How to make your horse yield to you?
 
 

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How to make your horse yield to you?

This is a discussion on How to make your horse yield to you? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Clintan anderson yeild to the stop
  • Yeild to a stop with a horse

 
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    05-06-2012, 10:46 AM
  #1
Foal
How to make your horse yield to you?

Howdy Everybody!

Now that I have a license I have more access to me horse and can work with her a little bit more than I have been. She lives 40mins away from me so I see her on week vacations and on some weekends. I would like to learn how to make her learn to yield her front end and hindquarters to me. I don't really know how to make her learn to do that though. Any tips or tricks?

Thanks,
CowgirlK
     
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    05-06-2012, 11:22 PM
  #2
Foal
Can anybody possibly help me? Anything would be fantastic!
     
    05-07-2012, 12:38 AM
  #3
Trained
Try Clinton Anderson techniques- if you look him up, he walks you through it. In my personal experience, getting the horse to yield the hinds is much easier than the fores.
     
    05-07-2012, 01:23 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Well, it's not something she really has to learn. She probably already knows this. If she were in a pasture and another more dominanat horse wanted the food she had, it would snake it's head out and threaten to bite her. She'd yield her front away from that horse.

You will be working onthe same principle . If you want her to move away from you (yield), then you have to apply as much pressure as it take to make her want to move away from that pressure. If you want her to yield her shoulders, it would be her nostril that you woiuld focus your pressure toward. You can start by gently pushing with one hand on her jaw and the other on her shoulder. If pushing just causes her to push back, then kind of "pulse" with the pressure. If she moves away, stop pushing.

You just work at this kind of pushing and stopping when she moves. After a bit, you shouldn't need to actually push on her, but only push on the air near her and she will move over.

The same concept is used for the hind, though I would put both hands near her hip. You can apply a sharper pressure by pusing with your finger tips with your hand shaped like claws kind of.
     
    05-07-2012, 01:45 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Tiny I think she meant like instead of yielding away from you having her yield towards you. I second clinton for this :)
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    05-07-2012, 01:52 AM
  #6
Foal
Thank you very much! These are some great tips! :) it's more groundwork I can work with accomplish a stronger bond with my mare!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-07-2012, 01:58 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
Tiny I think she meant like instead of yielding away from you having her yield towards you. I second clinton for this :)
Posted via Mobile Device

You mean yield the hind quarters away? There is no such thing that I know of having a horse "yield" toward you. Yield means to give way to someone else.

Do you mean "draw" toward you? That's a different thing, in my book.
     

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