How to make the horse willing and why do people react as if the horse just hate them?
 
 

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How to make the horse willing and why do people react as if the horse just hate them?

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  • How to make a willing horse
  • Why do horses turn me on

 
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    08-25-2009, 06:30 PM
  #1
Zab
Yearling
How to make the horse willing and why do people react as if the horse just hate them?

I read a lot in forums and I often find myself thinking " Why do they immediatly come to the conclusion that the horse just wants to be difficult?"

Well, I can nderstand how frustrating it can be to have ruled out pain and fear and still not get the problem solved. And yeah, I've used force to get my will through, but still it oesn't eel quite right.

Horses have a very willing and cooperative attitude by nature. Sure, they're lazy too but not to an extreme point. So why do we always think they just like being difficult?

Also, horses generally likes to walk and run and use their bodies, even if it can be hard when they're unfit, they like excercise like people like TV ;)

So why won't the horse want to go further on that trail (=barn sour)? Why doesn't it like the dressage we try to ride? Because I am sure that some horses refuse just because they don't want to. My question is..why do they dislike it so much? And more important.. how can we make them ctually like it?

All this that they try to take over and you need to be the boss.. sure. You want to be the boss or else it's dangerous. But the horse don't mind being lead by a good boss, and I don't think a good leader is one that beats the horse as soon as it shows any sign of irritation or being bored. I think a good leader respects that and tries to make it fun or at least show compassion and make the less fun parts as few and interesting as possible, perhaps switching them to something else that gives the wanted result in the end.

Why does the horse refuse, if it'ds not in pain or scared? Is it bored? Is it uncertain if you're trustworthy and know what you're doing? Does it think that it's just not worth it?
And how can we change that?

Because I really, truly, deep inside me believe that all horses want to cooperate with their rider, if they just trust his or her ability and leadership, and if the rider makes things as interesting as possible. Motivate.

And I kbnow very well that a lot of you still believe that you have to overpower the horse with pure force so it knows you're the boss. While I think it's impossible to overpower a horse at all, unless perhaps if you tie it up and break it down by severly cruel methods.

So.. anyone with ideas on how to treat specific problems without force? How to make that barn sour trail horse enjoy the trail and wanting to leave the barn for it, or get that dressage pony to do the leg yields willingly even tho he really prefer the walk-trot transitions? Etc.
     
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    08-25-2009, 06:32 PM
  #2
Green Broke
It is much easier to blame the horse or write it off as being a difficult, dumb, whatever label you give it horse than to stop and take a long hard HONEST look at themselves and what they might be doing to create the reaction they are getting from the horse.
     
    08-25-2009, 06:50 PM
  #3
Foal
I've been told (and do believe) that a horse is very much a mirror of their owner. If my horse is giving me trouble then the only one to blame is myself. I find it's much easier to correct myself before I correct him. Once I re-adjust whatever my shortcoming was, he falls right into place. I just got done having a discussion with my 9 year old, I told her there is no such thing as a "bad" horse, only bad owners.
     
    08-25-2009, 07:06 PM
  #4
Trained
Well, some horses do want to be difficult. It's not always an excuse. Horses are just as different from one another as people are to other people. Some are more easy going, some are more stubborn, and some like to cause problems.

That doesn't mean I don't take a step back and make sure I'm doing right by horse, that I'm doing things in the correct manner.

When I first got my filly, she didn't want to leave the barn and Ricci. But she had to leave. We pracited leading around the pasture, and she led great. But when I tried to take her away, she stopped. She doesn't want to go, and to make it fun, I have to make her go and once she's going, it gets fun. You can't just explain that on the other side of the door is your horse's most favorite treat or activity, you have to show them. So with Gracie, I took her in a circle and started walking again. When she went forward, she got praise, when she stopped, she got an "Ahh!" and a circle. And she learned that walking through the trails wasn't so terrible. It enticed her curiousity, and she got loved on a LOT.

My mare Ricci loves the trails. She doesn't have a barn sour cell in her body, she WANTS to be out there. But sometimes, she doesn't realize how much fun she has. We'll be out on the trails going along great, and she'll decide she's done. Well, no, we aren't done. So yes, she gets "forced" forwards, and then she remembers that, oh yeah, I DO like doing this! She'll go forever, she wants to cut new trails and gallop down any stretch we can. I don't need to make it fun, she knows it's fun.

If you have a child, and you want him to take piano lessons, or play hockey. You have to make him try it, because without trying it, they don't know if it's fun or not. And once they try it, you work out the results.
     
    08-25-2009, 07:12 PM
  #5
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
When I first got my filly, she didn't want to leave the barn and Ricci. But she had to leave. We pracited leading around the pasture, and she led great. But when I tried to take her away, she stopped. She doesn't want to go, and to make it fun, I have to make her go and once she's going, it gets fun. You can't just explain that on the other side of the door is your horse's most favorite treat or activity, you have to show them. So with Gracie, I took her in a circle and started walking again. When she went forward, she got praise, when she stopped, she got an "Ahh!" and a circle. And she learned that walking through the trails wasn't so terrible. It enticed her curiousity, and she got loved on a LOT.
But that's still ''making it fun''. A lot of people would have used the ''it's better to go than to stay'' and forced her forward with a whip or backing (y'know practically runing backwards with an angry human in your face-backing) or other forceful means.
     
    08-25-2009, 07:20 PM
  #6
Trained
It is better to go than stay. I may not be as forceful as some other people, but I'm not afraid to be forceful. She's going to be big, and she already tries to throw her weight around. She needs to know that doing what I want is better for everyone, and I'll do what it takes to make that point clear. I'm rough with my girls when I need to be, and they still love me to pieces.
     
    08-25-2009, 07:35 PM
  #7
Foal
I dunno. You've given me a lot of stuff to think about. I have a rather fiesty 2 year old, and while I try to keep it fun for him, at the end of the day, keeping it safe is far more important since his idea of "fun" normally involves pain on my end. That doesn't mean forcing or hurting him, but it does mean carrying a crop with me on the ground to help remind him where my personal bubble is (don't have to hit him with it, noise works just fine), because he's a teenager and teenagers, whether human or horse, get their first tastes of adulthood and like to test those around them to see where the boundaries are.

I do agree with everything you've said, though. I teach 7-12 grade and with my student's it's all about the motivation. I can force them to do problems, ala a quiz, but they won't do them well and they sure as heck won't learn anything. They need to have a reason or desire to spend their time. Horses have a lot in common with teenagers, for some reason. Or maybe it's just my perspective on both? I dunno. Anyway, I'm interested to see what other people think about this. :)
     
    08-25-2009, 07:41 PM
  #8
Zab
Yearling
When it comes to personal space, kicking, biting and other things that's just downright respectless and dangerous, I don't hesitate to use force to fend for myself :) But I work to avoid all such confrontations. Example; instead of backing or pulling on a horse that tries to walk/run past me when I lead it, I just take turn and he's behind me again. If he tries to run into me or so I will hit him.

Thinking is good ;)
     
    08-25-2009, 08:09 PM
  #9
Showing
It goes back to the old saying, if your horse won't do what you ask, then you are asking wrong.
I think people have a tendency to attach human emotions to animals. They don't have the same emotional capabilities that we have.
     
    08-25-2009, 08:29 PM
  #10
Yearling
I feel that solving problems without conflict is is very hard for some people and it was very hard for me at one time in my life.

It is much easier now and I feel that the horses respond to the approach much better and I enjoy the training more.

Horses can have troubles too, and sometimes those troubles are the people handling them.
     

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