How to move a youngster forward
 
 

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How to move a youngster forward

This is a discussion on How to move a youngster forward within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-19-2008, 09:54 PM
      #1
    Foal
    How to move a youngster forward

    I have recently broken my colt in. He is so quiet that he doesn't want to move into a trot or canter willingly. I find myself constantly niggling him with my heels, which annoys him. I then tried using longer stock reins and flicking him lightly under the belly or on the rump to move him forward. Once I got what I asked for I stopped the pressure. But to me he will end up sour with this constant annoying flicking of the reins. Does anyone have any idea's to help with this?
         
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        05-19-2008, 10:58 PM
      #2
    Showing
    Artificial aids, such as spurs, are a good idea, but don't use them all the time or he will become dead to your heels. Instead, ask him to go forward with your calves, then quickly bup him with your spur if he doesn't respond to the pressure of just your leg.
         
        05-20-2008, 12:10 AM
      #3
    Foal
    Thanks heaps for that. I shall give a try.
         
        05-20-2008, 12:34 AM
      #4
    Showing
    Oops! That word was supposed to be "bump" not "bup" hehe :)
    I have always used the "ask, tell, demand" method - you ask nicely (squeeze your calves on his sides), if there is no response, you tell (kick with your calves, no spur), and if he still doesn't respond, DEMAND it of him (bump with the spur, if still no response, get aggressive with it - not so hard it hurts him badly, but you want him light on your aids)
    Another thing to keep in mind, when he does something good, praise him ("good boy" or a stroke - REMEMBER that horses can feel a fly on them, so don't do a firm slap on the neck, rather stroke it gently.... I see way too many people "patting" their horses for praise)
         
        05-20-2008, 04:35 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    If he doesn't move then you kick harder until he does!! If you start using other directions then he will never learn the cue from your legs. One thing I learned when training colts or any youngster is to never ***** foot around with them, be firm, and once he starts listening then you can back off with the severity. He'll soon learn to move when you ask nicely
         
        05-20-2008, 09:12 AM
      #6
    Foal
    Ok guys. I appreciate the responce. I'm only new to this so any feed back helps. I've been to scared to push him hard in case he blows up. But he seems to be too quiet, (if that is possible) so I definitely need to be firmer. I am very firm with him on the ground coz being a 21/2 year old colt, he gets pushy and is starting to nip, so I have to be firmer on his back to hey. I'll let you know how I go if your interested.
         
        05-20-2008, 12:07 PM
      #7
    Showing
    Don't worry about him being quiet - some horses just are. There are some factors that could play into that; is he still growing and skinny? What kind of feed is he on?
    Anyways, if he isn't blowing up, that's a good thing; some horses accept a rider no problem.... but don't let him get out of work by putting his foot down, you have to be bossy... "ask, tell, demand".
         
        05-21-2008, 05:53 PM
      #8
    Showing
    Move him forward with your lower leg and keep your hand soft. I wouldn't go to spurs just yet. If he is green broke he needs re-enforcement with your lower leg not so much spurs. The use of a dressage whip will do a much better job as long as it is used only as needed. Make sure you really reward him when he does move forward with your hand.
         
        05-22-2008, 12:22 AM
      #9
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by My2Geldings
    Move him forward with your lower leg and keep your hand soft. I wouldn't go to spurs just yet. If he is green broke he needs re-enforcement with your lower leg not so much spurs. The use of a dressage whip will do a much better job as long as it is used only as needed. Make sure you really reward him when he does move forward with your hand.
    Yes I strongly agree!
         
        05-22-2008, 06:05 AM
      #10
    Showing
    These type of topics are always so difficult because every horse is different and every poster has had different experiences and trainers.


         

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