how do I fix this?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

how do I fix this?

This is a discussion on how do I fix this? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-15-2008, 02:12 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    how do I fix this?

    When I get on my horse to ride she has a nice english walk and trot. But her canter is way out of control. All she wants to do is fly around the arena as fast as she can. The added problem of her being unbalanced and clumsy with her feet makes this dangerous. Just today she tripped going around the corner, went down to her knees and almost slammed her head into the wall. Luckily she didn't hurt herself. I'm constantly tugging on the outside rein but she doesn't listen. She'll transition down to a walk or a trot if I ask her to. She just won't slow down her canter. And also, when we're done cantering if I want her to walk or trot again I really have to hold her back because she wants to canter again. I've been thinking about trying a different bit. Right now I use a tom thumb. I want to go to shows with her but if she does this in the ring we'll never place.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-15-2008, 03:05 AM
      #2
    Green Broke
    I don't know much about training, but before you even said it yourself, I was thinking you might want to try a different bit. Unfortunately I do not have any recommendations as I am new to these things, but I do know that I used to ride this mare and she would not respond to anything! Plus she continued to put her tounge over the bit my sis in law was using. She changed it (can't remember what she went to from ), but that girl would stop on a dime after that.

    Good luck!
         
        01-15-2008, 04:02 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Hmmmm. What does she look like when she canters? Does she throw her head up as she goes, or holds it up high? Are her ears right down or perked forward? Are ( if you can tell ) the whites of her eyes showing ?

    What I would do is find out if she is acting this way because of fear of somthing , wether she is trying to avoide something or if its possible excitment. Once you know what it is you can start looking at ways to go about solving the problem, as they all need to be sorted in a different way.
         
        01-15-2008, 04:31 AM
      #4
    Trained
    Re: how do I fix this?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blossom856
    When I get on my horse to ride she has a nice english walk and trot. But her canter is way out of control. All she wants to do is fly around the arena as fast as she can. The added problem of her being unbalanced and clumsy with her feet makes this dangerous. Just today she tripped going around the corner, went down to her knees and almost slammed her head into the wall. Luckily she didn't hurt herself. I'm constantly tugging on the outside rein but she doesn't listen. She'll transition down to a walk or a trot if I ask her to. She just won't slow down her canter. And also, when we're done cantering if I want her to walk or trot again I really have to hold her back because she wants to canter again. I've been thinking about trying a different bit. Right now I use a tom thumb. I want to go to shows with her but if she does this in the ring we'll never place.
    how old is your horse? What breed? I she a ottb by any chance? If not, how long has she been broken? If you could us a little idea of her background that may help.

    In the meantime, the main thing I can suggest at this stage is half halts. Maybe you can also try helping her balance over trots poles etc in the walk and trot. If she is only young this could be contributing to the balance issues. Our wb is 8 but is very green and he often struggles with balance.
         
        01-15-2008, 07:17 AM
      #5
    Yearling
    :) Hey. I will start with the bit, I personally don't like tom thumbs, in fact I hate them. If only I can find some photoes of the damage they cause. I love french link snaffles, alhtough depending on the size of the horse, and the level of expirence the horse has done it really matters... esp if its a ottb. I think a egg butt snaffle or a loose ring should do.

    Now concerning the canta, does he rush it? That usually means he is truely unbalanced and the rider is too. When I got my TB and trianing him for showjumping it took ages to get a wel balanced canta, that looked and felt powerful... I reckonmend lunging, canta poles, and lots of cross rails... do excercises such as, reducing the speed of the canta and fasting it up... getting to control it. You do this by half halts, and a light seat. Also transition work, get your commands snappy, and get a good response.

    Good luck. :P
         
        01-15-2008, 11:37 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    Bitless: On occasion she'll put her her down really low and I have to pull it back up. I'm assuming she does this because of lack of balance. But most of the time she keeps it just above her withers. She keeps her ears forward. I don't know about her eyes. I really think it's excitement because of the way she acts at the walk and trot after I canter her. Or even if she sees other people cantering their horses. She thinks she's going to canter to and I have to hold her back.

    Jazzy Rider: She's about 20 years old and is a draft cross of some kind. She just came to the barn in September from the slaughter house so no one knows where she was before. I didn't hae this problem with her back then because she was fat and lazy. Now that she's lost the weight she has more energy. We do trotting polls just about every time I ride her. Sometimes she'll get lazy and hit her big lunking feet on them.

    Delregans Way: I'm going to speak to my trainer about trying a new bit.
         
        01-15-2008, 03:01 PM
      #7
    Showing
    Did you try half-halts? & sitting back more, like deeper?
         
        01-15-2008, 06:30 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    I have no idea how to do a half halt.
         
        01-15-2008, 07:14 PM
      #9
    Trained
    I often have trouble explaining things well so I got this from classicaldressage.co.uk

    depending on the horse's sensitivity a half-halt can be anything from a raising of the sternum and deepening of the seat, to a firm rein aid when a horse "runs into the rider's hands" (it's actually ignoring the the seat aid and running on into the hand). In the second example you *meet* the horse's mouth with a passive resistance (you don't pull, you just match the force like for like) on the resisting side, at the same time asking with the opposite leg for the horse to engage the hind leg again by stepping more underneath.

    It's not a dead pull, a constant crunch of the abdominals or a prolonged squeeze with the leg. It's a series of combined aid meet-yield-meet-yield until the horse yields by transferring his weight back on to the hindquarters. This is a worst case scenario type of half halt, generally it is a much more scaled down effort that is barely visible to an onlooker.

    Now here comes the technical bit! For a half halt to be effective it has to be timed correctly - it's not just a case of following the above instructions.

    You have to be aware of when each hind leg is coming forward and when it's on the ground. "When it first touches down in front of the vertical, it carries, I.e. The haunches flex. That is the correct moment for the half halt. As soon as the hind leg passes the vertical, however, it starts to thrust. If you were to half halt against the thrusting leg, the horse would brace against you and either go against, above or behind he bit. If you half halt when the leg is in the air, you would shorten the stride and prevent the hind leg from stepping under. It would have to set down prematurely, maybe not even reaching the vertical, much less reaching in front of it. That way, the carrying phase would be shortened or even made impossible. The result would be loss of balance and relaxation not to mention collection." (Dr Thomas Ritter).


    Hope that helps at all :)
         
        01-15-2008, 08:02 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    Considering her age, and assuming that it is not a pain/fear issue, this seems to be some sort of habit that she picked up from her past. Maybe she was never finished properly or she spent a while doing something high energy like gaming.

    I have suggested this to others in similar situations, and will suggest it again. Start her over as if she were a green horse. Put her in a snaffle bit of some sort (loose ring, egg butt, french link, etc.). Teach her to supple up side to side from the ground. In the saddle do a lot of walk/ trot exercises to supple her body and neck. Work on serpentines, circles, figure eights at the trot until she is steady, balance and soft. Work her over ground poles, work on all of her yields, sidepassing, backing, turning on the forehand, haunches.

    Focus a LOT on pressure and release to soften her to the bit. Ask very lightly with everything you ask, increasing pressure and contact slowly, and then release IMMEDIATELY and BIG as soon as she responds the tiniest bit correctly. You HAVE to reward her for trying to do what you ask, and rewawrd her to show her she got it right. If you do not release pressure when she tries, she will be less likely to try again because she will not think she was right.

    When you have all of these little piece soft and smoothe, walk and trot smooth and balanced - then AND ONLY then give the canter a shot again. At that time, if she rushes, make sure to break the canter up with spirals, figure eights (with simple lead change), serpentines (with simple changes), ground poles, transistions, etc. Keep her focused on what you will ask for next rather than racing. Also, during the canter exercises, the half halts are a good idea if needed.

    Half halts for the canter are not a bad idea, but if her foundation truely is not there (which I suspect), it will be useless. It will be a pressure on her mouth that she doesn't understand, that she will fight against. Spend a lot of time back at the basics and working on her bit softness with the new snaffle bit, and then give the canter a try with half halts and patterns.

    Good luck :)
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:46 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0