I dont get my gelding...
 
 

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I dont get my gelding...

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  • My mare rared up and kicked me
  • Will putting a calm yearling in with dominant gelding make him dominant

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    08-08-2012, 09:24 AM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy I dont get my gelding...

I have a 12 year old gelding (that I've had for almost three years) and a 13 year old gelding (almost a year) who are best buds, never fought, got along with mares, have great ground manners and were always pleasures to have in my pastures. I recently took on a boarder who brought a mother and a four month old foal. My 13 year old will NOT leave them alone. He ran threw a stall guard (broke/splintered the wood) reared up and kicked out at me, his eyes are bulged out, breathes heavy whenever he is away from them, freaks out in his stall (paws, kicks out calls to others) this is totally not like him. I circle him in the paddok to calm him down. As soon as I let him go he runs over to the mama and baby and kicks my other gelding. This was the weird part, as my 12 year old was always top dog, although they NEVER fought until now, it was obvious. Any suggestions to help calm him down?

**PS The boarders just came about 5 days ago**
     
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    08-08-2012, 11:04 AM
  #2
Foal
These horses need to be separated for the safety of all four and anyone handling them.

Your gelding has decided he now owns the mare and foal. He is simply being protective and does not want ANYONE to get in between him and the mare and foal. If you can separate them, that would be ideal and things will settle between your two geldings.
     
    08-08-2012, 11:46 AM
  #3
Yearling
Agree with top post. The mare is now HIS mare, and that foal is HIS foal. He doesn't care who or what is between them - he's going through it.

They should definitely be seperated. Not an electric fence either, that he might get tangled up in. Wood fencing, if you have it, or the strongest thing next to it. Treat him like a stallion, for that is how he is acting. I would leave your other gelding out of there, just for a little while, untill your dominant gelding calms down.

Best of luck :)
     
    08-08-2012, 01:49 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Be prepared for him to run a fence and lose 200#. I have seen it happen many times.

Just another reason I never mix mares and geldings and try to not even run them across a fence from each other unless there is a hot wire on top.

Once he has gone crazy like he has, it may take complete removal of the mare or him one to get him back to normal.
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    08-09-2012, 01:11 AM
  #5
Weanling
Agree with everyone. He's looking at himself as the Lead "stallion" Although he's a gelding. He has claimed the mare & foal as "his".
He needs to be removed from the mare ASAP. & as does the other gelding

In the Wild Stallions Will protect their Mares & foals with their life because other stallions will come in & try to steal mares & foals from a heard & claim them & add them to their heard. Watch this

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    08-09-2012, 04:13 AM
  #6
Yearling
I had a gelding who was a sweetheart in every way, and got along well with other geldings alone etc. Naturally as a mare owner, he was paddocked with my mares, and before I got him he was the only gelding with a herd of mares who put him in his place. Apart from him giving the odd attempt at my alpha mare who settled him back down, he was fine.

However, once I sold her and had just my other mare and him, he was made the leader as Honey doesn't assert herself in the slightest in herd dynamics. The place I board at brought in a gelding and put him in the free land next to mine and that was it - he was completely different. He made sure the other gelding (in his own paddock, own fencing with about a metre gap between our paddocks) knew that Honey was his. He would snake his neck, bare his teeth, run up and down the fence as a barrier between them, make awful sounds, kick his legs and front foot defiantly if he deemed the other gelding as "too close". He turned into a nasty monster over my mare, who frankly, didn't care. However, he also laid into Honey, and his assertive behaviour became micro-managing. If I separated him from her he would challenge fences he was normally frightened of, break her out into longer grass - the works. Then he started ripping the rugs off her back - I knew he needed to be taken away from the gender differences, be either alone to get his head back on straight, or away from mares at least. I ended up having to sell him and he's now with a gelding and back to being a complete lamb. He was lovely to handle in every way, just in the paddock with Honey was he terrible with his reactions to the gelding and Honey.

Since this episode, I've sworn that I won't ever mix genders again. It's just not worth it. There's a gelding who roams the property (his owners don't put him back in his fencing which he constantly breaks out of) and he winds the mares up enough that I have to fence them back. That is enough to renew my opinion that mares and geldings get too attached in different ways and in some instances it gets ridiculous and dangerous. I would never personally own another gelding whilst I have Honey (and our other mare Seoul), unless I could guarantee they would be separated at all times. The stress is just not worth it.

Don't wait and do something about this now. My first attempt would be like the above, remove him for some "time out". He probably will fret and you will also fret about what his reaction might be! If he settles, good. If he doesn't, then you're going to have to think of a solution, or sadly move out the mare and foal. Some geldings are proudly cut, or just have stallion tendencies, like my gelding above.

Good luck!
     
    08-09-2012, 06:56 AM
  #7
Weanling
So strange. Guess its all about herd dynamics. I've heard so often, don't put mares and geldings together. However, I've done it lots. My mares and geldings are all together now and are doing fine..........

The only problem I have had lately is a mare, not a gelding, who is horse aggressive to the point that she hurts the other horses, and I have had to separate her. Thankfully, she doesn't belong to me and will be moved soon.
     
    08-09-2012, 02:46 PM
  #8
Weanling
My gelding has only been with mares and I have never had any problems but I didn't add any other geldings in the mix .he was only with them from 6 months old to 3 years. So age changes things.
     
    08-09-2012, 03:35 PM
  #9
Started
He needs to be separated from the group for particularly the foal & your safety. He will throw a fit over being separated, likely try a fence/loose weight etc.. hopefully with some time out (weeks) he can learn to accept the new arrangement.
     
    08-09-2012, 06:30 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SplashedOvero    
My gelding has only been with mares and I have never had any problems but I didn't add any other geldings in the mix .he was only with them from 6 months old to 3 years. So age changes things.

My gelding was the same, he had learnt mare tendencies and was well balanced with the mares. Bringing in another gelding can COMPLETELY change things, or everyone could be happier! From my experience though, if there is more than one gelding around, things can turn messy.

I guess guys either like hanging out with their mates, or being the only guy with all the female attention eh?
SplashedOvero likes this.
     

Tags
foal, horse advice, problem behavior

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