How important are vocal cues to YOU? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 26 Old 09-25-2012, 11:51 PM
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I use a lot of vocal cues, especially with greenies, when transferring groundwork to when I'm riding them and then I slowly wean them off of it, since you can't speak during a dressage test. ;) I find tone to be very important, more so than the actual words. I didn't use to verbalize very much when training, but I have learned the power that they hold. It's pretty cool.

"He doth nothing but talk of his horses."
~William Shakespeare
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post #12 of 26 Old 09-25-2012, 11:52 PM
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I haven't used vocal cues too often. I talk to my horses all the time, but I don't ask them to do anything verbally unless it's yelling at Sam Pants to get out of the feed room. I'm going to have to start doing it more though since the new horse is missing an eye.
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post #13 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 12:03 AM
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The only time voice cues ever were helpful for me was when I had my old pony and I would let really young kids ride her. She knew whoa, walk on, and t-rot as well as up for picking up her feet. She'd hold her hooves up on command for a little one so they could clean them. For working around children it was nice she had verbal cues. Rest of the horses it hasn't ever really played a role in handling or riding them.
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post #14 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 08:23 AM
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STAND: to stand still, usually grooming or mounting or vet checks
COMEHERE: come here,
EASY: slow down watch your feet, usually a trail obstacle or coming up on another rider,
Whoaaa: stop
BACK: back up,
PICK IT UP , PICK IT UP: move up into a gait from a slow walk
YAH MULE: canter.
I SAID WHOOO G(@ D@^^ IT: I really wanna stop
MOVE YOU A HOLE: your on my foot.
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post #15 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 08:33 AM
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I found it came in very handy when teaching Brock to move off my leg without spurs. I'd give him a nudge and if he ignored it I'd give him a kick and "terrrrot!" or "walking!". Didn't need to do it after the first few times. Brock has:

- walking
- terrrrot
- CAN-ter (if any of these are a downward transition, it's "and ----"
- whoa (I say it like "woe" as in "woe is me", and firmly, not soothingly - a command)
- back
- over (for grooming and when I needed him to move over so I throw in his feed)
- up (to get him to put his head back up if he dips down to eat grass)
- look there (so he looks straight ahead rather than at the camera lol)
- Git out! ("don't try that one again!")

I find them really useful, mostly in dealing with him on the ground. He's not super responsive to a jab or a hard whack, but he responds immediately to my voice. Also handy in getting him to stand properly for photos, he looks gawky enough without swinging his head round to the camera all the time...
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post #16 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 08:54 AM
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Trot: self-explanatory
Walk: self-explanatory
Canter: self-explanatory
Wait: pay attention to what I'm doing
Over: swing your butt over or step away from me
Ho (said softly and slowly): Please ease gently into a balanced downward transition
HO (shouted): Slam on the brakes NOW
Oy: Stop doing whatever you're doing
Knock it off: same as above, only I'm more annoyed.
Stand: glue yourself to that one spot on the ground and don't move.
Good girl: Yay, you did that right.
Give that a push: push a gate with your nose or chest.
Clicky noises: more engagement from behind, please.
Back: Back up.
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post #17 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 09:05 AM
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I expect my horses to respond to all aids, individually or in combo. That's what makes a good, kid/beginner friendly, broke horse. Mine all stop with seat alone but they also know what whoa means and if I say it, it means now. I work with a lot of children and having those vocal "magic words" can save them in a pinch.

Good example, lesson a few nights ago it came into play. Student is young (8) and was on a younger mare of his grandmother's, great mare but younger. I've put a few tune up rides on the mare and establishing a strong verbal whoa response was one of the first things I asked of the mare. Anyway, they were riding along and the proverbial horse eating plastic bag came into the picture and the mare spooked, had I not yelled whoa across the arena it would have been a bolt & book situation instead of stopping and getting over it. That verbal whoa saved a kid from eating dirt. For beginner riders especially, I think those cues are super important. It takes time to develop a cool confidence in a sticky situation and sometimes what one knows goes out the window under pressure. Having that "magic word" can make a big difference.

Another example, a situation of my own when younger. Coming home from the 3rd barrel, standing in my stirrups and one broke. I was hanging off my mare's side ala superman to get past the timer. My mom was on the other side of the fence and yelled "Jana (my horse) WHOA!" and she stopped, had she not respected that word there was a good chance I'd have eaten the exit gate head first because seat and reins were out of the picture for use at that point.

Aside from whoa, I expect them to trot with a cluck, lope with a smooch. Again, for kiddo benefit. My daughter prefers to ride my 16.3hh Hanoverian mare, there is no way Missy will feel 45 lb Morgan's short little legs. She will however respond to a cluck or smooch or a Teeeeerot & CANter! Do I use verbals with her, not often at all but my legs and seat she feels and understands clearly. A light child rider likely doesn't have the timing, coordination nor the weight & length for quiet aids alone to do the trick.

Forgot to add, I also growl..at my horses and dog. Low and quick grrr gets attention quickly and they all know if I do that they need to straighten up. They also hear "GIT" a lot, especially in pasture when hanging out at a gate especially when I need to get through with equipment. They respect my GIT more than me honking the truck horn at them lol!
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Last edited by MHFoundation Quarters; 09-26-2012 at 09:11 AM. Reason: afterthought
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post #18 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters View Post
I expect my horses to respond to all aids, individually or in combo. That's what makes a good, kid/beginner friendly, broke horse. Mine all stop with seat alone but they also know what whoa means and if I say it, it means now. I work with a lot of children and having those vocal "magic words" can save them in a pinch.

Good example, lesson a few nights ago it came into play. Student is young (8) and was on a younger mare of his grandmother's, great mare but younger. I've put a few tune up rides on the mare and establishing a strong verbal whoa response was one of the first things I asked of the mare. Anyway, they were riding along and the proverbial horse eating plastic bag came into the picture and the mare spooked, had I not yelled whoa across the arena it would have been a bolt & book situation instead of stopping and getting over it. That verbal whoa saved a kid from eating dirt. For beginner riders especially, I think those cues are super important. It takes time to develop a cool confidence in a sticky situation and sometimes what one knows goes out the window under pressure. Having that "magic word" can make a big difference.

Another example, a situation of my own when younger. Coming home from the 3rd barrel, standing in my stirrups and one broke. I was hanging off my mare's side ala superman to get past the timer. My mom was on the other side of the fence and yelled "Jana (my horse) WHOA!" and she stopped, had she not respected that word there was a good chance I'd have eaten the exit gate head first because seat and reins were out of the picture for use at that point.

Aside from whoa, I expect them to trot with a cluck, lope with a smooch. Again, for kiddo benefit. My daughter prefers to ride my 16.3hh Hanoverian mare, there is no way Missy will feel 45 lb Morgan's short little legs. She will however respond to a cluck or smooch or a Teeeeerot & CANter! Do I use verbals with her, not often at all but my legs and seat she feels and understands clearly. A light child rider likely doesn't have the timing, coordination nor the weight & length for quiet aids alone to do the trick.

Forgot to add, I also growl..at my horses and dog. Low and quick grrr gets attention quickly and they all know if I do that they need to straighten up. They also hear "GIT" a lot, especially in pasture when hanging out at a gate especially when I need to get through with equipment. They respect my GIT more than me honking the truck horn at them lol!
The safety thing is very true - and even for adult riders in trouble voice cues are very helpful! I fell off a school horse once during a big spook and got caught in the stirrup - all I could think to do was say "whoa", luckily he knew voice cues and immediately stopped spooking and stood still so I could release my foot. Would have ended up being dragged and probably with a sprained ankle and scraped raw otherwise.
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post #19 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 09:31 AM
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gypsy knows lots of verbal cues, but honestly i have her work off body language. she is very sensitive [the vest assistant would say too sensitive as she had trouble lunging her LOL] to body language and movement. i also dont use verbal cues when riding her [and i only cluck to her like once every other month LOL] because we do dressage and you cant talk during a dressage test !

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
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post #20 of 26 Old 09-26-2012, 11:45 AM
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I use a ton of verbal cues, but I do use it in conjunction with leg, seat, body, and rein cues.

Although just as an example from my ride last night, I was asking Red to gallop a full mile as part of his normal conditioning routine. He was a little lazier last night, which is out of the ordinary for him, but I very specifically use a kissing sound when I want him to gallop (along with my leg/seat cues for the lead I want). Well as we're galloping on, I can feel him wanting to slow down and possibly break into a trot. All I have to do is give him a barely audible KISS sound to keep him moving along. I could also squeeze my legs gently to keep him moving, but its nice that he's listening that intently to me that he knows what I want.

Whoa - obviously for whoa
back .... back .... back - for backing up
over ... over ... over - for sidepassing
cluck sound - to trot
kiss sound - to gallop
hup - to make a sharp turn, like in gaming
ready? ready? ready? (excited voice) - to breeze him in the open field
hey (stern) - when he's not paying attention to what I want
Good boy - obviously ... praise!
Load up - to self-load himself onto the trailer

And that's all I can think of right now!

∞*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
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