This is how we train a fearless trail horse! - Page 23
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

This is how we train a fearless trail horse!

This is a discussion on This is how we train a fearless trail horse! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Train hors 23

Like Tree446Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-25-2012, 07:07 PM
  #221
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
Firstly, I only watched the first few minutes so I don't know what else happened.

Secondly, we are not talking about police horses here, but trail horses. Of course I agree that some degree of prior training is required, and the police choose to use desensitizing, which I have never said doesn't work. It is a perfectly effective training method.

Thirdly, I would not take an 'inexperienced horse' in a situation like this, it would be a recipe for disaster. They may not have been in this exact situation before, but I would want my horse to have been in plenty of scary situations before and learnt to trust my judgement when scared.

Fourth, I honestly believe I could take my gelding in a situation like that and still have control. Sure he would be looking around, maybe jogging with the exitement, but that would be about it. The bangs wouldn't be a huge deal as I crack a stockwhip off my horses. The screaming is about the same as he dealt with when he competed in world mounted games here a few years ago.

*Shrugs* Not purposefully desensitizing is not wrong. It is a different way of doing things that also works. None of us (I think!) have said that what you do is wrong, or doesn't work. How can you say that about our method when you obviously don't use it?
I have not said your method is wrong. You need to read the posts again and try and understand that I am making comparisons and taking into account other people's comments. Trail training is not wrong and neither is desenitisation. People do different things with their horses and it is about the methods which work best for your environment, your horse and what you face as you ride your horse wherever you ride it. The best person to judge what is safe for them and their horse is the person riding it. You just need to accept that in the big wide world, people have different view points and different opinions as well as different methods of what they do with their horses. Everyone is entitled to make a comment but it doesn't mean they are being disrespectful to anyone else.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-25-2012, 08:31 PM
  #222
Trained
Quote:
You just need to accept that in the big wide world, people have different view points and different opinions as well as different methods of what they do with their horses.
I accepted this a long, long time ago! I'm a mish-mash rider living and working within a horse area that is very heavily Olympic-discipline focussed/biased. There are very few people around me that ride/train/believe the way that I do, yet I am good friends with many of them and am quite well known in my area. I instruct kids through pony club who do completely different disciplines than I do yet I work with the way they ride and what their goals are.

I have zero issue with desensitizing. I did however have an issue with you implying that other methods 'won't work' in England due to the space issue. That is all I was trying to address. They may not be the most appropriate way for every rider or every horse, but nearly any method when used by someone who knows what they are doing will work in most situations.
     
    11-25-2012, 09:07 PM
  #223
Super Moderator
Jannette -- Where have you ridden that you had to look out for tigers?

I lived near and rode in the most rugged wilderness areas in the western Colorado mountains (locally called 'Switzerland of America') and we had the deer, elk and black bear and an occasional cougar, bighorn sheep and mountain goat, but tigers were half a world away.

One time, I did come around a sharp turn in a narrow trail on the east fork of the Cimarron River above the Silver Jack Mine and I ran face to face into a 10 or 12 point bull elk with several cows. I stopped about 6 feet from the bull elk. He was bigger than the little 3 year old Purebred Arabian gelding I was riding.

The elk shook his head a couple of times, turned around (thankfully) and left. But, elk were expected -- tigers -- not so much.
jannette likes this.
     
    11-26-2012, 01:32 AM
  #224
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
I accepted this a long, long time ago! I'm a mish-mash rider living and working within a horse area that is very heavily Olympic-discipline focussed/biased. There are very few people around me that ride/train/believe the way that I do, yet I am good friends with many of them and am quite well known in my area. I instruct kids through pony club who do completely different disciplines than I do yet I work with the way they ride and what their goals are.

I have zero issue with desensitizing. I did however have an issue with you implying that other methods 'won't work' in England due to the space issue. That is all I was trying to address. They may not be the most appropriate way for every rider or every horse, but nearly any method when used by someone who knows what they are doing will work in most situations.
You obviously have issues with a lot of things. Lets leave it there.
     
    11-28-2012, 02:33 PM
  #225
Foal
I had always been told to let the horse look and examine the object till they got over it, so was doing that for a long time, and what do you know, there is always something for them to stop and "see". Recently a trainer friend of mine told me not to do that, to just ride past it and don't let them fixate on it. It seemed very odd and completely opposite of what I had always been told. Your explanation of this makes me understand why now. It is great fun learning things that will make such a difference in the enjoyment and confidence out on the trail. Thanks for posting that.
Bluebird, Wheatermay and jaydee like this.
     
    11-28-2012, 10:53 PM
  #226
Foal
I do like this :3
I do have a thoroughbred mare, luckily she isn't too bad at being worried and spooky. Though she does have her moments I will start applying these things to her trail work training ^^
     
    11-29-2012, 07:24 PM
  #227
Foal
I am so glad I found this! I only trail ride except for showing in the 4H fair, which I am currently in my last year. I've only had horses for 2 years. My first was a crazy Appaloosa given to me for free because she was going to go to the sale barns and they knew she would go to a good home. I'll just say that she was not a good horse to start out on. I of course still have her, and I love to her absolute pieces. I rarely ride her though. My mom or any men I ride with who need a horse (they have the strength to make her do what is needed) are the ones to normally do that. And it's weird, I refuse to ride her in a saddle. I will only ride her bareback. But anyway, last year at the end of summer I rescued a yearling. Terrible, horendous shape. My mom didn't tell me but while I was a school (2 different times), she thought the poor girl was going to die.

The original owners (monsters) told us she was 2, but when she started declining in health the vet told us during a check up that she had just then turned 2, after having her for about half a year. This was at the end of spring this year. Turns out she was just losing her teeth and that's how he knew. So we ended up with a very sick baby girl. Got her back up to health again pretty fast, though. My mom and mentor told me it was time to start riding her when she finally got strong enough, so I did. And trust me I was not a heavy load I only weight 95 pounds! Over the summer (within 2 months) I had her trained as a green trail horse.

No heavy riding, just until they said she'd had enough for a day. I'm proud because I did it myself, even if my "trainer" (I usually just say mentor!) told me what to do. No one else has ever ridden my filly. My mom and her have only ever longed her. So then I showed her in the fair, which I really don't enjoy, but she blew everyone out of the water in the trail class. That definitely made me smile, seeing how she was by far the youngest horse at the show.

Then my mom and I went on a charity ride in October. 14 mile round trip, which was new to me and my baby girl. She did splendidly, for only being 2 and never having done anything that big before. The next day on trails in a heavily wooden area of nothing but hills was amazing too. I'm just so proud of her that I could cry. The fact that I was blessed enough to have such an amazing horse at such a young age makes me feel wonderful.

What I was getting at by typing this mini story is that on this website, any time I mention my horse's age, I get a lot of grief over it. Some of the people that have scolded me for riding a 2 year old have really made me feel bad. At one point I was scared to get on her because everyone had me thinking I was going to cause permanent damage to her, even though my vet gave me the 'OK'. But after reading this it gave me some new confidence for next year (I've put up the saddle for the winter). Especially since by the beginning of summer she will be 3, I feel that everyone else can kiss my filly's pretty little flanks!

I DO NOT ride my horse into the ground. She has an amazing home, gets everything she needs, and probably more. I love her to absolute pieces and if anything were to happen to her I wouldn't be able to live with myself. I sometimes wonder why people think I would hurt her after saving her life and taking the painstaking time and work to bring her off the verge of death. I take amazing care of her and my Appaloosa, and Lily (my filly) is the best horse I could have ever asked for. Next year is going to be the start of some serious training. I'm wanting to buy an Australian saddle because my western saddles are just lacking. I feel unsafe and uncomfortable, and know that I'm sitting right and that they fit the horses. They're just not right for me.

So Cherie, I wanted to thank you for making me feel better about riding a 2 year old. From now on when I get grief over the age of my horse and people saying that there's no way she's trained very well, I'm going to link them to this post and think "Na-na-na-na boo-boo!". You really don't know how good reading this made me feel about myself and my horse. And I'm going to apply these techniques more firmly next year than I did this year for sure. Lily is going to be the most amazing horse a lot of people around here have ever seen. I can feel it in my bones.

Thank you so much for this thread, Cherie!
jannette likes this.
     
    01-06-2013, 01:42 AM
  #228
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I know that you are absolutley right, and I wish I could do what you said about riding forward when the horse starts to get worried. I know that this is what would help Mac when he gets worried on the trail (which he worries a lot, though he isn't so much spooky as worried).

What is holding me back is that he has got me off 5 times by making incredibly sudden and unexpected spins. I'll be going along and thinking it's all going swimmingly and the next thing I know, he has kind of dropped out from under me as he bounced off his planted front legs and wheels, almost always to the right. Well, I get thrown forward and he spins out from under me. He's a bit downhill in build to begin with and if I am trotting and posting and he catches me on the up part, I am toast. At the canter he's done it and nearly pitched me. At the walk I can usually ride it out. And he's spun MANY times that were near dumpers for me but I stayed put.

SO, though I know I need to push him harder and faster forward, I find I just don't have the faith that he will stay going forward and not spin on me so fast that I'll hit the dirt , , again. (and I am not so young, either).

This is the only thing that I feel is't right between he and I . And we have worked on riding past scary things a lot and at the walk, he seems to be willing to be lead by me, but I just cannot make my mind and body commit, really committ to FORWARD! Like you say is required. I am not sure if I can block out the apprehension and go.

Not much you can do about that where you are, but just thought I'd put that out there.
My horse does the SAME thing. Between me and my husband, I'm the only one that can ride it out. My husband asks me how I do it, and I can't even answer because I have NO IDEA how I manage to stay on! It's very scary for me!
     
    02-07-2013, 06:13 PM
  #229
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
Thank you Wild Spot and Sahara and the others that actually understand and have ridden a good trail horse or a good ranch horse. A good well-trained saddle horse is not a 'dead-head'. I hate dead-heads -- except that I keep a couple around that I can put total dummies on and I know they will baby-sit even the dumbest rider that is doing everything wrong despite three people telling them not to.

Don't tell me that a horse is a dead-head just because he does not give you resistance and have his own agenda. Don't tell me a horse that you can run out after a steer that needs doctoring and rope and doctor him all by yourself (with the help of your horse, of course), is a dead-head. Don't tell me that a horse that carries a complete stranger up above timber-line in a place so steep and rough that a person would be hard-put to walk, is a dead-head. You get in places like that, you don't need a horse that wants to stop and sniff around or turn around to look or stuff.

I think that the people that actually think a horse loses its personality and its 'trained out of them' {choke} have just never ridden a good, well-mannered trail horse or a good ranch horse in their entire lives. How in the world can resistance and arguing be mistaken for personality?

I have never seen a well-trained trail horse or ranch horse stumble over a snake or anything else. But I can tell you that when I have a well-trained horse stop dead in his tracks, I know there is a real serious concern and I am smart enough to not force him forward. I KNOW there is something there. I never have to wonder if he is just looking or sniffing or if there is really a problem.

I had that exact thing happen about 5 years ago. I had a really solid ranch horse bow up his neck, stop and back up a step. I told my husband, who behind me, to help me see what was wrong because I knew something was wrong. About that time a Western Diamondback that was over 7 feet long and bigger around than my 200# husband's forearm raised up above 3 foot tall grass and started to rattle. His head was over 3 inches wide. He was the biggest Rattlesnake I have ever seen. My horse was probably 2 feet from his head when he stopped.

So no! A well-broke horse does not lose its personality or character. I just know there are an awful lot of people that have never ridden one.
Hi Cherie,
I know I'm late on responding. I'm a new member and just found your post. I loved what you wrote. You put everything into words that I have been doing with my horses. I recently sold a ranch horse that was the farthest thing from "dead".. but he was extremely respectful, got down to business and was mostly unflappable in every situation and on any terrain. He trusted me on everything and I rode him with the mentality you described in your original post. He had a job and he got it done. I sold him to buy a 2 yr old. Starting all over, but I'll ride the new one the same way.
     
    02-24-2013, 11:47 AM
  #230
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
Jannette -- Where have you ridden that you had to look out for tigers?

I lived near and rode in the most rugged wilderness areas in the western Colorado mountains (locally called 'Switzerland of America') and we had the deer, elk and black bear and an occasional cougar, bighorn sheep and mountain goat, but tigers were half a world away.

One time, I did come around a sharp turn in a narrow trail on the east fork of the Cimarron River above the Silver Jack Mine and I ran face to face into a 10 or 12 point bull elk with several cows. I stopped about 6 feet from the bull elk. He was bigger than the little 3 year old Purebred Arabian gelding I was riding.

The elk shook his head a couple of times, turned around (thankfully) and left. But, elk were expected -- tigers -- not so much.

Lol I was just making a funny :) we have cougars (mt. Lions) bears, wolves, dear, elk, ect.ect we are in NE Oregon so besides tigers you are likely to encounter about any wild life native to us :)
     

Tags
spooking, trail horse

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dog train my horse, or horse train my dog? momo3boys Horse Training 3 04-29-2011 11:49 AM
fearless? sophielou10 Horse Riding 20 04-16-2010 08:18 PM
Fearless and under stimulated filly. riccil0ve Horse Training 4 08-13-2009 01:54 PM
How do you train a horse to go on the bit? Please help!! Emma7442 Horse Training 34 02-23-2008 03:51 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0