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How do YOU handle it?

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  • Will an overcheck rein stop a horse from bucking
  • Home made grass reins

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    09-23-2012, 11:26 PM
  #21
Banned
I agree with Cherie that the more you are thrown off, the more you are reinforcing that the horse can just be done with you.

To prevent yourself from being bucked off you need a stronger seat, you will get this from endless hours of riding without stirrups, mainly at the trot, on a different horse.

Before he bucks, I'd bet money that he slows and lowers his head. There are two cues here - don't let him slow, don't let him lower his head. Kick him forward through it, whack him with a crop if you need to.
     
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    09-23-2012, 11:46 PM
  #22
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
This is terrifying advice, it doesn't sound like much of a quick release in case of an emergency. And rope, no less, that won't break.
It's the same as a Daisy rein or a Grass rein, only homemade…it's not dangerous…and you'll see it a lot on ponies with smaller kids riding.
     
    09-24-2012, 12:12 AM
  #23
Trained
Well, there is one, and only one, time I will use a twisted wire bit...and this would be it - a horse that is very prone to bucking. I generally use a loose rein, so I am "fair" about it...I let them know what is in their mouth before I "have to" use it. It won't stop them all together, but it will limit how far they can get their head down so you can "stay on" and ride it out.
     
    09-24-2012, 12:18 AM
  #24
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
Well, there is one, and only one, time I will use a twisted wire bit...and this would be it - a horse that is very prone to bucking. I generally use a loose rein, so I am "fair" about it...I let them know what is in their mouth before I "have to" use it. It won't stop them all together, but it will limit how far they can get their head down so you can "stay on" and ride it out.
I don't think this is very good advice at all.

A twisted wire bit can be very dangerous, specially in the hands of an unbalanced rider when a horse is bucking. Putting stronger or heavier bits in the horses mouth isn't going to teach it anything, other than bits mean pain.
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    09-24-2012, 12:31 AM
  #25
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChingazMyBoy    
I don't think this is very good advice at all.

A twisted wire bit can be very dangerous, specially in the hands of an unbalanced rider when a horse is bucking. Putting stronger or heavier bits in the horses mouth isn't going to teach it anything, other than bits mean pain.
The question was how would you (universal you) handle it. That is how I would and have handled it with excellent results. The OP did not say she was an unbalanced rider. It is a harsh bit, if that is what you meant - and it has its place. But, I agree...a twisted wire bit does not belong in the hands of an inexperienced rider, or for someone that rides the bit. The very best rider can lose their balance on a bucking horse....the idea is to prevent it from bucking to the degree you lose your balance.
     
    09-24-2012, 02:47 AM
  #26
Green Broke
No amount of bits is going to stop a bucker (I had one that wold buck even with me hauling on the bottom rein of a pelham) and a twisted wire bit will just make him worse because you are introdcing serious pain into the equation and then run the risk of him going from bucking to bolting which is infinately more danerous.

Whilst the idea of Cheries daisy rein is not a bad one to stop the problem, the fact that it is rope and attached to the horn of a saddle (which if you ride english doesnt exist) could cause Major issues and damage. It also doesnt solve the root of the problem and you can bet that as soon as you take it off they will start again. If ou want to try this as a short term measure then you can buy a much safer daisy rein (same principle except will snap if the horse gets hung up on anything)

First thing I would do is rule out any form of pain

Personaly when I had stan, he used to buck for kicks and giggles with very little warning (sometimes no warning) if I felt it coming I alwas hauled his head round to my knee (as in actualy touching my knee) and then spin him untill he was blowing hard (once span him into a ditch). If I didnt feel it coming I trained myself to relax into the first buck and then haul his head round before he could put a 2nd one in!
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    09-24-2012, 03:34 AM
  #27
Green Broke
JazzyGirl - Can you be more specific as to what and when he bucks? Is it when you first get on? When you ask for him to lope/canter? Leaving the barn or going to the far side of the arena? Are you asking him the same thing each time he bucks? Or is it that he is spooking?

Just a warning about pulling his head to the side. Don't pull to the same side each time. Alternate sides if you can or he will anticipate it and avoid it.

The best advice I can give is like others have said to ride it out. Relax and sit deep into the saddle. Depending on what you are actually doing will vary what comes next. If he's refusing to go forward, I would try to push him forward thru the bucks. If he is being forward and you are trying to slow him or keep him going at a slower pace, I would stop him, back him up, do circles and figure 8s.

The one rein stop can help during the buck, but like I said before, don't always do it on the same side. It not only gets his head to the side but it takes the power away from his rear end. I think you had asked about disengaging his hind end? That is when he crosses his leg in front of the other. The only problem is you need to train him and work on it before you need to use it. If he's bucking you off from the get go, it'll be difficult to work with him on this.
     
    09-24-2012, 04:48 AM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
The question was how would you (universal you) handle it. That is how I would and have handled it with excellent results. The OP did not say she was an unbalanced rider. It is a harsh bit, if that is what you meant - and it has its place. But, I agree...a twisted wire bit does not belong in the hands of an inexperienced rider, or for someone that rides the bit. The very best rider can lose their balance on a bucking horse....the idea is to prevent it from bucking to the degree you lose your balance.
By all means, it does have its place. But, the OP has stated that they do not sit bucks well. Which is why I do not see it being the safest option for the horse and rider, I think all other options should be tried first.
     
    09-24-2012, 08:01 AM
  #29
Weanling
@Cherie:

I would love to see a video or photo of what you described. I'd like to try that.
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    09-24-2012, 08:20 AM
  #30
Super Moderator
While someone may think it is 'terrifying advice', I think it is a lot more terrifying to get bucked off on the rocks where I have always lived. It is also far worse to let horses get spoiled and take a chance on them seriously injuring someone.

It is hard telling how many hundred of horses I have ridden with this little overcheck type of thing and have never had it cause a problem. To the contrary, using it has allowed me to ride and retrain literally dozens of horses that were sent to me to because they bucked their owners off at will. It has also prevented all of the colts I started (I used to start more than 50 head a year) from ever bucking with a saddle or bucking on their first few rides. In all of these hundreds of horses, I have run into, maybe 5 or 6, that could buck hard enough with their heads up to buck me or some other good rider off. Two of them ended up in the PRCA on professional bucking strings. They were REALLY GOOD at it.

I have suggested this little gimmick to many people over the years and have gotten a lot of feedback as to how effective it was and how it had allowed the people to actually ride and go on with the training on horses they thought they were going to have to get rid of or put down.

It will work on an English saddle, but it is not as good at keeping a horse's head as high as a saddle-horn will. I just tied a piece of nylon cord between the two breast-plate ring on the front of the saddle and ran the overcheck cord through it. I have used it on horses that would drop their heads after going over a jump. I did get dumped one time when a horse went over a jump and dropped his head so hard he pulled the saddle halfway up his neck. He did not have real high withers, but he sure was not round-backed. It was 35 or 40 years ago and I still remember how I met the ground head-first. But, it evidently impressed him, too, because he did not drop his head and buck after that.

Just like using a nail to let a horse 'teach himself' that biting is not a good idea, this little gimmick is something the horse 'runs into' when he drops his head and he gives himself instant release when he brings his head back up where it belongs. The release is much quicker and better and any rider can give so the horse learns much faster.

The OP can do as she likes, but this is probably her best method to actually get this horse ridden out by her.

Like her original question "How would you handle it?" Well, this is how we handle every incident that we think could even lead to the problem she is having now.
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