I swear he's half motorcycle...
 
 

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I swear he's half motorcycle...

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  • My barrel horse is folding up around the barrel

 
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    07-07-2011, 09:43 PM
  #1
Foal
I swear he's half motorcycle...

So anyways, I broke Shnook about a year ago and haven't been having any consistent things I haven't been able to work through with him (He's an amazing jumper, excellent on the flat). Eeeeexcept this one thing he just decided to pick up a month ago and I'm a bit stumped with. It used to be the two bottom corners of the field that if we were cantering he would lean his whole body like a motorcycle to get around the corner and use it as an excuse to pick up speed. I've been working with him on not rushing and I'm glad to say it stopped with the one corner but the other he still leans his body sideways to get around. I've been keeping him in mind not to rush, and have tried circling the corner while counter-flexing which seems to help a bit but there's not much improvement (his head will look away and he'll straighten his body upwords to a couple inches.). He never used to do this before and won't do it in any other field (The footing is very good to boot). When he goes "sideways" He'll go so much he feels about halfway to the ground (I've had my non horsey friends comment on how he looks like he's drifting when they come over, but they don't know how to add more onto the subject. It's just me here working with the ponies so I don't have anyone to give me any imput). I don't want a chance of him hurting himself over a new random habbit, but as to get him over it I'm a little stuck on what to try.. I don't have any poles anymore (I just moved, so our jumps are fake rocks and tires). We have no problems otherwise, he acts amazing, it just seems to be this one thing. Any advice?
     
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    07-07-2011, 10:24 PM
  #2
Weanling
Hi!

Sounds like he needs some help balancing in those corners, which would explain the leaning as well as the increase in speed. Think about when you trip on something, you usually don't just walk back into balance, you have to take a few steps running to catch yourself from falling. What are you doing in the saddle when this happens? I feel like the instinctual thing to do is to lean away from where he is leaning in to, but this will actually make the situation worse and push him more into the lean, so keep that in mind (I have no idea if that is the case without seeing it). The horse I ride will lean in the canter occasionally but not one method will help every time, I usually have to feel it out. Sometimes, I'll really use my inside leg to push him back into balance (and into the outside rein). However, I have also used my outside leg / contact for the result. This past weekend it was all inside seat bone. How is he in, say, a 20 m circle?
     
    07-07-2011, 11:10 PM
  #3
Foal
My horse is doing the same thing around corners. Apparently she isn't balancing herself correctly. To try and teach her balance I've been lunging her at the canter without a saddle. So far she's been improving
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    07-08-2011, 11:47 AM
  #4
Foal
Hi, this sounds like a balance problem... When I broke in my little'n (11.3h welsh a) even in trot he'd speed up to keep balanced... so I would suggest some balancing exercise...!

Also it is very important to make sure your position is good and correct, because if your leaning forward with this movement he'll be feeling more unbalanced which will cause him to lean in more and speed up... also remember to look where your going because it helps straighten your position and your horses...

Lunging is good on a tight circle, also riding on a 20m circle collecting and extending the paces... also depending on the size of where you ride do some transitions on the circles, like walk a 10m, trot a 15m and canter a 20, and then go back down in sizes and paces.... also working in a good solid walk will help so lots of circles in walk before you go into canter...

It'll take time but he'll balance himself out... also you didn't say how old he is? Because chances are if his 4-6 (depending on bred) his still growing a bit, and this can unbalance them also... is he bum high?
     
    07-09-2011, 07:25 AM
  #5
Foal
Thank you guys~ <3 When I ride him to the corner I keep myself upright and use my body to balance him best I can (By using my seat legs and contact). It turns out he won't do this with my mom, so it's definitely me. I went to the doctors the other day though and turns out I'm a couple months pregnant. He told me my balance would be off so explains a fair bit. Mom and my doctor think he's just trying to compensate for my balance. He does do this for beginners but doesn't usually lean to do it. He's about 9-10 years. I will start lunging him however and keep his works up. Nice thing is I found a friend who can ride him for me that I trust with him. :)
     
    07-09-2011, 10:24 AM
  #6
Banned
I don't know much about english riding ( I am assuming you ride english?) but my morgan mare used to do this to me all time, and we barrel race so dropping her sholder and picking up speed going aroung a barrel is not a good thing, so I went to a friend and she told me that when I ask my horse to turn sometimes a would drop my hand to my hip instead of bringing it up to my shoulder (of course you will not need to bring it this high but when you are full speed around a barrel you do) so I starting working her and practicing like that and right away she started picking up that shoulder and baalencing properly again, any way I don't know if that helps in your situation but I hope maybe I helped a little.
     
    07-09-2011, 06:49 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
I do not think it is a balance thing. I think you have been using too much outside rein to get her into the corners so she is looking out and dropping her inside shoulder. It is a really bad habit as it can cause a horse the lose its footing behind and 'pancake' out flat on her side.

Teach her leg yielding exercises and then use your inside leg to PUSH her farther into the corners and you can then use your inside rein to keep her in a good rounded position. Any time you use your outside rein to 'hold' a horse out, you are putting them in exactly the wrong body position for them to correctly 'use' themselves and you encourage them to drop their inside shoulder.

Your reins only control the direction your horse is looking. Your legs have to control each part of the horse from his shoulders back. Your legs have to control the horse's shoulders, ribs and hips. Your reins only control the head and to some extent, the neck. Your reins can make a horse 'look' a certain direction, but they sure cannot make him go there. He has to follow his shoulders -- not his nose, so you need much better shoulder control.

Once you start doing leg yielding exercises, you should be able to start pushing your horse out in a circle -- make it bigger with just your inside rein and inside leg. I would get a LOT of body and hip control in circles and in leg yielding to the rail from 20 feet away from the rail before you try to make it work in the corners. Your horse will resist bringing its head in on the corners, so you will have to have her VERY obedient to your inside leg.
     
    07-10-2011, 10:46 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
I do not think it is a balance thing. I think you have been using too much outside rein to get her into the corners so she is looking out and dropping her inside shoulder. It is a really bad habit as it can cause a horse the lose its footing behind and 'pancake' out flat on her side.

Teach her leg yielding exercises and then use your inside leg to PUSH her farther into the corners and you can then use your inside rein to keep her in a good rounded position. Any time you use your outside rein to 'hold' a horse out, you are putting them in exactly the wrong body position for them to correctly 'use' themselves and you encourage them to drop their inside shoulder.

Your reins only control the direction your horse is looking. Your legs have to control each part of the horse from his shoulders back. Your legs have to control the horse's shoulders, ribs and hips. Your reins only control the head and to some extent, the neck. Your reins can make a horse 'look' a certain direction, but they sure cannot make him go there. He has to follow his shoulders -- not his nose, so you need much better shoulder control.

Once you start doing leg yielding exercises, you should be able to start pushing your horse out in a circle -- make it bigger with just your inside rein and inside leg. I would get a LOT of body and hip control in circles and in leg yielding to the rail from 20 feet away from the rail before you try to make it work in the corners. Your horse will resist bringing its head in on the corners, so you will have to have her VERY obedient to your inside leg.
Problem is he looks to the inside when we do the corners. I just started making him counter flex to see if it would help. He's normally very responsive with my leg and I can make him give me flexion on either side with just my legs and no reins and also have him doing 20 meters to 10 meters/under if at a slower pace with no reins and just my legs. He's very responsive and very obedient but just has trouble with that one corner.
     
    07-10-2011, 01:08 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
How does he lean if his ribs are pushed out and his nose is to the center? I have not seen this happen and really do not know how a horse could even do that.

Is there anyway to post a video of what he is doing.

Is there any reason that he is rushing through the corner because he has decided there is a scary woolie booger there?

If that is the case, I would roll him back against the fence and change directions just past the corner. I would do it as many times as it takes to get him to slow down. Then, when he is thoroughly sick of folding up and reversing, let him stand and rest in that corner.

Every time you are through riding, do some more of these exercises, stand him there for at least five minutes of rest (do it by your watch) and then, when he is absolutely quiet and settled (preferable resting a hind foot), dismount, loosen your girth and lead him back to the barn.

End every ride with a rest time and dismount in the corner he hates. I have never seen this method fail for getting any horse over hating a certain area, jump or place.

Every roping horse should end each ride by resting in the roping box (especially heading horses). Every jumper should end each ride by resting alongside of a jump it is Leary of. Every barrel horse should end each ride resting at a barrel and be led from the ring. Every lesson in a ring should end with each student resting their horse in the farthest corner of the ring, dismounting, loosening the girth and leading the horse out. If there is more than one student, they should end their rides one at a time and leave the ring one at a time. There should NEVER be a mass exodus to the gate. This would end a myriad of problems
     
    07-10-2011, 01:23 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
How does he lean if his ribs are pushed out and his nose is to the center? I have not seen this happen and really do not know how a horse could even do that.

Is there anyway to post a video of what he is doing.

Is there any reason that he is rushing through the corner because he has decided there is a scary woolie booger there?

If that is the case, I would roll him back against the fence and change directions just past the corner. I would do it as many times as it takes to get him to slow down. Then, when he is thoroughly sick of folding up and reversing, let him stand and rest in that corner.

Every time you are through riding, do some more of these exercises, stand him there for at least five minutes of rest (do it by your watch) and then, when he is absolutely quiet and settled (preferable resting a hind foot), dismount, loosen your girth and lead him back to the barn.

End every ride with a rest time and dismount in the corner he hates. I have never seen this method fail for getting any horse over hating a certain area, jump or place.

Every roping horse should end each ride by resting in the roping box (especially heading horses). Every jumper should end each ride by resting alongside of a jump it is Leary of. Every barrel horse should end each ride resting at a barrel and be led from the ring. Every lesson in a ring should end with each student resting their horse in the farthest corner of the ring, dismounting, loosening the girth and leading the horse out. If there is more than one student, they should end their rides one at a time and leave the ring one at a time. There should NEVER be a mass exodus to the gate. This would end a myriad of problems
It's not my horse cause like I said, it's really only me that works with them and I have no one to take pictures for me or videotape. But he kinda does what the horse on the right is doing only with a bit more of a lean. I've been working with him but have had to ease up lately. His head might not be brought to the middle but he's definitely looking where he's going (I'm also very light on the reins, if I can avoid using them I will. I'd much rather steer with my legs.).


I'm more so going to go with what my doctor and mom suggested with it being balance. Namely because he only does it with me, my balance is off lately *Post I wrote about just finding out about being pregnant* which is totally normal to lose but it just took me until after posting this thread to find out it was me.
     

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