How we teach a 'One Rein Stop' - Page 3
 
 

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How we teach a 'One Rein Stop'

This is a discussion on How we teach a 'One Rein Stop' within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to teach a horse to one rein stop
  • One rein stop

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    03-27-2011, 10:37 PM
  #21
Trained
Great post Cherie. The only tweak I would add is to stress that no leg pressure is present while pulling back the one rein. Like you've already pointed out, the goal is not hind end disengagement.

Also, for whoever commented on pulling a horse's head all the way to your leg, that's only for the teaching stage. Usually within 20 minutes of teaching it, the horse learns that if they just stop sooner, they won't have to do nearly as much bending. My horse stops if he just feels me pick on the one rein. Most learn this technique very quickly.
     
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    03-27-2011, 10:54 PM
  #22
Trained
Tried it two days ago when my mare spun up in the arena. We've practiced it ad nauseum, and she does fine when relaxed, but she had no interest in one rein stopping when scared. If anything, it seemed to make her more worried/agitated, not less. She could yield her head while moving in another direction. After 2 hours, I turned her tight with rein and heel to disengage, then jumped off her while she was still moving. Of course, nothing else I tried Friday worked either...

To the extent that a ORS is a cue to a learned behavior, it is possible for fear to override it. IMHO.
     
    03-27-2011, 11:37 PM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    

To the extent that a ORS is a cue to a learned behavior, it is possible for fear to override it. IMHO.
Totally agree, but it still works at least for my horse whether he's scared or not. If it didn't, my horse would probably be dead since I once had to use over 20 times alongside a busy road when he was scared senseless by a Llama. It ended in an emergency dismount and me leading him to saftey, but the one rein stop did prevent the bolt that he really wanted to execute, over and over again.
     
    03-27-2011, 11:44 PM
  #24
Super Moderator
If I reschool a really spoiled or neurotic horse, I work on it for at least a week, riding 1 to 2 hours each day. I will work on other things too, but my main focus will be on getting a horse to check, stop, give me his head and relax. The week spent here will save me countless weeks of fighting or pulling on a resistant and arguing horse.

I have not had one that did not learn to 'check' the instant I slid my hand down a rein and stop on his hind end, give me his face when I asked for it.

On the other hand, I have not had one learn it well in 1 or 2 days ---- even one that is not over-reactive and resistant.
     
    03-28-2011, 12:34 AM
  #25
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Totally agree, but it still works at least for my horse whether he's scared or not. If it didn't, my horse would probably be dead since I once had to use over 20 times...but the one rein stop did prevent the bolt that he really wanted to execute, over and over again.
In a sense, I agree. I lost count of how many one rein stops Mia & I did, all in a row. She would stop...for 1-2 seconds, then off again. But she was getting more panicked with time, not less so, which is why I eventually bailed. But that came after doing a one rein slowdown (she wasn't stopping for anything at that point), followed by a disengage and 'now is as good as it is going to get so dismount'. FWIW, my wife said she had never seen me move that fast before...I told her fear was a wonderful motivator!
     
    03-28-2011, 12:37 AM
  #26
Trained
In all fairness to the training aid, it is just called a one rein stop. It's not a one rein everything is right with the world stop! I sure wish it had been when we saw that Llama!!
     
    03-28-2011, 12:41 AM
  #27
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
In all fairness to the training aid, it is just called a one rein stop. It's not a one rein everything is right with the world stop! I sure wish it had been when we saw that Llama!!
I want it all! To include a carpeted dismount block, and an auto-tranquilizer for my horse!
     
    03-28-2011, 12:49 AM
  #28
Foal
All of these posts are fantastic. Okay, so I'm going back to the tack shop for a new bit. What exactly do I ask for? AFTER I read Cherie's directions I will start to practice in our pasture. Now, since he will be in a different bit, is there ANYTHING else I should watch for or expect as far as behavior from him because I have no idea why he is in a curb in the first place. Please excuse my UN-educated-ness. He does really good in the bit he is in, but I understand a curb bit is more harsh. Since he is so good, can or will he be just as good in a less harsh bit?
     
    03-28-2011, 09:41 AM
  #29
Super Moderator
When you teach a horse to give you its head, one of the important steps is to keep its head at your knee until it relaxes and NOT let it go forward until you tighten your legs and ask it to go forward. It should never go forward until you tell it to. I am afraid your horse (BSMS) had many more issues than just a one rein stop could fix. It needed to be retrained from scratch because the training holes were far too great to fix without fixing the entire training program. They were way beyond a 'quick fix'.
     
    03-28-2011, 11:16 AM
  #30
Trained
The one rein stop is promoted as a way of stopping a frightened horse. If it is merely a cue to a trained behavior, it doesn't do that. The cue is no more powerful when pulling on one rein than when pulling on two.

Circling a horse in tightening circle will slow it down. Add a disengage at the end, and even if the horse won't stop, it will be moving slow enough and with its hindquarters preoccupied to allow an emergency dismount.

I think it is silly to say that if you teach a horse to stop when one rein is pulled that you have taught a way to slow or stop a bolting horse, or to prevent a bolt. First, bolting horses do it rather suddenly. And secondly, a bolting horse isn't listening to cues - that is what defines a bolt.

The better trained a cue is, the better the chance that it will rise above the background noise of the horse's fear. OTOH, the greater the fear, the better the chance that the horse's fear will overwhelm any trained response.

And Cherie, the smiling face is usually a pretty good sign someone is joking. I'm not looking for a quick fix, and I honestly didn't expect a one rein stop to provide me with a carpeted dismount block.

However, since Mia's problems all began after I reintroduced the bit to her 2 months ago, I'm inclined to go back to riding her bitless. I rode her that way for 2+ years without her spinning out of control, and the other day proved a bit won't help control a horse that isn't responding to cues. And yes, my other horse rides with a bit 100% of the time without any problem, so it isn't my hands.
     

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