How Come He Won't MOVE With Leg Pressure! - Page 3
 
 

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How Come He Won't MOVE With Leg Pressure!

This is a discussion on How Come He Won't MOVE With Leg Pressure! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Muscled horses
  • Horse won't move off leg

 
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    01-17-2010, 04:49 PM
  #21
Weanling
Ok so I got cought up in everything else you said and forgot about the leg pressure problem. I am suggesting spurs. Not necessarily sharp ones but something to give more meaning to what you want to do. I guess I could put it that way. :) Yes, spurs can hurt a horse and will if used the wrong way. However, all you are using them for is to make what your asking more clear. Don't go jabbing him but squeeze and I believe that he will move off your leg.
     
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    01-17-2010, 05:08 PM
  #22
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasin the dream    
ok so I got cought up in everything else you said and forgot about the leg pressure problem. I am suggesting spurs. Not necessarily sharp ones but something to give more meaning to what you want to do. I guess I could put it that way. :) Yes, spurs can hurt a horse and will if used the wrong way. However, all you are using them for is to make what your asking more clear. Don't go jabbing him but squeeze and I believe that he will move off your leg.
Spurs should not be used to make or teach a horse go forward. They should be used as an aid refinement on a horse that already knows how to go forward.

---

To me, this definitely sounds like a physical affliction that the horse has. Generally, horses should at least have some semblance of balance on each side if they are schooling even one direction well, unless there is a soundness issue.
Before you do anything else with him, as others mentioned, get the whole report on his health and soundness from professionals, or even a well respected trainer.
Perhaps you could show us conformation shots from all angles; seeing the way he is built and muscled may also provide some answers. A video may help too.

Out of curiousity, does he usually carry his tail/head/ribcage to one side? If you free lunge him, does he usually pick his comfortable direction if he has the chance?


If it isn't a soundness issue, then lots of in-hand work is one of my biggest suggestions. Flexions, pressure exercises, stretches, longe-lining and lunging are just some of the ways you can help develop balance, muscle, flexibility, and understanding without the added stress of having a rider on his back. If he responds nicely to these exercises, then try adding a rider while lunging, etcetera.
Time, patience, and understanding: the keys to unlocking potential in horses.
     
    01-17-2010, 05:50 PM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagexlee    
Spurs should not be used to make or teach a horse go forward. They should be used as an aid refinement on a horse that already knows how to go forward.
No I'm not suggesting them for teaching him to move forward. I am suggesting them to make him move off her legs. And yes they can be used to make your horse go forward. They can be used for anything your legs are used for imo. Just, like you said, an aid refinement. IMO, you can use them on a horse that doesn't cleary understand what your asking. Obviously a horse doesn't understand how to move forward the way your asking so what's wrong with making it more clear?
     
    01-17-2010, 05:59 PM
  #24
Weanling
Another question... how is the horse on the lunge line in both directions? If he's completely fine going both ways, bending in towards the circle, moving soundly and fluidly, it is probably something YOU are doing.

Just like most horses have a preference in direction, and just like people are right or left handed, most people have a weaker side to their body (usually the off hand, or non dominant hand). To compensate for this weakness, most people twist or do *something* wrong in one direction. Especially if you don't have regular riding instruction with a trainer that can point those things out.

Just a thought.
     
    01-17-2010, 06:12 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeWHC    
Another question... how is the horse on the lunge line in both directions? If he's completely fine going both ways, bending in towards the circle, moving soundly and fluidly, it is probably something YOU are doing.

Just like most horses have a preference in direction, and just like people are right or left handed, most people have a weaker side to their body (usually the off hand, or non dominant hand). To compensate for this weakness, most people twist or do *something* wrong in one direction. Especially if you don't have regular riding instruction with a trainer that can point those things out.

Just a thought.

I was thinking the same thing after dressagexlee said something about lunging. You should lunge him in the bad direction and see if anything looks weird. Try it with and without the saddle. It could be the fit.
     
    01-18-2010, 11:10 AM
  #26
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
Common sense is learned from mistakes. If you have not made many mistakes you don't have much common sense. I also trained some good horses when I was a teenager but I wish I had those same horses back because they would be much better now.

Maybe some born with common sense learn from watching others make mistakes.
     
    01-18-2010, 02:59 PM
  #27
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagexlee    

Out of curiousity, does he usually carry his tail/head/ribcage to one side? If you free lunge him, does he usually pick his comfortable direction if he has the chance?


If it isn't a soundness issue, then lots of in-hand work is one of my biggest suggestions. Flexions, pressure exercises, stretches, longe-lining and lunging are just some of the ways you can help develop balance, muscle, flexibility, and understanding without the added stress of having a rider on his back. If he responds nicely to these exercises, then try adding a rider while lunging, etcetera.
Time, patience, and understanding: the keys to unlocking potential in horses.
Thank you so much, dressagexlee. I will definitely lunge him (probably today, when I will be seeing him) and assess him and check back with everyone to tell ya'll how it's going.

...

I'd like to thank EVERYONE for their wonderful replies and for helping me so much. I very much appreciate this forum and the wonderful people who use it. If anyone has anymore suggestions - even if they're very unusual; this is an unusual horse! - then please do tell. Again, thank you to everyone, and I hope I can help all of you at some point in the near future.

Thanks again!
Hunterjumpervictoryr97
     
    01-18-2010, 06:49 PM
  #28
Weanling
Yes, please do update us. It'll be interesting to see how this unfolds! ~
     
    01-18-2010, 10:20 PM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagexlee    
Yes, please do update us. It'll be interesting to see how this unfolds! ~

Agreed!
     

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bad way, good way, legs, pressure, training

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