How do you identify a good horse trainer if they don't compete?
 
 

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How do you identify a good horse trainer if they don't compete?

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    01-08-2010, 07:22 PM
  #1
Foal
How do you identify a good horse trainer if they don't compete?

Prior to 9 years ago, I had no interest in horses. My daughter was somehow born with the horse bug, no one else in our family prior to her had anything to do with them. So in the last 9 years, I've learned much more about horses than I ever intended to. Due to our location and the type of riding/training that occurs in this area, she has mostly trained with Paint and Quarter Horse centric trainers in Stock Horse type competitions.

During that time, she has trained under six different trainers for periods of time, took one-off lessons from many other trainers and has attended more clinics than I can remember. Also during that time she trained and competed in Halter, English, Western, Ranch Versatility, Team Sorting, Barrel Racing events and then into Reining working her way up to the NRHA level.

Throughout this process I've talked to a lot trainers and have heard so many different things from them. And so many of their methods were in direct conflict with each other. For example, I've taken my daughter to NRHA level trainers who say that she is as good of a rider as any of the Non-Pro competitors that train with them. On the other hand, I've taken my daughter to trainers that don't show/don't like competitions to hear them say she is a terrible rider and needs to start over in the round pen for a year or so.

I've found over time that trainers that actively show seem to have a consistent training program that falls into the discipline and train towards that goal. It makes it easy to compare their horses and riders with their competition to get an idea of how good of a horse trainer they are. Fortunately that's where my daughter's interest lies, so we stick to those trainers.

But as mentioned earlier, there are trainers that don't compete. Say competition is bad, etc. And I always wondered, without the standard that is set through judging/competition, how do you know that they are good horse trainers? What would be the end goal of going to that trainer? How do they know they have become competent riders/trainers?
     
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    01-08-2010, 07:39 PM
  #2
Trained
If you are looking for a trainer to train a competition horse be it a reiner or H/J or dressage then competition is needed. If I am going to send a horse to be trained to be a reiner or any other type of competition horse I am not going to send them to joe blow down the road.

However if all I want is a trail horse then I might consider Joe. However I am a firm beleiver that with horse training you get what you pay for and I have found over the years even if all I wanted was a nice sane sound trail horse trained I would still use a reining trainer. They just put such a good handle on a horse. However if that is not an options and for some it is not then I would look at the horses they have trained talke to everyone I could who have horses trained by that person. I would go and watch them ride and train not just once but several times.

Then and this is where I find most people fall short. GO AND WATCH them ride your horse. Do not just drop it off and expect you will get a trained horse back in 30-60 days. Also be reilalitic about how long it will take to get a good reliable horse back. 30-60 days with most trainers is just not long enough. If something feels off ask. Talk to the trainer find out WHY. This is anouther thing I have found with people and trainers too. They do not talk to each other. I find this is the bigest proplems between trainers and owners.
     
    01-08-2010, 08:01 PM
  #3
Started
I am interested to see what people say in response to this question... I for one don't know how you would be an effective trainer for students who want to be competitive without showing.

I give lessons and I know that I keep myself in training and showing to keep up with what is going on in the showing world ...
     
    01-08-2010, 08:13 PM
  #4
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by nrhareiner    
If you are looking for a trainer to train a competition horse be it a reiner or H/J or dressage then competition is needed. If I am going to send a horse to be trained to be a reiner or any other type of competition horse I am not going to send them to joe blow down the road.
Excellent advise but not all great competitors make great teachers. If you looked at a trainer's students and what they were doing, you would get a good idea of how well their methods work.

As nhrareiner suggested, if a trainer isn't competition oriented then they are not going to point you in the direction you need to go if competition is your goal.
     
    01-08-2010, 08:50 PM
  #5
Weanling
If a trainer doesn't compete then you base their abilities off of their students, and the horses in the program. My trainer hasn't competed in a long time, but her students (I included) continue to do well in the show ring, all the horses under her tutelage are happy and healthy and her riders can ride their horses.

That being said I'd go with a trainer that can continuely produce Riders and Horses that are show ring ready because the show ring is where I want to be. There are too many people who go hang a shingle that have no business doing so IMHO.

There is a really long, big thread about this on COTH if anyone cares to go look.

Beginner/Intermediate Types that declare themselves trainers

Why is success in the show ring suddenly the only measure of a rider/trainer?
     
    01-08-2010, 09:09 PM
  #6
Trained
I think when you get into other events like H/J and Dressage and even WP and such. You can get a way with a trainer who just works with students and dose not show or do a lot of training. I have not found this to be true with reiners. There are no NRHA shows for low level reiners. Most non pros can not train a reiner so you NEED a trainer to train your horse. I have been breeding and showing reiners for about 12+ years now and although I do start mine and I can keep them legged up and honest I know my limits and do not train to a finished horse. I use a trainer for that. In the end you will be so much further ahead b/c even in the rookie ranks those are still some of the best reiners around competing. Even in the youth they are top horses when you are showing in the NRHA.
     
    01-08-2010, 09:14 PM
  #7
Started
I am interested to see what people say in response to this question... I for one don't know how you would be an effective trainer for students who want to be competitive without showing.

Not everyone wants to be competitive. Myself and a group of my horse friends for example.... Enjoy horses but our idea of enjoying horses does not include parading around an indoor arena for endless hours demanding that our horses heads sit a certain way and there legs do a certain thing so that next summer we can sit in the hot sun, parade around a chubby judge and see if maybe we get to take the pretty blue ribbon home.

I give lessons to a few girls who want to learn how to properly ride, train, handle and care for the horse. Girls who also do not want to be competitive but to simply enjoy horses. I do not feel that I'm 'not qualified' to instruct just because I myself do not show & find most showing ridiculous. If they'd like to show, go elsewhere. I have plenty to teach from the ground to out on the trail.
     
    01-08-2010, 09:19 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
I am interested to see what people say in response to this question... I for one don't know how you would be an effective trainer for students who want to be competitive without showing.

Not everyone wants to be competitive. Myself and a group of my horse friends for example.... Enjoy horses but our idea of enjoying horses does not include parading around an indoor arena for endless hours demanding that our horses heads sit a certain way and there legs do a certain thing so that next summer we can sit in the hot sun, parade around a chubby judge and see if maybe we get to take the pretty blue ribbon home.

I give lessons to a few girls who want to learn how to properly ride, train, handle and care for the horse. Girls who also do not want to be competitive but to simply enjoy horses. I do not feel that I'm 'not qualified' to instruct just because I myself do not show & find most showing ridiculous. If they'd like to show, go elsewhere. I have plenty to teach from the ground to out on the trail.
You missed an integral part in that sentence

FOR Students who WANT to be competitive. Not all riders want to compete, but just as many riders do. If I didn't want to show it wouldn't matter to me that my trainer doesn't show either or have a record in the show ring whether it be their own or their students.

And not everyone who competes, works endlessly in an indoor ring. Most top level trainers and riders do cross-train their horses, hack out in an open field and on the trail. Good horsemanship is Good horsemanship.
     
    01-08-2010, 09:22 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
I am interested to see what people say in response to this question... I for one don't know how you would be an effective trainer for students who want to be competitive without showing.

Not everyone wants to be competitive. Myself and a group of my horse friends for example.... Enjoy horses but our idea of enjoying horses does not include parading around an indoor arena for endless hours demanding that our horses heads sit a certain way and there legs do a certain thing so that next summer we can sit in the hot sun, parade around a chubby judge and see if maybe we get to take the pretty blue ribbon home.

I give lessons to a few girls who want to learn how to properly ride, train, handle and care for the horse. Girls who also do not want to be competitive but to simply enjoy horses. I do not feel that I'm 'not qualified' to instruct just because I myself do not show & find most showing ridiculous. If they'd like to show, go elsewhere. I have plenty to teach from the ground to out on the trail.
I think that is all find and good and I agree that there is a place for that type of trainer. However the question is how do you (any you) prove that you can train a horse to do that job if there is no outside un bias opinions given?? To me that is what a horse show is. An out side un bias opinion as to the training of a given horse on that given day and when you put several of those opinions together over time you get a good idea of what that horse can do and what that trainer can do. With out that how do you prove what you can do with out spending a lot of time showing a person?? I think that is what the questions is here.
     
    01-08-2010, 09:24 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Void    

And not everyone who competes, works endlessly in an indoor ring. Most top level trainers and riders do cross-train their horses, hack out in an open field and on the trail. Good horsemanship is Good horsemanship.
I agree with this. My horses when they are up at my trainers do many things. My one mare has been roped off of she has been out on trails. She not only has NRHA earnings but NRCHA earnings with no extra training really. I have shown her locally in many other events and done well. Nice thing about a well trained horse is you can take them and do anything with them.
     

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