how to get a horse to arch his neck? - The Horse Forum

 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:32 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Australia, Queensland
Posts: 1,320
• Horses: 1
how to get a horse to arch his neck?

How do you get a horse to arch his neck/head? I've been wondering whats the best way to teach this? I've never done dressage before, maybe once or twice but not actual high up there dressage but I'd like to teach my horse since I will probably be doing it next year.

Horseriding- The art of keeping a horse between you and the ground.
Tayz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:43 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,175
• Horses: 3
Visit the dressage subforum, english riding and horse training and look for anything to do with collection and 'head set'. These posts tend to attract the usual answers - get the hind quarters working and the 'pretty arched neck' will follow. It's not a matter of pulling their head around a little until they suck back and arch their neck, If it was that easy I wouldn't bother being a dressage rider ;)

~Horse & Hound Artistry~.

Website: www.horseandhoundartistry.com
Kayty is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:43 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 133
• Horses: 1
Well there are 2 types of an arch. The "On the bit arch" or the bit resisting avoidance arch. Go for the first one. When your horse is on the bit they are traveling from more their butt and not their front legs. More push from behind. Also it mauves their back supple and rounded and they are usually smoother. I cannot really tell yo how to train it but look around online a ittle bit. Heres another website that explains it pretty good.
Getting a Horse 'On the Bit'

Hardest Thing About Riding Is the Ground!
Jumpehunter is offline  
post #4 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:44 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany- but not German =D
Posts: 5,151
• Horses: 2
I may be misunderstanding here, but you're talking about getting a horse on the bit, right? For dressage, and especially higher dressage, the highest point is the poll.

If you have never had a horse rounded on the bit in a relaxed outline, I would suggest lessons on a horse that is capable so you become aware of the feel.

To teach a horse, you need to forget bringing the horse up and round first of all, its all about low work, keeping the contact, but helping the horse build up the correct muscles from working through his hind legs and back correctly. Once this has been establised (we're talking weeks, not days here ;D) you can slowly ask the horse to gradually come 'up' over short amounts of time, but the horse will tire quickly at first, nod or head shake. You really have to find that balance, and feel like you're riding the whole horse, not part of it.

You may want to ask this thread to be moved to the dressage thread. Someone there like Kayty, anebel or Spyder will give you more info about half halts and correct timings and feel, or look for other threads similair to yours.
BCtazzie likes this.
DuffyDuck is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:47 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany- but not German =D
Posts: 5,151
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
Visit the dressage subforum, english riding and horse training and look for anything to do with collection and 'head set'. These posts tend to attract the usual answers - get the hind quarters working and the 'pretty arched neck' will follow. It's not a matter of pulling their head around a little until they suck back and arch their neck, If it was that easy I wouldn't bother being a dressage rider ;)

YOU BEAT ME.

Ah, you should have seen Duffy last night :) I WAS RIDING A WHOLE HORSE, NOT JUST A FRONT END! And the contact. At first it had to be a bit firmer, but then she worked in to an active contact and she worked beautifully... apart from tanking off in a canter!!
However, one of the girls did exactly as you've mentioned above.
They pull a horses head in to a stiff, unnatural bend using contraptions like draw reins and ride the front end to look flashy, leaving them hind legs dragging behind. Backs are stiff, no engagement, and the rider's arms look like popeye.
DuffyDuck is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:52 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 482
• Horses: 0
The line of the neck is not a matter of teaching him to arch it, it is about collecting a fully developed topline. The arch of the neck comes when your horse has the strength to contract the muscles all along his topline, pull his hip under himself and lift his shoulder, the neck and head coming up are merely an effect of this action.
MysterySparrow is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 07:57 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,175
• Horses: 3
Oh but DD - its much easier to just pull on the front end, after all, it's not about feel, its about sight, you can see the head and neck, so focus on that :)



*joking*



Ok Tayz, here's a good thread to get you started: As you will see, dressage is far, FAR more complicated than pulling on a horse's head to make it arch it's neck. Its an extremely complicated discipline, demands a huge amount of patience, feel, timing and knowledge from the rider to be even mildly successful.
If you are really keen to get started in dressage, there is nothing that will help you more than an experienced coach. Depending where in QLD you are located, there are multitudes of very good coaches and riders available to teach you. QLD and NSW is abundant in good coaches!

The mysterious half halt, causes and effects.

~Horse & Hound Artistry~.

Website: www.horseandhoundartistry.com
Kayty is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 08:01 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany- but not German =D
Posts: 5,151
• Horses: 2
Haha Kayty, I know, and so long as her front legs look flashy and I can run over the top of any other competitors, I'm fine, right??!!

Good luck Tayz! Once you get the bug, you'll never go back =^^=
Kayty likes this.
DuffyDuck is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 12-08-2011, 12:34 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: MD
Posts: 23,907
• Horses: 2
My only advice would be to take lessons with dressage trainer. You won't advance much by just reading if you don't know the basics (and noone on ground is watching you do it correctly). Although I second the idea to check the Dressage and English Riding subforums (also you can search on "head set", "horse in frame" and so on - we had some threads on it in past). Good luck!

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass: it's about learning to dance in the rain..."

"When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves."

"How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours."
kitten_Val is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 12-09-2011, 07:43 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Australia, Queensland
Posts: 1,320
• Horses: 1
Ok thankyou guys, I am going to be getting a new instructor at start of next year whos apparently very good at dressage so fingers crossed he can help us understand :) Also I waas wondering whats the best way to teach your horse bare back??
My horse has never had a person on him without a saddle so I'm wondering, whats the best way to do it? Should you just get on and hope for the best?? :S I would really appreciate help on this because I don't know where to start.

Horseriding- The art of keeping a horse between you and the ground.
Tayz is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Randoms of Mur and Arch wordstoasong Horse Pictures 1 10-21-2010 11:25 PM
My horse won't bend at the neck Citrus Horse Training 8 08-27-2010 01:20 PM
Hunter Jumpers: Arch in the Lower Back? Cupcake English Riding 28 07-09-2010 10:28 AM
Lowered head/neck and ears pinned to neck coffeemama Horse Training 12 11-07-2009 01:16 AM
Horse with Stiff Neck blondladync Horse Health 1 08-09-2008 07:01 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome