This is how we train a fearless trail horse! - Page 11
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

This is how we train a fearless trail horse!

This is a discussion on This is how we train a fearless trail horse! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to make your horse obedient cherie
  • Train horse not to jump water gullies

Like Tree446Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-24-2012, 12:34 PM
  #101
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
Yup!!

Same is true on the ranch. If I am running across rough pastures, crossing steep gullies and crossing the water in the bottom of them so that I can 'head' a bunch of cattle trying to get to the brush or trees, I am not going to pet and cajole my horse to go where I want him to. He is going to go because that is where I pointed his nose and asked for 'forward'.
If you think about it, whether ridden english or western, a working horse is a working horse. It doesn't matter if it's a ranch horse or a fox hunter. Their job is to go where the rider says go, when the rider says go, and as fast as the rider wants. If something needs to be run over, jumped over, or ridden through, that's what it does.
bellmcc likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-24-2012, 02:35 PM
  #102
Started
One of Cherie's posts describes step-by-step how she trains the "obedience & trust" into a horse, & that I find to be just "taking the time it takes" gradual development of the horse's trust by inching closer over time to the object (she said it can take 2 hours of going back & forth), so this is same as approach of the "relationship" folks. Cherie also said that she'll listen to her horse if it refuses to proceed on trail, giving snake experience as an example, so this is also same as approach of the "relationship" folks.

The bottom line is trust in the leader, & it's really not a matter of training trust into a horse; trust is earned, by showing consistently that one is trustworthy.

How does the alpha get that unquestioning, instant obedience? By being the best leader/making the best decisions.

Humans do well to remember that horses are aware of dangers that we aren't, "out there"; thus we are handicapped in our judgement & must listen to our horses.
Marecare and bellmcc like this.
     
    02-05-2012, 09:19 AM
  #103
Yearling
Seventeen years ago when I found my then 8 year old QH mare, she is now 24 years old, I promised her verbally that I'd never ask her to doing anything to cause her harm. There had been a few times I nearly pushed that promise to it's limit. When we first became each others our first outings were on our country roads where we live. She tested me twice by spooking at nothing more than large rocks on the roadside. I just ignored the spooking and rode on as if nothing happened. After the second spook she never did it again at anything. That is the gospel truth. However, she never lost her spirit and was always ready for our next adventure with ears perked forward. When she felt good she would literally "ask" me to let her have a short lope by giving a small buck that never unseated me. I didn't want to lose that essence of her personality so I did let her go at a lope for a short distance. She always came back to me with no problem when I took her back to a walk.

Building a bond and trust with our horse is the most rewarding experience ever. Before I ever rode her we spent a lot of time on ground work and back to Basics 101.
     
    02-07-2012, 08:08 PM
  #104
Weanling
Great post. One of the worst times I ever got bucked off was when a feed sack blew under the legs of a green horse I was riding. Now I desensitize my horses with a sack tied to bailing twine. It might not desensitize the horse to everything but if the horse does spook he will probably not spook as bad. Everybody does things a little different and it doesn't mean that what someone else does is wrong. What ever works. People are often too rigid in their ways and they lose out. For the most part if you have control of your horse's nose you have control of his mind. Ok. So which is it 35 or 49 years?
     
    02-07-2012, 08:31 PM
  #105
Foal
Amazing post, it definitely reaffirmed that you need to be confident, for your horse to be confident. Something that I tend to forget with a particular horse I ride.

Not to hijack but my particular problem with him is gates... I've been trying to work on opening/closing metal swing gates while on him and he is just so spooky and prancy when it comes to the gate coming anywhere near him that I can barely even get him squared up beside it. (Even when I'm on the ground opening and closing gates and he's beside me) So, this may be a different type of situation, but I was wondering if Cherie's advice holds that I shouldn't let him really think about it as much, maybe it's my own fears about his spookiness? I don't know ... Any advice to get him over this particular fear?
     
    02-08-2012, 11:00 AM
  #106
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliduc    
Great post. One of the worst times I ever got bucked off was when a feed sack blew under the legs of a green horse I was riding. Now I desensitize my horses with a sack tied to bailing twine. It might not desensitize the horse to everything but if the horse does spook he will probably not spook as bad. Everybody does things a little different and it doesn't mean that what someone else does is wrong. What ever works. People are often too rigid in their ways and they lose out. For the most part if you have control of your horse's nose you have control of his mind. Ok. So which is it 35 or 49 years?
@eliduc: Doing the math my QH Mare is 25 this year in March. My birth year is the other part of my username. Needless to say, I am an old-timer.
     
    02-08-2012, 11:52 AM
  #107
Foal
This reminds me of the old cavalry horses. Imagine you are on horseback in a war, and you must get an important message to the general. You are going to ride your horse in a bold, determined way and not deal with anything as ridiculous as shying at flapping flags, or even gunfire for that matter. I think that when you have that sort of strong, confident focus, the horse knows it and trusts you. Has anyone ever been in an emergency situation and had to quickly go for help on horseback? I have, and believe me, I wasn't worrying about my horse being silly or spooking at something... we had to get back to the barn, and get back NOW. At that point I couldn't care less about my horse's concerns... he was just a mode of transportation for rapidly finding help.
mildot and bellmcc like this.
     
    02-08-2012, 03:02 PM
  #108
Super Moderator
When people start talking about wanting to let their horse see everything and want him to check everything out or they want to get off and longe their horse a while until HE decides it is OK to go on I think of this kind of situation with two old cowboys like the ones in the Ace Reid cartoons. I see something like this:

Picture two old cowboys gathering a set of heifers on a rough pasture and bunch of them make a break for the heavy brush.

Zeke: "Hey Jim Bob! You need to cut across that draw and cut off those heifers before they git to the brush! I'll go this way to turn them to the corral."

Jim Bob: "I will, soon as I longe my horse a while. He don't wanna go down that steep draw. He's sceered of somthin. I don't want him to git upset. I'll be there soon as he's ready."

Zeke: "That's OK Jim Bob. Pet him a while and tell em it's OK. We kin always come back tomorrow and try to git em in. We'll call off the trucker and tell em we couldn't git em in today and he'll have to come back tomorrow to load em.

When horses have a job like Police horses and working ranch horses do, obedience is never optional. We don't ever lower ourselves to the level of a horse and 'argue' with them. We make ALL of the decisions and we expect a horse to just DO what is asked. A rider with this attitude get a lost less 'attitude' out of the horses they ride. Horses just respond by trying to do everything that is asked.
tbrantley, mildot, bellmcc and 1 others like this.
     
    02-08-2012, 05:18 PM
  #109
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
One of Cherie's posts describes step-by-step how she trains the "obedience & trust" into a horse, & that I find to be just "taking the time it takes" gradual development of the horse's trust by inching closer over time to the object (she said it can take 2 hours of going back & forth), so this is same as approach of the "relationship" folks. Cherie also said that she'll listen to her horse if it refuses to proceed on trail, giving snake experience as an example, so this is also same as approach of the "relationship" folks.

The bottom line is trust in the leader, & it's really not a matter of training trust into a horse; trust is earned, by showing consistently that one is trustworthy.

How does the alpha get that unquestioning, instant obedience? By being the best leader/making the best decisions.

Humans do well to remember that horses are aware of dangers that we aren't, "out there"; thus we are handicapped in our judgement & must listen to our horses.
The one thing in this post that I question is this: Humans do well to remember that horses are aware of dangers that we aren't, "out there"; thus we are handicapped in our judgement & must listen to our horses.[/QUOTE]

See I don't believe that is very accurate. Yes, horses can be very tuned in to their environment but don't forget there are horses being put down every day because of that hole in the ground they didn't see or the snake bite they never saw coming. My point is that they are not magical creatures, they can be just as fallible as people when it comes to risk assessment.

Also I don't understand why it keeps being insisted upon that we must listen to the instincts of a horse more than our own intellect and powers of reasoning. I don't understand why when we, as thinking, rational people who understand that an umbrella for example is not a threat, should be expected to put a horses mindless panic of an object it has absolutely no concept of, in the driving seat. This makes no sense to me. I am the leader because I know that that wrapped stack of hay is not a threat. I am the leader because I understand that an umbrella, flying plastic bag, dog barking behind the fence, are not threats. I am the leader because although I can't see it I know that that grunting sound is coming from a pig in a shed. Why would I let a horses irrational fear take charge?

I have established the role of leader by overriding my horses fearful instincts time and time again and she has never come to harm and now leaves the decision making to me very happily.

At the end of the day a horse doesn't have to understand what the hell that flying ghost thing was, they just have to trust that you as the rider KNOW it is not a threat.
omgpink, Walkamile, Darrin and 2 others like this.
     
    02-08-2012, 05:28 PM
  #110
Weanling
The first three words of this thread are, "How we train..." so I took it to mean the horse was not yet fully trained. My father was in the last Ohio Cavelry Reserve and from what he told me their horses were superbly trained. Their riders didn't just jump on a green horse and start chasing Indians. Not only that they spent their lives on top of a horse. Nor would I jump on a totally green horse and go for a trail ride. That's foolish, at least for me. We visited a million acre ranch at the foot of Steen Mountain last summer. The cowboys ride every day often fifty miles. These guys could ride anything. I am sure they would think nothing about jumping on any horse and taking off but I am not them and my ways are not their ways. It has nothing to do with being confident. Every rider should have confidence but what I am takling about is common sense. I have an aquintence who someone gave a free five year old quarter horse to. This fellow knows nothing about horses. THe horse is very green and can be explosive. The first thing he wanted to do was ride it on a gravel road. Advising this fellow to hop on his horse and have the confidence to ride it past any obstacle that the horse spooks at would not be in his best interest.
     

Tags
spooking, trail horse

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dog train my horse, or horse train my dog? momo3boys Horse Training 3 04-29-2011 11:49 AM
fearless? sophielou10 Horse Riding 20 04-16-2010 08:18 PM
Fearless and under stimulated filly. riccil0ve Horse Training 4 08-13-2009 01:54 PM
How do you train a horse to go on the bit? Please help!! Emma7442 Horse Training 34 02-23-2008 03:51 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0