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How do I train a difficult horse??

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  • Help to train difficult horses

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    06-12-2013, 05:45 PM
  #11
Green Broke
I also agree that horses need positive punishment, not negative punishment. ADD something to decrease the behavior.

I think you need serious help with this horse. The behavior you're describing is very dangerous.
     
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    06-12-2013, 05:48 PM
  #12
Foal
I would have to say that a really good way to help her is go to Pat Parelli. I know with the horse that I help train she is learning the Parelli method and she used to be just like your horse. Now she is the sweetest thing ever. I don't know what you would prefer but this is what has helped me with this problem. And what I can see from what you have been doing with your horse is that yes you haven't taken charge and step up to be the leader. With Nike and her food problem she will try and run you down sometimes. I always go in there with a carrot stick or what ever you use and when she try's to kick you or what ever give her a good flick of the stick each time she does that. I do agree with faye as well about the 3 second part. I hope this helps a little.
     
    06-12-2013, 06:33 PM
  #13
Foal
Thanks guys for yalls help but what some of yall don't understand is that I was 9 when I got her. Of course she was spoiled. I was a little girl! My mom wouldn't let me even get in the pen. My entire life with Sonya was on the other side of the fence. The real trouble was my grandma. She ALWAYS fed her treats. Sonya always got her way because my grandma is an animal lover and knows 0 about horses. My mom, being protective, rarely let me see her. So it was mostly my grandma and the horse. When I got older and was allowed to see her, she had a licking problem, and was completely spoiled. I attempted lunging her because I knew that she needed to be trained. But that's when I got attacked and my mother wouldn't let me step near that horse for the longest time. Then, Sonya was once again spoiled and now that I can work with her, it almost seems impossible. I never spoil her. It's just the lack of being worked with and the mass amount of treats my grandma feeds her.

Thanks!
     
    06-12-2013, 07:13 PM
  #14
Started
Do you have access to a person outside the family who can show you the ropes? Is there any way you could send her to a trainer?

Spoiled horses are incredibly difficult to re-train. They really do need someone who has experience training and dealing with dangerous horses.

You may not think she is dangerous, and I truly believe she doesn't want to be "bad", but believe me, when you start changing the world of a spoiled horse, they will throw quite the tantrums.

You both need a trainer.

You need hands on training on how to work with this horse.

She needs the hand of an experienced person.

This is not the type of horse we can help you with online.
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    06-12-2013, 09:16 PM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer    
Do you have access to a person outside the family who can show you the ropes? Is there any way you could send her to a trainer?

Spoiled horses are incredibly difficult to re-train. They really do need someone who has experience training and dealing with dangerous horses.

You may not think she is dangerous, and I truly believe she doesn't want to be "bad", but believe me, when you start changing the world of a spoiled horse, they will throw quite the tantrums.

You both need a trainer.

You need hands on training on how to work with this horse.

She needs the hand of an experienced person.

This is not the type of horse we can help you with online.
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My family was considering a trainer. But my family doesn't have spare money to go towards it. That's why I was trying to do it myself but I had no idea where to start
     
    06-12-2013, 09:43 PM
  #16
Foal
To be honest, you can't learn the skills you need for this horse over the internet. You've taken the first step by admitting you are a bit stuck with this horse, and that's great. People can sometimes be too proud to admit that they need help, so well done for asking for help.

I know it is really hard when you have an attachment to an animal, but if you can't afford to get a trainer in to help you, then you should consider selling the horse before you get yourself hurt. I'm sure she's not nasty, but horses are big animals, and when they become spoiled, they can become dangerous.

If you are absolutely dead against selling the horse perhaps speak to local barns, see if there is a good trainer that will allow you to work for them on weekends etc and see if they will pay you in lessons instead.

At the end of the day your number one priority is to stay safe. By trying to fix this horse on your own without the necessary skills you are risking your own safety, as well as risking making things worse for the horse as well.
     
    06-12-2013, 10:18 PM
  #17
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by picup436    
To be honest, you can't learn the skills you need for this horse over the internet. You've taken the first step by admitting you are a bit stuck with this horse, and that's great. People can sometimes be too proud to admit that they need help, so well done for asking for help.

I know it is really hard when you have an attachment to an animal, but if you can't afford to get a trainer in to help you, then you should consider selling the horse before you get yourself hurt. I'm sure she's not nasty, but horses are big animals, and when they become spoiled, they can become dangerous.

If you are absolutely dead against selling the horse perhaps speak to local barns, see if there is a good trainer that will allow you to work for them on weekends etc and see if they will pay you in lessons instead.

At the end of the day your number one priority is to stay safe. By trying to fix this horse on your own without the necessary skills you are risking your own safety, as well as risking making things worse for the horse as well.

It's not that we can't afford it, my mother just doesn't want to put her money towards that. And I'm saving up for college so I don't have any money for it. I do have an attachment. Which is a good and bad thing. I get so mad and frustrated with her but sometimes, just seeing her happy to see me makes my heart melt. We grew up together. She was only a newborn. I watched her born and now I feel TERRIBLE knowing that I could've stopped the spoiling. But being young, I had no idea. Neither did my family. I honestly feel horrible and some of these "Helpful" posts are making me feel worse.
Anyways,
I'll talk to my parents about it. I can't just give up on her, but I agree with staying safe. I think I know a lady around that knows alot about horses. I think the reason my parents are hesitant is that we already sent Sonya off for a couple of months to a trainer and she did nothing. She admitted it too.

Thanks so much,
CowgirlPaint
     
    06-12-2013, 11:00 PM
  #18
Started
Maye have your mom come on here. There are a BUNCH of mothers on here who could talk to her from a mom's perspective. The only thing is, it might scare her into not letting you work with her.

Put an ad out. See if there is anyone local who could come out and teach you and your horse on your farm. See if you can work out a daily/weekly rate. When you send one off, part of the money goes to the care and feeding of your horse. You might find a better price if someone is willing to come to you.
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    06-12-2013, 11:49 PM
  #19
Yearling
To start with you need to deal with feed time issues. The horse needs to be fed!
When you go feed take the feed bucket and a whip.
I like the carrot sticks and string. When she comes up she has to be polite. If she comes screaming up whack the stick and string hard on the ground. This before she's even near enough to hit.

Use the stick and string to keep her well off you. Remember to match her energy, if she's really carrying on trying to get at it use lots of energy if she's just stepping forwards just tap the ground. If she gets close enough hit her. Hard. Continue this until you've got the feed in. Then stand by the feed bin keeping her back until she stands quietly.

Walk away and only then she is allowed to eat.

Don't try doing any more until she starts showing some respect. In the mean time I agree look for some help.
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    06-14-2013, 10:57 PM
  #20
Foal
It sounds like you got in WAY over your head. My mom would have *never* bought a newborn horse for me at 9 with the expectation that I'd be training it.

Having never trained a horse before (and how much horse experience do you have otherwise?), you really need to get a trainer. I know they're expensive and can be difficult to find a decent one, but think about it: If you don't, you will probably make little headway on her by yourself, and instead of spending high school on a nice, calm horse, you'll just have this regret and an expensive pasture pet.

In the meantime, you need to stop treating her like an equal and start treating her like you are the herd boss. Someone posted an exercise on here that I really liked: Put her feed in the trough, but stay standing there in front of her, blocking her. If she tries to push you aside, yell and give her a smack. You can use a whip too if you want, which is safer, as you can stop her before she gets close, and keep her at a distance. Let her know that you are the herd boss (who eats first in wild horses) and that she can eat when you're ready to move. Obviously, get someone to stay outside with you, in case she goes bananas, and be ready to move if she decides to rear.

You cannot show fear with horses; they know when someone is afraid of them and will take advantage of it. You sound like you are scared of her, and that is only going to make her keep up her attitude.
     

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