I have a dangerous horse
 
 

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I have a dangerous horse

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  • Dangerous horse
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    10-16-2008, 10:13 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy I have a dangerous horse

So, I'm new to the forum, and im hoping someone can help me out. I am a fifteen year old horse lover and I have two horses. Jack, a bay 8 year old quarter horse gelding, and Tulie, a chestnut 5 year old Dutch Warmblood mare. My aunt built a barn on her property that she owns with my grandparents and is a lovely place. The horses are never locked in a stall and so spoiled. Solo, a 26 year old horse who is very attached to Jack, lives at our barn, while Tulie is being trained at a boarding stable.

Jack Used to be a fabulous horse. I had won shows with him when he was younger and used to be able to jump small courses of jumps. Now, the only thing I have to do with him is feeding him and cleaning his stalls and paddocks. He pretty much mutated into a vicious horse, who scares everyone. He cribs and bites. My aunt who really owns him was trying to train with a Parelli trainer one day, just so she could learn to manage Jack. They'd been working for about an hour when Jack Lounged at her and bit her in the chest. It left a hugggee bruise and Its been about three weeks since this occured and it still hurts occaisonally. Whenever anyone goes near jack, he pins his ears and threatens to bite or kick. My aunt and I are not experienced enough to handle him anymore. My parents hate that I go help my aunt because they are worried for my safety. My grandparents, who want nothing to do with horses are worried for everyone's safety. My aunt, doesn't seem to realize the danger and says that if we sell Jack he will be beaten and Solo will die of loneliness.

Sorry this is so long. But I don't know what to do. I do not enjoy anything about being near Jack and He scares me. My aunt will never let him go and we can not afford sending him to be trained or to hire a trainer. Everyone says to just give him away, but my aunt won't budge. What can I do?
     
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    10-16-2008, 10:45 PM
  #2
Started
Don't go near this horse. OK, I'm a mom and I'd never let you go to your aunt's place (and that horse) if I was your mom. I think your aunt needs to decide if which is more expensive: the hospital bills and lawsuit that's inevitable if that horse hurts someone or a trainer.

I think this horse has leaned how to be boss and he likes it. Why doesn't she bring back the safe horse and send this one away for training?
     
    10-16-2008, 10:47 PM
  #3
Showing
I would strongly suggest you take this horse to a trainer, it sounds like Jack's behavior has gotten dangerous to the point it's beyond your capabilities... send him to a trainer or get a trainer to come to you.
There is a lot of good advice floating around on the internet, but this sounds like a bad situation that needs expert handling, not playing around with different techniques.


ETA - I just read your last paragraph. Find this horse another home. BUT DO NOT LET HIM GO WITHOUT DISCLOSING EVERY LITTLE DETAIL ABOUT HIS BEHAVIOR.
     
    10-16-2008, 10:51 PM
  #4
Showing
Why does your aunt not send this guy out for some handling to a trainer? Unfortunately you don't have the experience (and bless your soul for knowing so) and if your aunt won't spend money on him for training, there isn't anything else you can do. I would stay away from him for safety reasons.

Horses like that can be worked with and re-trained. Try to have a chat with your aunt. Selling him could also be an option, tho you wouldn't be able to sell him for much and you would have to make sure you let the potential buyers know about his behavior. Right now it's more of a safety issue for everyone incolved than anything else

Hope it helps.
     
    10-16-2008, 10:55 PM
  #5
Foal
Thank you guys very much... This is definitely a situation I don't like... And I will continue to talk to my aunt to try to convince her what should happen. There is a man who trains horses and I have seen the wonders he has done. He has taken in friends horses who they just didn't want anymore and he's pretty much broken them of their bad habits and found them good homes. My aunt just doesnt seem to want to part with Jack. But believe me, my entire family is working on it. =[

Thank you for ur input and others are certainly welcome
     
    10-16-2008, 11:54 PM
  #6
Trained
This is going to sound hard hearted but I'm really not trying to be. I'm a mom of a 14 yo daughter and I would straight up FORBID her from being around a horse like that. Period. No discussion.

Your safety comes first...NO EXCEPTIONS!!!

Your aunt needs to have a vet out. Jack could have neurological issues. He may NEVER be OK. He may need put down. I hate to say that but safety is always number one when it comes to working with horses.

When a good horse suddenly goes bad there is more to think about than just attitude and a trainer. If the horse is really this dangerous...I wouldn't suggest you sell him. You/your aunt could be at risk of a lawsuit.

Even if the people you sold this horse to someone that thought they could work it out of him, (Like I said earlier, It could be a loose wire in his brain....He could have serious issues here...) That horse could end up beaten and on his way to old mexico for slaughter.

I can't see an 8yo gelding turning bad all of a sudden. As I understand it he was a great horse just a few years back. What happened? Why does he not trust humans? Was he beaten? Shackled? Tied? It would have to be some sort of serious abuse...IF ITS JUST ATTITUDE!!!

If the horse has been well taken care of, He may just be nuts, and then putting him down WOULD be the loving thing to do.

BTW- I'm very sorry. Be careful sweetie!!!!!!!
     
    10-17-2008, 02:29 AM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dumas'_Grrrl    
This is going to sound hard hearted but I'm really not trying to be. I'm a mom of a 14 yo daughter and I would straight up FORBID her from being around a horse like that. Period. No discussion.

Your safety comes first...NO EXCEPTIONS!!!

Your aunt needs to have a vet out. Jack could have neurological issues. He may NEVER be OK. He may need put down. I hate to say that but safety is always number one when it comes to working with horses.

When a good horse suddenly goes bad there is more to think about than just attitude and a trainer. If the horse is really this dangerous...I wouldn't suggest you sell him. You/your aunt could be at risk of a lawsuit.
Amen! There is no way I'd let my kids be anywhere near this horse. This situation is a disaster waiting to happen. Please, please stay away from this horse.

Look, it's almost 1:30 in the the morning here and I'm up because my baby (she's 10 1/2) is very sick. She's got pneumonia and she's been on oxygen for more than a week. She's taken a turn for the worse tonight. As her mommy, this is horrible. I hate watching my beautiful little girlie struggle to live and be healthy. Please don't put your parents in the position of sitting by your bedside after you've suffered an injury at the hands (or hooves, I should say) of this horse.


     
    10-17-2008, 10:53 AM
  #8
Started
Sweetie I know what you are going through, to an extent. I recently bought a 7 year old Hanoverian gelding for the price of gas to go get him...can you believe that? The reason for this was because he was a biter, kicker, man hater, would charge, rear, with shots he would rear and strike and was said to be dangerous, vicious and unpredictable. He was weeks away from being put down I found out later. He was spoiled as a baby so he didn't learn manners, as a yearling he was physically held down by 4 men while the vet gave him shots (only after the vet tried to twitch him and then chain him), he was put into dressage training at 2 where they would smack him with whips when he was "bad," as a 4 year old he started cross country jumping which he came away from being terrified of jumps and even ground poles, and his behavior was still so bad that the owner sent him to an equine behaviorist for a year. She tried to sell him so then she sent him to a college to try to be part of their dressage program and that's when things really got out of hand. He attacked one of the workers, bit and kicked a lot of people, and couldn't be trusted. And he was never turned out with other horses until he was 6 years old.

Sounds like I'm crazy, huh? I knew that's not who this horse was, it was just who he had to be to protect his dignity. See, this horse is very brave, confident and dominant. Horses like this are not afraid people are going to kill them. They are afraid people will take away their dignity. So they defend it will all they have. This is what my guy was having to do. I wanted a challenge for my next horse and I sure got it. I've only had him 7 months but the changes in this horse are incredible. He's so nice to ride now, I sometimes ride him barback with just a halter out in the corn fields behind our house. He's still got some issues but he has 6 years worth of walls to break down. He's like a Dr. Jeykl Mr. Hyde type personality. He is so darn sweet one moment and the next he's pinning his ears and acting like he hates your guts. When he does that I promptly drive him away and I won't let him come back until I have two ears full forward with a nice look on his face. And then he's fine. Back to Mr. Nice Guy. He's a very complex horse, pretty extreme in some areas but boy have I learned a lot. I'm doing a 4 day clinic with him in a couple weeks where I hope to get this attitude thing figured out. The clinician is one of my favorites and I know she will be able to give me some advice.

And for those who may be wondering, I've never been kicked or bitten by this horse. Shots are now a mild issue and he does not hate men:roll:

Sorry, I didn't mean for this post to be all about my horse....goodness! Anyway, I would be getting a professional in there to help you. It sounds like something happened to trigger this. Horses don't just snap, unless there truly is something wrong with them. Good luck and stay safe!
     
    10-17-2008, 11:03 AM
  #9
Showing
I agree with Dumas. Per your say he was a great horse and all sudden became a fire-breathing monster. Yes, certain behavior can come from dominance, but I don't believe SUCH badly SO sudden. I'd rather vote for something goes wrong with his health OR he was really badly abused by someone and you (your family) just don't know about it. If it's a health issue spending money on trainer will be just a waste. May be putting him down is the only option.
     
    10-17-2008, 11:06 AM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
Horses like this are not afraid people are going to kill them. They are afraid people will take away their dignity. So they defend it will all they have.
I'm sorry I have to disagree. Horses do not have personalities like people do, and the horse was probably defending himself to live.
I don't want this to turn into an argument at all, but wanted to point out something that I do not agree with. Horses do not think like humans and should NEVER EVER be thought of this way when dealing with a dangerous horse - it can lead to BIG trouble. If you're anticipating a horse to react more akin to a human than a prey animal, that can put you in a dangerous spot.
It really sounds like the OP needs some professional help, and that is NOTHING to be ashamed of; a lot of people wouldn't be able to take on a horse like that, just as Spirithorse has already suggested. Perhaps she could point you to some trainers/techniques that have worked for her?
     

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