How do you show your horse your 'boss'? - Page 3
 
 

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How do you show your horse your 'boss'?

This is a discussion on How do you show your horse your 'boss'? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to show a horse you are the boss
  • You must be boss of your horse

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    02-04-2010, 07:46 AM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
How do you show your horse your 'boss'?
I invite my boss out to the barn and just let the horse see them. Nothing tricky about it, but my boss is not scary in any way so I guess there is not reason to do anything fancy.

     
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    02-04-2010, 09:28 AM
  #22
Weanling
I agree with TwoGeldings

It may seem mean, but its worked for me too.
My boy was gelded only a couple years ago (hes about 13 now) and once in a great while he gets back into stallion mode and thinks he's the boss and gets hard to control. When that happens, I work him really really hard and I yell at him when he trys to fight me and that keeps him calm and safe enough for my mother to ride, who had a horrible fall off a horse and got a spine and head injury. Might seem mean, but it works
     
    02-04-2010, 09:33 AM
  #23
Trained
I agree with posts where people state you do not dominate your horse, you work together with your horse to establish a bond, trust and a relationship.

We are not here to dominate these animals, we are here to work with and together.

Marecare, Spyder, Kevin, ridergirl and others.

Great advice has been given - and please, stop thinking "must dominate and show my horse who is boss" because that'll get you no where.
     
    02-04-2010, 10:15 AM
  #24
Started
^^ Yep!!
     
    02-04-2010, 10:35 AM
  #25
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
I invite my boss out to the barn and just let the horse see them. Nothing tricky about it, but my boss is not scary in any way so I guess there is not reason to do anything fancy.

ROFL, epic win.

Agreed with what most other people have said. Don't fight your horse, work with your horse. He hits an area and wants to back up? Great! You make him back up until YOU tell him to stop. If he thinks backing up is so fantastic, he's going to think twice when it becomes your idea and not his. He's figuring out you don't much like it when he backs up on you. You can smack him around and turn tight circles, but I really do prefer the compromise method - you want to do something, fine, let's do it until you're sick of it to! Whatever area he decides he feels like going to, alright then bud, we're going to work here instead then!

I find keeping calm and quiet usually gets you a whole lot further then hootin' and slappin'. Don't allow yourself to alert your horse to the fact you're annoyed. This tells him he's "winning" the leadership race. A lot of people are of the school that you can never let a horse do certain things or he thinks they're right. A lot of people don't realize that compromising is the best system for letting your horse realize even when he does it HIS way, he always seems to end up doing it YOUR way as well. Instead of fighting him tooth and nail to keep him away from the gate, simply work him AT the gate. Take the path of least resistance, and horses very quickly figure out that their attempts to be sneaky are in vain because they're still not getting out of work.
     
    02-04-2010, 10:57 AM
  #26
Foal
Thank you everyone that really helped

Next ride, which should be today, hopefully will go A LOT better than yesterday. I'm going to lunge him for longer and ride him along the trail back and forth. I was told by a person that does good with horses that Jack needs saddle work. So I'm probably going to make Jack walk the trail back and forth today. Maybe lunge him for 10 minutes before I ride.

Again thank you everyone
     
    02-04-2010, 11:05 AM
  #27
Green Broke
May I ask, is there a reason why you lunge?

I personally dislike lunging. I think it's a waste of time unless it's being used to exercise a horse you cannot ride. Lunging is boring to horses, and hard work. I find horses become quite crabby when they're asking to work in circles for 10-15 minutes and then they have to get ridden as well?!

I spend time doing groundwork with my youngsters in the beginning. The first few rides I put on Jynxy, I round penned her because I wanted her alert to her cues and my voice before getting on and letting her sort out any bucks she may have for the saddle. This isn't quite the same as lunging because I'm making her stop and pivot and change gaits and change pace, and keeping her on her toes to get her attention on me.

Now, I do not round pen her. I do not want any horse I own feeling like they need to "work the kinks" out before I mount up. They have plenty of time to do that in the pasture, and now I want to ride you so you can behave for the next 60 minutes. Jynx has limited amounts of energy to begin with, and now that I've stopped round penning her before rides, I find her MUCH easier to ride. She's not exerting all her energy running in pointless circles, and even as a coming 3 year old filly, I do not have any issues with her acting silly when I mount up.

So just a suggestion. Unless there is a very specific reason on why he needs to be lunged, I'd scrap it. You've already managed to make him bored and annoyed by the time you're done lunging, and that's not a good place for him to be now that you want to ride.
     
    02-04-2010, 11:22 AM
  #28
Foal
I feel its a way for him to listen to me and know he has to listen to me. I don't know what else to do to make him listen to me.
     
    02-04-2010, 11:38 AM
  #29
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
I personally dislike lunging. I think it's a waste of time unless it's being used to exercise a horse you cannot ride. Lunging is boring to horses, and hard work. I find horses become quite crabby when they're asking to work in circles for 10-15 minutes and then they have to get ridden as well?!

The first few rides I put on Jynxy, I round penned her because I wanted her alert to her cues and my voice before getting on and letting her sort out any bucks she may have for the saddle. This isn't quite the same as lunging because I'm making her stop and pivot and change gaits and change pace, and keeping her on her toes to get her attention on me.
If lunging is done correctly - it is an excellent way to warm the horse up, determine soundness and attentiveness.

My horses can stop, pivot, change gaits and change pace on the lunge line. What they cannot do - as opposed to a round pen - is run off wildly and change direction anytime they so choose.

Round penning is basically free lunging. The only thing a horse cannot do on a line vs free is to roll back to the rail.
     
    02-04-2010, 11:53 AM
  #30
Green Broke
If you are properly round penning, it should be no different the a lunge line. A horse has just as much of an ability to bolt, spin and act silly on a line as he does in a pen if the handler is not being attentive and clear with his/her signals.

I was not saying round penning was better then lunging. I was using it as an example - if she's able to do the same things on a line, then good. My point was that whether you're lunging or round penning, if you're doing it strictly for the purpose of burning energy by running them in circles, then you're setting the horse up to be annoyed before you ever get on.


     

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