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How to slow a trot?

This is a discussion on How to slow a trot? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Teach a horse slow trot
  • Trot speeding horse contact

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    03-15-2013, 08:31 PM
  #11
Trained
She's on the forehand, thus losing balance and speeding up to maintain it is my bet.
Smrobs is dead in, literally millions of transitions, along with teaching her leg yield on a circle.
Learn to engage your core, the feeling you should imagine when you're trying to slow a horse down is that of 'pushing a baby out' sounds a bit kooky but it certainly works.

Do not lean back or see saw the reins. Leaning back is a driving aid, it is counter productive.
See sawing the reins will only teach the horse to back off the bit and fear your hands, making attaining a correct contact later in training darn near impossible.
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    03-16-2013, 08:43 AM
  #12
May
Foal
If she is ignoring your request of slowing down; I'd make her work for making that decision. You asked her to slow down; and then she should. Demand that she slow down. But don't stress her - that will make her lose focus and go faster.

I would start by asking her to collect up when she goes faster than I asked or don't slow down when I asked. Maybe tip her nose to one side, and let this work be your consequence for not slowing. Then when you feel her going just a little slower, I'd reward by letting her completely loose. When she picks up speed; repeat. Maybe put her on a tight circle, collected, then when she slows, let her loose, make the circle bigger. After a while they figure out that it is easier to just go slow. I might haul her all the way around, and let her loose, and repeat when she goes too fast too - but no snatching or jerking around, that will just stress her. The point I'd want to make to her would be; "Okay, if you want to go fast you will have to work for it." Not possible to force them to go slow, and though body posture and correct aids are very important; it is also the matter that the horse is telling you "no, I'd rather do it my way". Going too slow, going too fast, not stopping, not going forward is usually the same problem - lack of respect for the rider's authority.
     
    03-16-2013, 08:55 AM
  #13
Trained
May, your solution would work for a horse that is genuinely bolstering through the rider's aids.
But to me, I believe in this case the horse is not balanced, and as such it HAS to go faster to stay in balance. By hauling it's face around on tiny circles, all that will be achieved is putting the horse even more off balance, and making him nervous. You will probably end up with a horse that bucks as well as runs on.
     
    03-16-2013, 09:32 AM
  #14
May
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
May, your solution would work for a horse that is genuinely bolstering through the rider's aids.
But to me, I believe in this case the horse is not balanced, and as such it HAS to go faster to stay in balance. By hauling it's face around on tiny circles, all that will be achieved is putting the horse even more off balance, and making him nervous. You will probably end up with a horse that bucks as well as runs on.
I'm just curious; why do you assume this horse is off balance and not just bolstering through aids? Often when they don't pay attention to work, or does not want to work, they become heavy or off balance. My thinking is that if you can reach the horse mentally first, it will be easier to make it work correctly. But you are absolutely right; hauling him around would not help balance - that is a mental thing and not a physical. I'd like to hear why believe this is more a physical problem?
     
    03-16-2013, 05:38 PM
  #15
Trained
Because from other posts the OP has made, it is likely the horse would not being ridden 'up' to the bridle at this point. Also to mention that I have seen very few horses running through the bridle and speeding the trot up, that are actually in balance, on their haunches and over their back. Maybe they were being ridde in this manner and something goes wrong for a moment, but a rider should be able to regain hasty control if that were the case.
My own horse is competing elementary with scores in the 60s, training medium including half steps and working pirouettes, and I still have issues with him barging through my hand when the work gets a bit harder. EVERY time it is becausehe dives onto his front legs, loses balance so takes off. It's a mild correction now due to his training level, a couple of half halts to snap him back again, and ride him up in shoulder fore through some of the work to improve flexibility and weight carriage on the haunches. If I were to start pulling him around in little circles and 'get after him' I can guarantee the proverbial 'manure' would hit the fan. We need to tell a horsewhat to do, not what NOTto do.

It is both a mental AND physical issue, a horse on the fore hand feels that it's rider is not 'leading' and thus needs to balance itself.
Through riding thousands if transitions, teaching leg yield and starting to shift the focus from 'don't run' to a more positive area of 'do this instead', the OP's horse will begin to shift more weight onto the haunches and gain confidence in being able to remain in balance without running.
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    03-18-2013, 10:28 PM
  #16
Foal
What does a leg yield consist of? I'm familiar with the term, but not necessarily the steps associated with producing a correct yield.
     
    03-19-2013, 07:12 AM
  #17
Trained
Leg yield is a precursor to lateral work - it involves the horse moving forward and sideways at the same time. What differentiates it from lateral movements, is that it does not have bend (only slight flexion away from direction of travel), where as lateral movements always have bend.

It teaches the horse to establish a connection between the riders inside leg and outside rein, and stretches, supples and strengthens the inside hind leg.
I use leg yield and shoulder in more than any other exercise except transitions. They can both help you to regain control, concentration of the horse, balance, collection, etc.
There should not be a ridden horse on the planet that should not be able to perform a basic leg yield, it is easy to teach and just so valuable no matter what your discipline.
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    03-19-2013, 11:18 AM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Leg yield is a precursor to lateral work - it involves the horse moving forward and sideways at the same time. What differentiates it from lateral movements, is that it does not have bend (only slight flexion away from direction of travel), where as lateral movements always have bend.

It teaches the horse to establish a connection between the riders inside leg and outside rein, and stretches, supples and strengthens the inside hind leg.
I use leg yield and shoulder in more than any other exercise except transitions. They can both help you to regain control, concentration of the horse, balance, collection, etc.
There should not be a ridden horse on the planet that should not be able to perform a basic leg yield, it is easy to teach and just so valuable no matter what your discipline.
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Thank you! That makes sense. Now what about shoulder in?
     
    03-19-2013, 11:44 AM
  #19
Weanling
Do not see-saw, your horse with just have a harsher mouth and will end up pulling and going faster, this is a in-correct technique, not to mention if your to harsh you can really hurt your horses mouth. If you just keep pulling, your NOT going to win and your going to make the issue worse.

Like posted above, your horse is on the forehand. Transitions, half-halts, posting slower, trot poles, keep your horse thinking like doing leg yields, serpentines, change of directions, sprial circles (start large and push your horse in to smaller circle gradually, then push your horse back out; this will help your horse to rock back on the haunches). You've got a lot of great advice here, good luck!
     

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