I need to know what to do. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 03:14 PM
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I agree with northernmama and iridehorses. This is not a work him harder keep his mind going issue. If he is rearing at you this is a very, VERY dangerous issue. It's a severe lack of respect and without they proper help, and i mean, someone with that type of knowledge physically watching this horse do whatever he is doing and helping to fix it. You can't just go off advice here. Rearing is just about the most dangerous thing a horse can do. And if you are getting to the point of being afraid. You need help. Find a trainer and get help. Honostly, that's what you need.
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post #12 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 04:15 PM
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i think it depends on the horse...i just use the same method i use when they try to buck with me...havent had it not work.....yet

i have an appy that rears when i do something he doesnt like, (fly spray, worming, etc) soooo...every time he rears now i pull his nose in and we do circles....tight circles...and usually after a couple of times of this he stands

it worked on a couple of 3 uear olds i was starting under saddle that liked to give a buck when i tried to lope them some.....

but it may not work for every horse so i dont know.....

another way to teach a horse to lower their head( in case pulling on the lead makes him rear more) is to apply light pressure at the poll until they drop enough to relieve the pressure...I strated that with my horse and after a few times, as soon as i lifted his bridle, he dropped his head for me...

that may help some as well...i really dont know....either way ...Good Luck!!!

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post #13 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses
Personally I think it's time to get some help. I think you are over your head with your horse and are creating a very dangerous situation for anyone else who has to handle him or any future owners.

There comes a time when getting all the advise you ask for is not enough and someone else has to step in. Your fear is being transmitted to your horse and he is taking advantage of it. It will only escalate from here without someone to take over his training for a while.

You are 100% correct in saying that green horses and green riders do no mix. It is all to often a common occurrence and many of these horses are passed on to unknowing riders - the auctions are full of them.

I don't mean to come across as harsh but from the tone of your posts, I don't think you can safely carry out his training at the moment. Some outside help for both of your may be just the thing to instill some confidence in you and respect in him.
I totally agree. There is a saying that green+green= black and blue.

What your horse is doing is very DANGEROUS. You could get seriously hurt or even killed. It is not worth it. It is time to get professional help. While I don't disagree with what the others are saying, I think it needs to be done by a professional who knows what they are doing.

One other thing. Bring a whip with you when you are near him. If he does rear at you HIT HIM AS HARD AS YOU CAN!!! You CAN NOT hurt him with the whip. I know it sounds mean, but if it is a matter of life and death (and a rearing horse is) you need to protect yourself first.

Good luck and stay safe.
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post #14 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 05:12 PM
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That's an interesting topic. Something I havent had to deal with my horses or had ever thought about. I once bought a horse that had a habit of rearing up and flipping for the sake of getting you off. Fixed that problem quickly;)

My training method with issues like that and I don't know that it would be the best situation in this case. It's sounds like a mixture of lack of respect on his end, fear coming from you and he knows he can whatever he wants so...

It's hard to say that this would work for you or him because it doesn't like you have the experience handling goofy horses like that. With situations like this you need to be able to understand their body language well and be able to tell ahead of time before it happens that he's going to be a punk.

Get him on the lunge line and work with him on the ground. If he has the energy to be a jerk to you, he will have the energy to work 2 times harder on the lunge line.

Its going to soung bad to some people but if you feel that you can handle this put him in a situation where you think he might even showing signs of wanting to rear up on you. The second he shows an inckling of it makes him trot on the lunge line. A good forward hard trot. Go back at the beginning and start over until he gets the point across that NO he is NOT going to be playing games.

The problem with rearing is it's very dangerous both when on the horse and on the ground. I would think it's actually more difficult to handle from the ground than on them but again I wouldn't know as the only horse who used to rear would do so when I would be on him.

If your horse is rearing when you're around him, he must be pushing you around with a lot more than what you have told us on your post. All it might take is for you to work with him a lot from the ground and re-establish the respect issue. Unfortunately if he's taken it as far as he has, it must have been happening for a while and it tells me you don't have the experience handling a very intelligent and punky animal.
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post #15 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 08:39 PM
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Stop lunging or roundpenning him. Control his head at all times with a leadrope or reins. Catch him, tie him, groom him, tack him, ride him, tie him, untack him, groom him, let him go. That's it. If you want more bonding, handgraze him on the lead. Be completely businesslike for a few months--he's got a job to do, make him do it. Don't give him a chance to rear at you. He's either on a leadrope being led or tied by you, or he's under saddle and bridle being ridden by you. Control his head at all times. When you've gotten your confidence back, and he understands that you are boss, you can move on to other things.
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post #16 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 11:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrow
Stop lunging or roundpenning him. Control his head at all times with a leadrope or reins. Catch him, tie him, groom him, tack him, ride him, tie him, untack him, groom him, let him go. That's it. If you want more bonding, handgraze him on the lead. Be completely businesslike for a few months--he's got a job to do, make him do it. Don't give him a chance to rear at you. He's either on a leadrope being led or tied by you, or he's under saddle and bridle being ridden by you. Control his head at all times. When you've gotten your confidence back, and he understands that you are boss, you can move on to other things.
Ok now I want an explanation as to the advice against lunging?
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post #17 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 11:51 PM
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Lunging is fine for people who know what they're doing, it's fine for specific training--voice commands, teaching a young horse balance, or whatever. But this person has a horse rearing at them. The best way for her to take command of this horse is to keep control of its head at all times. Don't give the horse any opportunities to rear at her, make the horse do its job which presumably it being ridden.

If you aren't really confident and really coordinated, lunging may not work for you. Doing the simple things--leading, tying, riding--should be within the grasp of the op, so start with those simple things. Leave the roundpenning to the professional trainers.
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post #18 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 11:57 PM
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post #19 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 11:58 PM
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And your point is?
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post #20 of 23 Old 07-21-2008, 11:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrow
Lunging is fine for people who know what they're doing, it's fine for specific training--voice commands, teaching a young horse balance, or whatever. But this person has a horse rearing at them. The best way for her to take command of this horse is to keep control of its head at all times. Don't give the horse any opportunities to rear at her, make the horse do its job which presumably it being ridden.

If you aren't really confident and really coordinated, lunging may not work for you. Doing the simple things--leading, tying, riding--should be within the grasp of the op, so start with those simple things. Leave the roundpenning to the professional trainers.
Ok. I appreciate the post :)
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