How to move a youngster forward - Page 2
 
 

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How to move a youngster forward

This is a discussion on How to move a youngster forward within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-22-2008, 06:00 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Good Point
         
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        05-23-2008, 08:42 AM
      #12
    Foal
    In responce to JustdressageIt, I am only feeding him 50/50 (MolloMix) and Pollard. Yes he is very tall and slim. I wouldn't call him skinny as he is just so long and lanky. Just as I get a nice covering on him and he looks super, he has a growing spurt. He is about 15.2 now and he is only 2 1/2, so he has years of growing and filling out yet. I didn't want to fill him up with high powered food and bulk him up to quick as I didn't want him getting to big for his young legs. Do you have any other feed that you'd recommend that wont fire him up but will help with conditioning. He has an amazing shine on him, so I know he is super healthy.
         
        05-23-2008, 11:25 AM
      #13
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jewlz
    In responce to JustdressageIt, I am only feeding him 50/50 (MolloMix) and Pollard. Yes he is very tall and slim. I wouldn't call him skinny as he is just so long and lanky. Just as I get a nice covering on him and he looks super, he has a growing spurt. He is about 15.2 now and he is only 2 1/2, so he has years of growing and filling out yet. I didn't want to fill him up with high powered food and bulk him up to quick as I didn't want him getting to big for his young legs. Do you have any other feed that you'd recommend that wont fire him up but will help with conditioning. He has an amazing shine on him, so I know he is super healthy.
    The only reason I asked is that some owners purposefully keep their horses very thin so they don't have the energy to get spunky. (And please don't think that I'm accusing you of this, but the lazy thing reminded me of it - read on: )
    Perhaps your horse really does have some spunk, but since he just went through a growing spurt, he needs the energy to just focus on growing. Have you ever lived or been with teenage boys? I have a younger brother and he sleeps 90% of the time, and spends the other 10% eating! He's very lazy, but it's because his body is using so much energy to grow... horses are the same. I wouldn't worry about him being lazy at this point.
    In reagards to the spur thing - remember my "ask, tell, demand" post - the spur is only in the "demand" aspect of it, to get him light off your leg; if you just keep kicking and kicking it could very well make him dead to your leg - and believe me, you don't want that ;)
    Best of luck! Please give us updates!
         
        05-23-2008, 06:03 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Does your horse lunge?

    If he's rusty on his lunging, I would maybe try going back to that first.
    He should be walking, trotting, and loping on command (I use "walk" for walk, one click of the tongue for trot, and two clicks for lope). Also, when I say whoa, my horses know that they should be stopping right quick.

    Just don't get too over clicky if he doesn't repsond right away. Click once, if he doesn't go click again after a few seconds. Then step forward and force him to move forward with your body language until he learns that your cues need to be taking right seriously.

    If he does lunge well and is responsive to your cues, then I'd do just as JustDressageIt has suggested, as that's my basic principles for starting younger horses.

    It could be because he's a confident enough horse, he just doesn't want to listen to you and he knows that if he ignores you long enough, you'll get tired of asking him and give up and he wins.

    Or, he just really doesn't know what you want of him, where the lunging will really help clear up that grey area.

    If you try the lunging and that still doesn't work (or he knows and it's not working), try just asking him to move his hips over.
    Put your leg behing his girth and bump him until he shifts to whatever direction your asking him to go.
    But remember that as soon as he moves even an inch, remove the pressure and let him stand for a minute to think about what happened.

    Once he moves his hips around a few steps in each direction, he may get the idea that leg pressure means move, and he will eventually learn direction.
         
        05-24-2008, 02:48 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Thanks so much for the feed back. I get what you mean about him growing and putting his energy into that coz when a sunny day comes, boy oh boy is he a rat bag. I have him seperated from my daughters pony now coz he picks on him. Yes he lunges but he really pulls on my arm. I don't have a round yard so I can't free lunge him. He pulls me over when he wants to muck around, but with a growl, he pulls his head in. He is very touchy on his right side for some reason coz when I rode him today, I lightly put my leg on him as I asked him to turn, and he jumped out forward and looked around at my legs. I spoke to him gently to reassure him and off he went. He also goes around nicely to the left, but to the right he goes around nicely then decides to stop and look at me. I cracked it a bit today and he went balistic, but then he listened and moved off. I think I just have a naughty, stubborn colt that listens most of the time, but I need to be on top of him all the time..........thanks again guys...........
         
        05-24-2008, 09:56 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    We have a gelding on our yard who is just the same!! So backward thinking that he doesnt have a clue what forwards means! I ride him and am the only one to get trot and canter out of him!

    Youngsters like this need you to be as loud on there backs as possible. Get a short stick and just get after him, growl at him and as soon as he goes "oh my god what are you doing, im going already!" be still and quiet and let him go forward with quiet praise. He will learn that your are only load and scary when he is idle and not doing as he is told and that you are quiet and leave him alone when he does what he's supposed to!

    It is very funny and the first couple of times I had to be a proper pony club style jockey, flapping and kicking but now he is perfect and a squeeze is all he needs!

    Also if he is idle in the school/menage/field, then take him on rides out and about, hacks too, they are great for getting a baby too think ahead and be more forward in their way of going! It really does work!
    Unfortunately both of mine are the opposite and I am forever trying to slow down! Hehe which is much less fun!

    Best of luck!
         
        05-25-2008, 02:31 AM
      #17
    Foal
    moving forward

    A good way to get them to move forward is to line drive them with long lines. You put a surcingle on them and run driving reins through the rings up to his bit. When you walk behind (not directly behind) him and tap his rump with the reins and give him a verbal cue to go. Like a kiss or a cluck. You control where he goes by steering him and learns to keeping moving forward because you are back there. Good luck
         
        05-25-2008, 04:26 AM
      #18
    Foal
    I shall keep you all posted. Thanks heaps....... :)
         

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