I feel like my trainer/BO is slowing me down.
 
 

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I feel like my trainer/BO is slowing me down.

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    07-04-2013, 10:53 PM
  #1
Foal
Thumbs down I feel like my trainer/BO is slowing me down.

I bought a horse who is very good, but not broke. I intended to keep him at my neighbors and friend, but she only has 3 paddocks and a small outdoor arena with jumps. (like 15 acres). So I decided to keep him a few miles away at a facility with a trainer and all the goods (round pen ect) because I felt it would make my job much easier in training him. I told the BO this and warned him I planned on breaking him within two months so by the time august came I would be able to bring him home.
My horse is smart and very mild and we work so well together. I feel he is ahead of me. I haven't been training him much for the past few weeks as it has been raining pretty bad and no indoor arena. But now the BO has stopped helping me and I have started moving my horse ahead to where I think he is and I have even sat on him and had him at a walk with a side pull no bit! The BO comes out and when he sees me training he says I am moving too fast and skipping steps, but refuses to help me or show me what he is talking about. I feel he is just trying to prolong my stay there, and he gets mad when I don't buy things from his tack shop! I'm not totally sure he isn't right, but I feel my horse might be the kind that can skip steps. He drives, lunges, and takes a rider, just not bitted yet (working on that). Should I slow down? Or is this guy trying to take advantage of my young age and boss me around?
     
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    07-04-2013, 11:34 PM
  #2
Green Broke
From my perspective, I think you need to be methodical with every horse - in other words don't skip steps. If you've truly got one of those self-training/born broke type horses you can spend less time on each phase of training (eg maybe the horse "gets it" in two days instead of a week sort of thing and you're free to move on) but don't omit anything. When training, what you are really doing is giving your horse an education so make sure he's got all the experience/skills possible because it will help him down the road -- the same way a good education helps the human counterpart.

With regard to your timelines, just remember training takes as long as it needs to take to get a good start on a horse so don't feel the need to rush to meet an arbitrary deadline (ie August).

With regard to the BO, it's hard to say - it almost sounds like he's looking out for his best interests so make sure you're looking out for yours.

Best of luck.
flytobecat and loveduffy like this.
     
    07-04-2013, 11:35 PM
  #3
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undante    
I bought a horse who is very good, but not broke. I intended to keep him at my neighbors and friend, but she only has 3 paddocks and a small outdoor arena with jumps. (like 15 acres). So I decided to keep him a few miles away at a facility with a trainer and all the goods (round pen ect) because I felt it would make my job much easier in training him. I told the BO this and warned him I planned on breaking him within two months so by the time august came I would be able to bring him home.
My horse is smart and very mild and we work so well together. I feel he is ahead of me. I haven't been training him much for the past few weeks as it has been raining pretty bad and no indoor arena. But now the BO has stopped helping me and I have started moving my horse ahead to where I think he is and I have even sat on him and had him at a walk with a side pull no bit! The BO comes out and when he sees me training he says I am moving too fast and skipping steps, but refuses to help me or show me what he is talking about. I feel he is just trying to prolong my stay there, and he gets mad when I don't buy things from his tack shop! I'm not totally sure he isn't right, but I feel my horse might be the kind that can skip steps. He drives, lunges, and takes a rider, just not bitted yet (working on that). Should I slow down? Or is this guy trying to take advantage of my young age and boss me around?
Are you paying the BO to train you and your horse? If not, he's not at all required to help you. He may just be tired of giving free advice to someone who is returning nothing to him, by way of paying for training or buying from his tack store.
     
    07-04-2013, 11:50 PM
  #4
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undante    
but I feel my horse might be the kind that can skip steps. He drives, lunges, and takes a rider, just not bitted yet (working on that). Should I slow down? Or is this guy trying to take advantage of my young age and boss me around?
That's how you end up with holes in the horse's training.
     
    07-04-2013, 11:58 PM
  #5
Yearling
First welcome to the forum --training a horse young or old you have to follow steps so you know how the horse is doing with each new thing, it is like when you were tested in school, so make sure the horse know every thing before you move forward with some thing new that will make a better horse in the long run
     
    07-05-2013, 12:01 AM
  #6
Weanling
[QUOTE=Chevaux;2971634]From my perspective, I think you need to be methodical with every horse - in other words don't skip steps. If you've truly got one of those self-training/born broke type horses you can spend less time on each phase of training (eg maybe the horse "gets it" in two days instead of a week sort of thing and you're free to move on) but don't omit anything. When training, what you are really doing is giving your horse an education so make sure he's got all the experience/skills possible because it will help him down the road -- the same way a good education helps the human counterpart. [QUOTE]

I agree - I think you should cover ALL the steps even if you move through some more quickly than others. Its great that he is a quick learner but you don't want to have gaps in his education that cause problems later on.
loveduffy likes this.
     
    07-05-2013, 01:25 AM
  #7
Green Broke
I think you need to cover all aspects and steps of training, even if you find you are able to move through some steps quickly. Otherwise, you'll find there were things you didn't enforce at a young age and you are needing later on.

Do you pay your BO for his advice? If not, either politely ask him not to give it or sit down and discuss how you are feeling. There is no point continuously ignoring his help and him not knowing why. He may not even be intentionally slowing your horses progress down, or doing it for what he believes is a very legitimate reason.

The best way to resolve the problem is through communication. Good luck.
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    07-05-2013, 02:26 AM
  #8
Started
I don't know which happened first- the BO stopped helping you, or you started moving too quickly. If I were your BO and you started skipping advice/ steps that I was giving you, I would likely stop helping too. I don't want to continually give advice when it is ignored! However, it's a different story if he stopped helping you before you started doing things "your own way".

Like folks have said, if you're not paying him for his advice then you can't really expect anything to come from it. He may be too busy doing barn business to stand with you and your horse for extended periods of time to help you out for no pay. On the other hand, have you actually ASKED him to explain himself? If he looks at you and says "You're going way too quickly!!" and you say "Ok, please explain what I should be doing instead", how does he react?

When breaking horses (especially if this is a new process for you) I am WAY more inclined to take it it slowly and not skip any steps. It'll save you lots of time and effort in the long run if you get it right the first time.
     
    07-05-2013, 02:59 AM
  #9
Foal
Think how you learnt to ride. If you were lunged, he should be lunged. You started walking, then slowly trotting, bouncing around till you got the rhythm. Work on his mistakes and vices until he understands. Also when you start bitting him, rub carrot juice or molasses on there so he doesn't mind the taste
ChingazMyBoy likes this.
     
    07-05-2013, 07:59 AM
  #10
Trained
If you're willing to skip steps in a horses first go at training, I have to wonder if this is really something you should be doing at all. What's your experience breaking horses? Have you considered that you could be causing many facepalm moments for your BO and he may just be waiting out the month until you leave?

NEVER skip steps with training. Cover all the bases. Doesn't mean you have to take as long with everything but it should still all be covered.
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