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How do YOU handle it?

This is a discussion on How do YOU handle it? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Installing an overcheck

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    09-23-2012, 10:04 PM
  #11
Weanling
Above all, keep the head up. Sometimes it's hard to remember all the good advice as you're heading skyward. If you keep his head up, he won't be able to get any power into his buck. That may buy you time to start working on the other stuff.
     
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    09-23-2012, 10:10 PM
  #12
Foal
Yes, thank you Ill defiantly keep that in mind.
     
    09-23-2012, 10:18 PM
  #13
Green Broke
I'm going to strongly agree with two points that have previously been made:

One rein stop to disengage his heap, I use to ride a pony that loved to buck, because he knew that he too could dump riders. He would also get me off, until I did some research into the one rein stop.

It won't stop them from bucking most times but it takes most of the power away from the buck. Pulling the horse 'up' with both reins isn't always very effective, it gives the horse something to brace against and can make powerful bucks more easy for them.

Whereas, the one rein stop - you have control of his head, they aren't able to 'break away' from you. Make sure that he gives to the bit each way and when he goes to buck, just pull his head around to the side. I usually push them around into a small circle at the same time. Most of the time, this will get them to think about where their feet are instead of bucking.

Also, don't expect him to completely stop bucking after the first time. Because this has become a vice, it will take a while to train it out of him. Just stick with it and you will see results.

Also, the relax comment - my horse, occasionally likes to buck when he's feeling very fresh. He also likes to throw quite big, powerful bucks. When he does do it, I really try to relax and absorb my own weigh in my legs and my seat. Instead of tensing up, which will cause you to simply bounce right off.
thenrie likes this.
     
    09-23-2012, 10:24 PM
  #14
Showing
Running him around the pen until he's sweating merely appeases your fit of temper yet teaches him nothing. Even a horse with more status in the herd wouldn't run him that hard, a short distance then he'd back off.
     
    09-23-2012, 10:26 PM
  #15
Foal
My horse isnt like that, he will test you (im trying to explain) . I needed the input for control, he doesnt buck when he knows you can handle it and then work the snot out of him. Its how we do it anyway. Once he learns I can stay in the seat and show him im in charge and he can't just buck me off he will learn, Hell he could just be doing it to mess with me. We play all the time, but im tired of getting the breath knocked out of me. So he needs to know I don't want to play like that.
     
    09-23-2012, 10:28 PM
  #16
Trained
I think since you both know he can unseat you, take extra focus to learn his cues. He's giving them, I'm sure. Once you know that first cue of "I'm going to throw you," then change what you're doing. Take that moment to get him turning and disengage his hindquarters, and try again. At this point, you really need to avoid the buck altogether if you can't stick it. In case you can't avoid it, I would shorten your stirrups a hole or two, get in a western saddle [conveniently equipped with an 'oh snap!' handle] and do your best to cling on and get his head UP and his butt turning. Good luck! Bucks aren't any fun and some horses can be real broncs. =P
     
    09-23-2012, 10:29 PM
  #17
Foal
Saddlebag- I've realized that working him in the round pen wont teach him that he has done wrong. But it still helps work him like "Driving him away" like the join up. (Even if you all disagree with that.)
     
    09-23-2012, 10:31 PM
  #18
Foal
Thanks Riccil, haha Like I've read Ill keep his head up and ill look for cues, most of the time he just does like a bunny hop. Nothing to warn me
     
    09-23-2012, 10:33 PM
  #19
Super Moderator
I also do not think your horse is in pain. I think he is smart enough to know that he can buck you off and he does so, only because he can. But, I think it is crazy to keep getting back on him when you know he is only going to buck you off again. Every time you come off, his bad habit is ingrained a little more in him and he becomes more spoiled.

Let me give you a little tip that will keep his head up for you. I have used it for over 40 years now. I have some photos of it if I can find them. I think they are on an old computer that only comes on in 'safe mode' and needs a monitor hooked in to it. If you cannot visualize this, I will try to find them.

I call it a 'cowboy overcheck'. It is actually very close to a driving side-check or over-check and it works like a charm. It goes like this:

1) Leave a halter on under your bridle.

2) Take a 10 or 12 foot piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord (like you can buy at Wal-Mart ).

3) Tie one end of the cord firmly to the right side of bit where the headstall fastens to it.

4) Run the cord up through the top halter ring (or between the two ropes above the top knot on a rope halter -- my preferred way) and place it behind the saddle-horn with a little extra slack in it.

5) Run it back through the top ropes or ring on the other side of the halter and tie it securely to the top of the bit on the left side.

6) Then, get the little bit of slack you left behind the saddle-horn, fold it over itself to make a double half hitch and place that over the horn. I leave one long enough for the horse to carry his neck level but not any longer.

This little piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord has saved my a$$ too many times to remember. Any horse that wants to buck will try to put his head down. 99% of them will hit that little cord, jerk their heads back up and this will let you push them on forward like they need instead of pulling them up to save your hide.

I also use an overcheck like this on kids' horses on trail rides to keep them from dropping their heads to eat. I put them on green colts for their first few rides. I start a colt out with one and as soon as I have loped it out, I take it and loosen it off or take it completely off of the saddle-horn. If I have a real fresh horse, I will put one back on until I am sure the horse is not going to try to buck or play. Once I get a horse going real good and he has never tried to drop his head, I do not use one. It is one of those things for me where an once of prevention is worth 10 pounds of cure.

Then, as already mentioned, teach this horse a 'one rein stop'. Once a horse has been taught (before you need it) to stop and give you his head, you can stop about any bad behavior. It is like installing an 'off button' or 'kill switch'. It really works.
     
    09-23-2012, 10:46 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
I also do not think your horse is in pain. I think he is smart enough to know that he can buck you off and he does so, only because he can. But, I think it is crazy to keep getting back on him when you know he is only going to buck you off again. Every time you come off, his bad habit is ingrained a little more in him and he becomes more spoiled.

Let me give you a little tip that will keep his head up for you. I have used it for over 40 years now. I have some photos of it if I can find them. I think they are on an old computer that only comes on in 'safe mode' and needs a monitor hooked in to it. If you cannot visualize this, I will try to find them.

I call it a 'cowboy overcheck'. It is actually very close to a driving side-check or over-check and it works like a charm. It goes like this:

1) Leave a halter on under your bridle.

2) Take a 10 or 12 foot piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord (like you can buy at Wal-Mart ).

3) Tie one end of the cord firmly to the right side of bit where the headstall fastens to it.

4) Run the cord up through the top halter ring (or between the two ropes above the top knot on a rope halter -- my preferred way) and place it behind the saddle-horn with a little extra slack in it.

5) Run it back through the top ropes or ring on the other side of the halter and tie it securely to the top of the bit on the left side.

6) Then, get the little bit of slack you left behind the saddle-horn, fold it over itself to make a double half hitch and place that over the horn. I leave one long enough for the horse to carry his neck level but not any longer.

This little piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord has saved my a$$ too many times to remember. Any horse that wants to buck will try to put his head down. 99% of them will hit that little cord, jerk their heads back up and this will let you push them on forward like they need instead of pulling them up to save your hide.

I also use an overcheck like this on kids' horses on trail rides to keep them from dropping their heads to eat. I put them on green colts for their first few rides. I start a colt out with one and as soon as I have loped it out, I take it and loosen it off or take it completely off of the saddle-horn. If I have a real fresh horse, I will put one back on until I am sure the horse is not going to try to buck or play. Once I get a horse going real good and he has never tried to drop his head, I do not use one. It is one of those things for me where an once of prevention is worth 10 pounds of cure.

Then, as already mentioned, teach this horse a 'one rein stop'. Once a horse has been taught (before you need it) to stop and give you his head, you can stop about any bad behavior. It is like installing an 'off button' or 'kill switch'. It really works.
This is terrifying advice, it doesn't sound like much of a quick release in case of an emergency. And rope, no less, that won't break.
     

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