse though.

That being said, a teen-trained horse will probably not be as useful as an adult trained horse. I'm sorry, adults have a better grasp on common sense, no offence intended to any younger owners here, but kids don't always think things through and wind up in a bad position or hurt. That's where the "eyes on the ground" come in, IMO.

I agree wth the teenagers thing. However, there is plenty of adult trainers who I would never trust to train a horse. Yes, adults have more common sense, however, that doesn't mean they are some sort of god of horse training. Plenty of young riders can train a horse better than an adult.
     
    01-17-2010, 03:01 PM
  #17
Green Broke
As a teenager I trained my first two horses and I they were the best broke horses. 1 I finished and the other I started and sent it to a trainer for 30 days of finish.When I advanced with a few lessons I was undefeated in the show ring for the many years I showed. English, western and driving so I don't think age matters. When younger I had a lot more time to devote to training and more time to spend with my horses. If you have common sense you just have it. So many adults lack it so I don't think it is learned.
     
    01-17-2010, 03:30 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterjumpervictoryr97    
I'm training a horse for a friend, but he's a bit green. My friend plans to use him in the summer for lessons and this camp she's running, but this horse, Geo, is very spooky and has a few...*problems*. You see, he has a 'good way' and a 'bad way'. When we enter the arena, we go to the right most of the time. I ride him around a bit, do a few circles, get him bending and supple. We walk, trot, canter, and to a few figure-8s and stuff. He responds to leg pressure very well this way, and if I wanted to, I could drop the reins and just control him with my legs and/or voice.

But then I turn him around and it's almost as if he forgets EVERYTHING. He'll walk away from the rail and not respond to leg pressure at ALL. He'll be straight as a stick and not bend, and he'll jump to the side if he hears so much as a door creaking in the wind or snow sliding off the roof (we have an indoor arena). I can walk him and he'll be ok, but I have to keep his reins a LOT tighter than normal. I can trot him around, and after a bit he'll be ok, but it takes a bit of effort. And then I ask Geo for a canter.

Geo's canter when going this way is a WRECK. When I ask him, I turn his head to the rail and kick him (gently!) with my inside leg. He usually takes up the wrong lead, unless we're coming out of or going into a corner. This is very frustrating! Once I get him to get the right lead, his canter is fast and controllable. I lift weights, and he's STILL got so much resistance on the bit that I can't bring him down to a slower canter. He canters sideways, with his head against the rail and his butt sticking into the middle of the arena. His circles are messy, and I don't put any wrong resistance. I turn him in a circle the best I can, but his sideways-ness messes the circles up.

Geo is 8 years old, and has had 4-5 years of off-and-on training. He learns quickly and is like a big puppy dog. He has a really good memory, but when he canters that way (see above for details), it's almost like he's forgotten everything he's ever been taught. His trainers (including me) have all worked together to make sure he's not being trained different ways. He's a bit spooky, and is sometimes more spooky than normal. But I can get him calmed down and un-spooky-ish if I walk him around the arena a few times.

Could someone try and help me by giving me advice on how to handle this? I've been working with him for three or four weeks now, and I've only improved his 'good way' canter by slowing it down and rounding out the circles and closing distance between the rail and him. Please, please, PLEASE help me! I have to have him 'finished' enough for partially-experienced 8-12 year olds to ride him in lessons and camps this summer, so I don't have as much time as I want. Please help!

Thanks,
Hunterjumpervictoryr97
I'm not going to come on here and say you shouldn't be training this horse. No matter who you are, any trainer at one point or another is going to have a question about something. Its happened to me where people think that they can butcher you because you are trying to work with a horse and half the time don't even answer your original question.

Soooo. I think you need to rule out every possible health problem. Make sure he can see fine, bend both ways, and everything else that could possibly be wrong.
Once EVERYTHING health wise is ruled out, you can start fixing the problem. I personally would work in the "bad way" FIRST when you ride Geo. Only for about 5 minutes in the other direction. The more you ride inthat direction the better it will get. Since he sticks his butt out and puts his front end into the wall, I would do this: take your inside leg and move it back and squeeze there. He will move away from it and straighten out his hind end. Pick up your inside rein just enough to bend his nose the slightest bit. I would do alot of circles in his bad direction. Make him bend. Use your outside leg to make him bend that way. DO NOT let him put his head to the outside. If he does or tries to move towards the outside, use your outside leg harder. Maybe even move your outside leg up a bit and squeeze there. I don't really know much about english riding.(idk if your riding english or western) Its all about where you place your legs IMO.
     
    01-17-2010, 03:31 PM
  #19
Weanling
Oops :)

I didn't mean to quote the whole thing! Sorry!
     
    01-17-2010, 03:44 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
As a teenager I trained my first two horses and I they were the best broke horses. 1 I finished and the other I started and sent it to a trainer for 30 days of finish.When I advanced with a few lessons I was undefeated in the show ring for the many years I showed. English, western and driving so I don't think age matters. When younger I had a lot more time to devote to training and more time to spend with my horses. If you have common sense you just have it. So many adults lack it so I don't think it is learned.
Common sense is learned from mistakes. If you have not made many mistakes you don't have much common sense. I also trained some good horses when I was a teenager but I wish I had those same horses back because they would be much better now.
     

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bad way, good way, legs, pressure, training

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