How To Lunge A Horse Without A Round Pen? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 12:30 PM
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Tap his shoulder, not his butt. When you tap his butt it means you are asking him to stop.

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post #12 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 12:32 PM
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Although pointing the whip at the shoulder can keep the horse out on the circle, the whip is to point at the croup (or where the leg would be) or swing into the hind legs. NO whip use should ever result in a horse stopping.
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post #13 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 12:34 PM
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No, I never use anything to stop my horses. I just walk towards their hind. If they don't slow down then I point and tap the air with my stick. If they still don't listen then I will slightly tap them - but I rarely have to use it at all. I tap their shoulder to go, that's it.

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post #14 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 12:47 PM
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Walking toward a horse('s butt) will turn them toward you which is hte problem the OP has at this point (if I understand it correctly) ad wjat NH do in a round pen. (and cutting them off by being in front will turn them away).

Ideally lunge and round pen are to support riding behaviors (not ones in isolation). Ideally touches of whip (behiind leg or on hindquarters) teach GO. Why do it backward to what you will need later (ie touch the horse on the quarter and it equals stop?)? Work in hand is usually whip raised=go, whip lowered= slow or stop (will be useful for horses for piaffe in the long run as well if one is headed in that directions).
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post #15 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 12:48 PM
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I don't do it that way, haha! Maybe that's why we don't agree! Lol. Yes, but then by the sound of your way - it does sound right.

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post #16 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 01:02 PM
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It sounds as if your horse has just been following the rails of the round pen rather than actually listening to you and has become robotised. You removed his guideline and he's confused.
I would be inclined to start off with a short lunge line - folded up in your hand - and use your arm to create the angle with a whip to extend that length and 'tell' the horse that its not Ok to come in to say 'Hi'
I think he may be seeing the tap on his butt more as a signal to move it over rather than move himself forwards so being able to keep that pressure behind his butt to drive him forwards rather than on the side of it might help
Keep your body language active but not threatening as you don't want him taking off across the field
Begin with whatever command you use to say whoa and stand and then ask him to walk on verbally - I say 'walk on' and also use a clucking noise. Once he understand this then gradually give more length on the lunge line to increase the distance between you and him while regularly asking for the 'whoa' and 'stand'.
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post #17 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amberly View Post
Tap his shoulder, not his butt. When you tap his butt it means you are asking him to stop.

I think what you mean by this is that a tap of the whip/leadline on his hip would mean "step your hiney over , disengage and stop".
Do I read that correctly?


I haven't read the whole thread, so forgive me if I repeat what others have said. Trying to lunge a horse and having the horse turn and face the handler is a VERY common problem. The handler then tries to circle aorund to get access to the horse's side in order to drive them forward, and the horse keeps moving the hind end away , facing the human and soon the horse is "lunging" the human.

In lunging, you want to stay somewhat anchored in the middle. When I lunge, I do walk a small circle, almost pivotting on my inside foot, while facing the horse. My outside foot's toe will be pointed at the horse's shoulder.

So, your problem is to get the hrose to give you it's driveline (the area where you leg would normally aply a little pressure to say "forward"). If the hrose persists in facing you, you have to get it to move its' face/shoulder out away from you, out onto the circle, right?

So, start by putting pressure on the inside edge of his face (like, aim for his inside cheek/nostril). Applying pressure means kind of "tapping" the air with your hand, or if the hrose is dull, swingingthe lead line or even vibrating the whip in the air-pointed right at that spot.

You want the horse to move away from you with his front legs. You want him to step sideways with his outside front leg, onto the track of your imaginary circle. When he does, you will be able to shift the focus of your driving pressure furthe back toward his driveline.

Also important is that you keep a forward leading pull on the line with your leading hand. You want the horse to be thinking in the direction you want him to move. So, put some feel on the rope and even a few tugs. Watch his eyes and ears to see if he is looking in the area you want him to go. When he does, support that with a soft drive on his drive line. So, he's thinking forward, and you get his feet to follow his thought.
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post #18 of 21 Old 03-20-2013, 06:59 PM
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There are lots of different cues you can use while lunging, but make sure you're not asking the horse to come in to you (whatever your cue for that may be). If your horse is particularly sensitive to body language, that could be the problem. For example, I take a step back to ask my horses to come in, and they will want to come in as soon as I start to shift my weight back.

Otherwise, I would add more pressure until the horse goes. I have a colt that really likes to come in (which is nice because he joins up easily). I had to be fairly firm with him at first to keep him working, but now he gets it.
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post #19 of 21 Old 03-21-2013, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I think what you mean by this is that a tap of the whip/leadline on his hip would mean "step your hiney over , disengage and stop".
Do I read that correctly?
Yes, and sorry, I should have said "disengage." When I make any movements towards my horses hind end, except the regular walking, then I am asking them to Disengage and to stop and face me, but don't walk forward until I ask.

Brisco has that problem, ever time I stop him, he walks forward. He is getting so much better though. Now I only need to give him a little wave of the hand and he stops completely.

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post #20 of 21 Old 03-23-2013, 03:28 PM
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Practice

Practice in a semi enclosed area and then slowly, day by day move out more so he's not enclosed anymore, like in a pasture etc. My Gelding was doing this, because he was never lunged before, I just walked to his side, and started lunging again until he knew he wasn't getting anywhere with this behavior..
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